Honors Winter in Rome

Rome and the Performance of Power

Staging the City: Rome and the Performance of Power

January 5 - March 9, 2012

15 Credits

The Honors Program is excited to offer its seventh annual winter-quarter study abroad program, "Staging the City: Rome and the Performance of Power." Students will earn 15 credits of Honors (Honors 230 (10), and Honors 391 (5)) or Drama credits (Drama 499).

Alternative credit may be available; this must be preapproved with your departmental advisers.

Information sessions will be held on:
  • Monday, Oct. 3, 3:00 p.m., MGH 206, Honors Multipurpose Room
  • Wed, Oct. 5, 11:00 a.m., MGH 211B, Honors Seminar room

"Rome: Performing Power in the City" will use 2,000 years of performance traditions, literature, painting, and architecture to consider how Rome created, maintained, and circulated its own image of imperial and cultural power first as the heart of the Roman Empire, then as the capital of Catholic Christendom, later as a city of Papal Princes, and the epicenter of high culture on any European tour, and finally, under Mussolini, as the site of the new (Old) Empire.

How Rome occupied its unique charismatic position in European history is largely a product of its own self-promotion. Rome the city invented Rome the ideal, fashioned and re-fashioned itself across the centuries, and those acts of invention can be read as a powerful performance of civic identity. Combining the architecture of the city with plays, art, pageants, spectacles, gladiatorial games and opera, all staged to promote the values of Rome, we consider how the city fashioned its own identity as the center of power and culture from Classical Empire through the Enlightenment, to the restoration of empire under Mussolini: Roma Eterna, remained eternal by re-staging itself.

The course will include excursions to main historical sites of the city with instruction in both ancient and contemporary art in Rome and the surrounding area. A sampling of excursions may include: the Pantheon, Vatican City, the Colosseum, E.U.R., Contemporary Art Museum, the Forum, and Ostia Antica. Rome is centrally located and the class will take advantage of day and over night trips to Florence, Sienna, and possibly Naples.

Odai Johnson, Department of Drama, University of Washington

odai@uw.edu

Associate Professor in theatre history and head of the Ph.D. program, Odai Johnson took his MFA from the University of Utah and his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin. His articles have appeared in Theatre Journal, Theatre Survey, New England Theatre Journal, Theatre Symposium and the Virginia Magazine of History as well as contributions to numerous anthologies. His books include Rehearsing the Revolution (University of Delaware 1999), The Colonial American Stage: A Documentary Calendar (AUP: 2001) and Absence and Memory on the Colonial American Stage (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2005). He is currently finishing a work on classical theatre, titled Ruins. Professor Johnson is the director of the UW's Center for Performance Studies and a Donald E. Petersen endowed fellow.

http://depts.washington.edu/uwdrama/people/faculty_johnson.shtml

Patricia Gaborik, Medici Institute, Rome, Italy

Patricia Gaborik holds a bachelor's degree in theatre from Northwestern University, a Master's in Dramatic Arts from the University of California - Santa Barbara, and a PhD in Theatre history and criticism with a minor in Italian studies from the University of Wisconsin. In 2005-06, she was the Paul Mellon postdoctoral fellow in Modern Italian studies at the American Academy in Rome. Patricia's scholarship on topics as diverse as theatrical translation, dialect theatre, futurism, fascism, and the modernist playwright Massimo Bontempelli can be found in the journals Metamorphoses and Modern Drama and the editions National Theatres in a Changing Europe, Avant-Garde Performance and Material Exchange and the forthcoming Atlante storico della letteratura italiana. Patricia is also a playwright: her latest work, Finishing the Kitchen, was given its world premier in 2010 by The English Theatre of Rome. At LdM, she teaches courses in Italian Literature, Italy in the Grand Tour, and Shakespeare.

Rome: Performing Power in the City - Honors 230 (5 credits)

Using 2,000 years of performance traditions, literature, painting, and architecture, this course considers how Rome created, maintained, and circulated its own image of imperial and cultural power first as the heart of the Roman Empire, then as the capital of Catholic Christiandom, later as a city of Papal Princes, and the epicenter of high culture on any European tour. How Rome occupied its unique charismatic position in European history is largely a product of its own self-promotion. Rome the city invented Rome the ideal, fashioned and re-fashioned itself across the centuries, and those acts of invention can be read as a powerful performance of civic identity. Combining the architecture of the city with plays, art, pageants, spectacles, gladiatorial games and opera, all staged to promote the values of Rome, we consider how the city fashioned its own identity as the center of power and culture from Classical Empire through the Enlightenment, to the restoration of empire under Mussolini: Roma Eterna, remained eternal by re-staging itself.

Fascism and Spectacle: The Return to Empire - Honors 230 (5 credits)

At the time of Italy's unification, a politician famously said, "Italy has been made, it's time to make Italians." This course, a journey through both space and time, investigates how the city of Rome, as capital and home to political leaders and the Vatican, has functioned as both battleground for and symbol of these very real (and often violent) attempts to make and remake the Nation and its inhabitants. In other words, combining classroom lectures and walking tours, the class will explore how Rome -- its urban design, its architecture, its museums and monuments, even its poster-papered walls -- tells the story of modern Italy. The centerpiece of the course will be the Fascist period (1922-1945), when efforts to redesign the city were numerous, varied, and planned in exquisite detail, but we will also briefly discuss the Unification period (the mid-late 1800s), the post-war economic boom and the ensuing "red" terrorism (1950s-70s), and the papacy and the presidency in the Mass media age (the 1980s--present).

Independent Research in Rome - Honors 397 (2 credits)

This course is a companion to the 10 credit core courses taught by Johnson and Gaborik. Students will work in small research groups and present research projects at the end of the quarter. Students will also be required to write up the project on individual blogs (15 pages, approx).

Introduction to Italian - Honors 397 (3 credits)

Students will be encouraged to use the Italian language while in Rome. Students will attend Italian classes that will familiarize them with idiomatic expressions, the basic rules of grammar and proper pronunciation and enable them to navigate Rome and engage in the themes of the course, and the associated research and internships, with more confidence.

Cost

$7,650: This does not include IPE Fee ($250), airfare, food (about $50/day), Study Abroad Insurance ($37/month) and personal spending money.

Average Airplane Ticket Price

$1,200 - 1,500* roundtrip *Subject to when & where you buy your ticket

Payment Schedule

Program fees will be posted to your MyUW student account and can be paid the same way that you pay tuition and other fees. A $350 non-refundable program deposit and $250 non-refundable IPE Fee will be charged to your MyUW Account once your signed contract has been received by the Study Abroad Office.

Payment Type Payment Amount Payment Due Date
Non-Refundable Program Deposit $350 Charged Upon Receipt of Contract
Non-Refundable IPE Fee $250 1/20/2012
Program Fee Balance $7,300 1/20/2012
TOTAL FEES CHARGED $7,900  

Financial Aid

Most forms of financial aid can be applied to study abroad. You can verify that your financial aid award will apply to your program costs by contacting the Financial Aid Office. Financial aid or scholarships awarded as tuition waivers or tuition exemptions may not apply so you will need to verify that these funds are eligible for use with study abroad by contacting the funding office.

Revision Request

You can request an increase in your financial aid award (typically in loan funds) from the Financial Aid Office if the cost of the program exceeds the regular budgeted amount for a student living in the Seattle area. To do this, you will need to submit the following paperwork to the Financial Aid Office:

  1. Revision Request Form
  2. Summer Application for Financial Aid (scroll to bottom of page)
  3. Budget of student expenses for your program: e-mail ipe@uw.edu

Disbursement

Please remember that financial aid and most scholarships will be disbursed according to the UW academic calendar (at the beginning of the quarter). If your program starts before the start of the UW quarter, your financial aid will not be available to you until after you have left the country. If your program starts after the first day of the quarter, your financial aid will be disbursed on the first day of the program. In either of these cases, you will have to finance any upfront costs such as airfare and health insurance and the start of your time abroad on your own. Please take this into consideration when you plan your foreign study.

Short-term Loans

The Financial Aid Office does have a Short-Term Loan Program to assist students with temporary cash flow problems. To be eligible, students must be currently enrolled in regular classes in the UW Student Database. For students studying abroad during summer quarter will need to apply for a short term loan before the end of Spring Quarter.

Scholarships

There are funding opportunities through the Global Opportunities Program, and the Office of International Programs and Exchanges maintains a list of funding opportunities.

Withdrawals

The $350 program deposit and $250 IPE Fee are non-refundable. Students withdrawing from a program will be liable a percentage of the program fee depending on the date of withdrawal. More details about the withdrawal policy will be included in your payment contract. No part of the program fee is refundable once the program has begun. The date of withdrawal is considered the date (business day) a withdrawal form is received by the Study Abroad Office. Notice of withdrawal from the program must be made in writing, following the following steps:

  1. Provide notice in writing to the program director that you will no longer be participating in the program for which you have signed a contract and accepted a slot.
  2. Submit a signed withdrawal form to the Study Abroad Office, 459 Schmitz Hall.

To Rome

Participants are responsible for making their own travel arrangements to and from Rome.

In Italy

Students and instructors will take an overnight trip (TBA) and there will also be several day-excursions. The program fee covers these group travel expenses. Students will also have opportunities to travel on their own for two or three day-jaunts.

All participants must have a passport that is valid for not only for the duration of the program, but for 6 months after the program ends. It may take as long as six weeks to obtain or renew a passport.

Check out the following resources to find out more:

If you are interested in the Honors program in Rome, please fill out the on-line application.

Selection to the program is competitive and acceptance into the program will be decided based on application materials, interviews, and student's demonstrated motivation to challenge themselves intellectually across academic disciplines and cultures and to work both individually and in groups. No performance or art history experience is necessary or required. We are seeking students from various backgrounds. The Rome faculty and the Honors Program will determine final acceptance.

Applications are due October 7, 2011. The application includes a Personal Statement, 3 short answer questions, 2 Faculty recommendations and electronic signature documents related to University policies and expectations for study abroad. Following the on-line application process students may be contacted by the Program Director for an in-person interview.

General questions about academic components contact the program director, Odai Johnson, odai@uw.edu.

For financial aid questions, application process, or general study abroad questions, contact Lauren Easterling, laurenee@uw.edu.

For topics such as credits and Honors core requirements, contact:

Julie Villegas (villegas@uw.edu)
University of Washington Honors Program
211 Mary Gates Hall
Box 352800
Seattle, WA 98195
(206) 543-7444
uwhonors@uw.edu

A unit within Undergraduate Academic Affairs
211 Mary Gates Hall : Box 352800 : Seattle, WA 98195-2800
206.543.7444 : 206.543.6469 FAX
uwhonors@uw.edu
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