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Swamp Creek originates in South Everett, Snohomish County. While the upper reaches still have some large good-quality wetlands and high-quality salmonid spawning and rearing habitat, much of the creek is threatened by development. The creek flows roughly 10.9 miles southward into King County, where it empties into the Sammamish River just upstream of its outlet into Lake Washington. The basin is approximately 15,000 acres, and roughly 52 percent of the drainage is impervious and 19 percent forested cover.

2004 -2005  |   2005 -2006

 

2005 - 2006
 
Project name
Swamp Creek: Native Plant Protection Area
Location
Lynnwood, Snohomish County
Client
Scott Moore, Snohomish County Public Works Department Surface Water Management
Students
Nancy Toenyan, Cheryl Brammer, Jeremy Bunn, Clarke Thurmon
Site description
The site contains approximately 200 lineal feet of the Swamp Creek stream, which is dedicated as a Native Growth Protection Area. The focus of the project is located on the southern terminus of last year's site, and is approximately 150 feet wide. The site is a partially forested stream corridor, the right bank and buffer are compromised by well established Himalayan blackberry and reed canary grass populations.
Restoration challenge
Clients wished to create a diverse native plant assemblage alongside the stream to promote habitat and streambank protection. The students were to continue the efforts of last year's group and establish riparian, wetland, and upland plant communities, as well as provide maintenance for the previous year's project. Increased community support and involvement was also sought this year.
Restoration approach
UW-REN students, working with Snohomish County Public Works Department, removed non-native species from the site. Students created site maps and a baseline vegetation report for the new restoration site. Bioengineering with native plants and woody debris was used to stabilize the streambank. Native trees, shrubs, grasses, and herbs were added along with mechanical barriers and mulch for weed control with a focus on species that would attract wildlife, compete with non-native species and serve as a "bio-filter" to improve water quality. Plant communities were installed to fit the varying hydrology and topography across the site.
2004 - 2005
 
Project name
Swamp Creek: Native Plant Protection Area
Location
Lynnwood, Snohomish County
Client
Scott Moore, Snohomish County Public Works Department Surface Water Management
Students
E. Christensen, J. Erickson (UW Bothell, Environmental Science), M. Darrow (UW Bothell, Technology and Environment), E. Hastings, P. Hovet, Y. Stepp, and S. Torgerson (UW Bothell, Interdisciplinary Arts and Science)
Site description
The site contains approximately 500 lineal feet of the Swamp Creek stream, which is dedicated as a Native Growth Protection Area. The focus of the project is located on the west bank buffer, and is approximately 100 feet wide. The site is a partially forested stream corridor, the right bank and buffer are compromised by well established Himalayan blackberry and reed canary grass) populations, as well as spreading clumps of Japanese knotweed.
Restoration challenge
Clients wished to create a diverse native plant assemblage alongside the stream to promote habitat and streambank protection. The students were to establish riparian, wetland, and upland plant communities adding species and structural diversity to existing riparian community with long term view increasing mature conifer density and large woody debris recruitment.
Restoration approach
UW-REN students, working with Snohomish County Public Works Department, community members and local school children, removed non-native species from the riparian zone. Bioengineering with native plants and woody debris was used to stabilize the streambank. Native trees, shrubs, grasses, and herbs were added along with mechanical barriers and mulch for weed control with a focus on species that would attract wildlife. Communities were installed to fit the varying hydrology and topography across the site.