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A 17-acre public park of forested ravines and largely seasonal watercourses in a residential urban setting of Seattle. Trails provide access to natural areas but the vegetation of gaps and understories is dominated by non-native species (e.g., English ivy, reed canarygrass). The park faces considerable ongoing human impacts from onsite access as well as off site factors such as stormwater runoff from surrounding neighborhoods.

2000 - 2001   |   2001 - 2002

2001 - 2002
 
Project name
Frink Park: forested slope and riparian restoration
Location
Seattle
Client
Friends of Frink Park, City of Seattle Parks and Recreation Department
Students
J. Sausman (UW Bothell; Environmental Science), L. Mollot (UW Seattle; Forest Resources), S. Orr, K. Durance (UW Seattle; Biology - Botany)
Site description
a 0.6-acre slope leading from a major public road that bisects the park down into a steep ravine with an intermittent stream. The forested slopes were dominated a sparse overstory of native deciduous and evergreen trees, but the understory and gap areas were dominated by species-poor non-native assemblages.
Restoration challenge
Clients wished to remove non-native species from the slope and streamside and restore the area to a structurally and species diverse native plant community. Stabilizing the steep slope and streambanks, as well as establishing a water quality monitoring program were additional important objectives.
Restoration approach
UW-REN students, working with community members and students from Garfield High School, removed non-native species from the slope and stream areas and planted native species. Native trees, shrubs, grasses, and herbs were added along with mechanical barriers and mulch for weed control with a focus on species to (1) rapidly establish a shade canopy to control invasion by non-native species, (2) promote succession to a mature evergreen forest community (inplanting), (3) create structural diversity in the vegetation for habitat, (4) create slope and streambank stability through rapid root development. Bioengineering approaches and woody debris were used to address slope and streambank stability.
2000 - 2001
 
Project name
Frink Park: forested slope and riparian restoration
Location
Seattle
Client
Friends of Frink Park, City of Seattle Parks and Recreation Department
Students
K. Brown, K. Hall (UW Bothell; Environmental Science), P. King (UW Seattle; Environmental Studies), S. Rolfe (non-matriculated)
Site description
a 0.5-acre wetland in the bottom of one of the park ravines with a seasonal stream. The wetland was dominated by species-poor non-native assemblages (e.g., yellow flag iris, reed canarygrass, Himalayan blackberry, English ivy).
Restoration challenge
Clients wished to remove non-native species from the wetland and surrounding upland edge and restore the area to a structurally and species diverse native plant community. Stabilizing the soil exposed to the seasonal (and storm sensitive) stream and establishing a water quality monitoring program were additional important objectives.
Restoration approach
UW-REN students, working with community members and students from Garfield High School, removed non-native species from the wetland and planted native species. Native trees, shrubs, grasses, and herbs were added with a focus on species to (1) rapidly establish a shade canopy to control invasion by non-native species, (2) compete effectively with non-native wetland plant species, (3) promote succession to a mature evergreen forest community (inplanting) and, (4) create structural diversity in the vegetation for habitat, (4) create slope and streambank stability through rapid root development. Mulch was added to retard reinvasion of non-native species.