Curator, Warren Anatomical Museum
Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

"Ultimately, I most enjoy being part of a continuum. Museums, theoretically, exist in perpetuity and as a manager of a collection, it can be a privilege to play a part, even if small considering the percentage of time, in growing the utility of the museum and preserving its collection for future exploration."

1. What do you like most about your current position?
It's hard for me to pin down. I really do enjoy my work. It's wonderful being part of such an old collection [established 1847] and tied to an institution with such historical legacy [Harvard Medical School]. The discovery process is so enriching and the history of medicine is a wonderfully dynamic subject. I'm always learning new and amazing things.
 
Ultimately, I most enjoy being part of a continuum. Museums, theoretically, exist in perpetuity and as a manager of a collection, it can be a privilege to play a part, even if small considering the percentage of time, in growing the utility of the museum and preserving its collection for future exploration.

2. What classes or experiences (field trips, internships, ...) did you enjoy the most while in the Museology Program?
I loved my internship at MOHAI. The people there were so welcoming and willing  to teach. I processed my first collection there, typewriters, and that experience continues to stick with me. I've experienced wonderful collections since graduating but I'm always thinking about those typewriters.
 
My thesis work also had some moments of real joy. It afforded me the opportunity to investigate unique museum collections and spaces that I love like the Mount Angel Abbey Museum and the Porcelain Room at SAM.
 
3. What skills from your museology degree have been most useful in your current position?
Collection management. It's the core of my job and a strength of the program.
 
4. What advice do you have for current or future museology students?
Don't be afraid to specialize The museum jobs that surface are usually for educators, curators, registrars, administrators, etc. Discover what you like early and tailor with internships and thesis work to that type of position.
 
Embrace technology, especially digital surrogate pathways for objects. As the broad electronic information network continues to burgeon in a largely unregulated, uncurated way our communities will have great need for tangible proof of the authentic. Museums serve that need but must increase the breadth and depth of their content dissemination.
 
5. What is your favorite museum, exhibit, or museum experience?
That is a hard question for me to answer. Growing up two museums had the greatest influence on me, the New York State Museum in Albany, NY and the Wilson Museum in Castine, ME. I also loved the old Barnes Museum and the Frye Art Museum in Seattle is another personal favorite. In Boston I'm a frequent visitor of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum.