UW-REN home

Minor *new*

Certificate
- Requirements
- Application

Capstone
- Current projects
- Past projects
- Courses
- Roles & responsibilites
- Client information

Restoration resources
- At UW
- Community Resources

- News & events
- Volunteer!

- Info for alumni

Contact UW-REN

Support UW-REN


A 54-acre natural area on the University of Washington Seattle campus that encompasses a mosaic of shoreline wetlands on Lake Washington, ponds, and rolling uplands. The site provides a resource for research and teaching to the university as well as a site for the public to engage in nature study and passive recreation. UW-REN restoration projects have focused on the 7-acre east basin section.

2000 - 2001   |   2001 - 2002   |   2002 - 2003   |   2003 - 2004  |   2004 -2005  |   2005 -2006

 

2005 - 2006
 
Project name

Union Bay Natural Area: east basin

Location
University of Washington, Seattle campus
Client
UW Center for Urban Horticulture, Barbara Selemon
Students
Phil Chi (UW Seattle; CFR graduate student Ecosystem Analysis), Corinna Pinzari (UW Seattle, Ecological and Evolutionary Biology), Ivona Kaczynski (UW Seattle; Wildlife Biology), Scott Havill (University of Oregon graduate, Biology)
Site description

a small central wetland that has been planted with willow and other native plants by previous capstone classes. Focus was on an area recently mowed of Himalayan blackberry. A walking trail had been outlined and created.

Restoration challenge
To immediately respond to blackberry re-establishment and assess, maintain and enhance previous years' plantings. Maintain a good relationship with the surrounding Laurelhurst community by inviting community members to play a part in the project.
Restoration approach
This project was an extension of the previous 5 years’ projects in the east basin. UW-REN students, working with the Center for Urban Horticulture staff and community members, removed blackberry and its roots. To mitigate for wildlife habitat loss resulting from blackberry removal, numerous native plants were installed and the blackberry canes were used for habitat structure. A native garden bed was installed to beautify the appearance of the site for the benefit of the Laurelhurst community.
2004 - 2005
 
Project name

Union Bay Natural Area: east basin central graminoid wetlands

Location
University of Washington, Seattle campus
Client
UW Center for Urban Horticulture
Students
T. Parise, J. Wartes, and P. Petra (UW Bothell; Environmental Science), D. Fletcher and M. Schweitzer (UW Seattle; Forest Resources), D. Clark-Rixmann (UW Seattle; Anthropology), A. Lindermuth (UW Seattle; Landscape Architecture)
Site description
a small central wetland dominated by the non-native reed canarygrass in the midst of a forested wetland area. This site was in the middle of the loop trail established in earlier east basin projects.
Restoration challenge
Client wishes to restore entire 7-acre section of the east basin to diverse assemblages of native plant communities appropriate to the varying hydrologic conditions found throughout the basin for research, teaching, habitat, and public enjoyment while taking into consideration the concerns of the surrounding community. Focused public access and interpretation are important components.
Restoration approach
This project was an extension of the previous 4 years’ projects in the east basin. UW-REN students, working with the center for Urban Horticulture staff and community members, removed non-native reed canarygrass from a central herbaceous meadow. Native woody and non-woody species were added along with mechanical barriers for weed control with a focus on species to (1) rapidly establish a shade canopy to control reinvasion by reed canarygrass and other species, (2) compete with reinvading non-native species, and (3) create structural and species diversity in the vegetation for wildlife habitat.
2003 - 2004
 
Project name

Union Bay Natural Area: east basin

Location
University of Washington, Seattle campus
Client
UW Center for Urban Horticulture
Students
L. Davis and K. Shimada (UW Seattle; Landscape Architecture), C. Girardin and S. Johnson (UW Seattle; Forest Resources), A. Grant and C. Papiez (UW Seattle; Biology – Botany)
Site description
an upland slope overgrown with a monoculture of a non-native shrub (Himalayan blackberry) adjacent to a public road leading down to a lakeshore wetland with seasonally-variable hydrology. The wetland has areas of dense infestation by non-native plant species but much of it is a moderate diversity mosaic of native deciduous trees and shrubs with patches of non-native species.
Restoration challenge

Client wishes to restore entire 7-acre section of the east basin to diverse assemblages of native plant communities appropriate to the varying hydrologic conditions found throughout the basin for research, teaching, habitat, and public enjoyment while taking into consideration the concerns of the surrounding community. Focused public access and interpretation are important components.

Restoration approach

This project was an extension of the previous 3 years’ projects in the east basin. UW-REN students, working with the center for Urban Horticulture staff and community members, removed non-native species. Native trees, shrubs, grasses, and herbs were added along with mechanical barriers for weed control with a focus on species to (1) rapidly establish a shade canopy to control reinvasion by reed canarygrass and other species, (2) promote development of native upland associations and wetlands in concert with the varying hydrologic conditions, and (3) create structural and species diversity in the vegetation for wildlife habitat, particularly in the wooded areas. The loop interpretive trail begun in the previous year’s project was completed.

2002 - 2003
 
Project name

Union Bay Natural Area: east basin

Location
University of Washington, Seattle campus
Client
UW Center for Urban Horticulture
Students
J. Tracy and J. Chan (UW Seattle; Environmental Horticulture), K. Buitrago (UW Seattle; Sustainable Resource Sciences), A. Bond (UW Seattle; Biology – Botany), R. Hicks (UW Bothell; Environmental Science)
Site description

an upland slope overgrown with a monoculture of a non-native shrub (Himalayan blackberry) adjacent to a public road leading down to a lakeshore wetland with seasonally-variable hydrology. The wetland has areas of dense infestation by non-native plant species but much of it is a moderate diversity mosaic of native deciduous trees and shrubs with patches of non-native species.

Restoration challenge

Client wishes to restore entire 7-acre section of the east basin to diverse assemblages of native plant communities appropriate to the varying hydrologic conditions found throughout the basin for research, teaching, habitat, and public enjoyment while taking into consideration the concerns of the surrounding community. Focused public access and interpretation are important components.

Restoration approach
This project was an extension of the previous 2 years’ projects in the east basin. UW-REN students, working with the center for Urban Horticulture staff and community members, removed non-native species. Native trees, shrubs, grasses, and herbs were added along with mechanical barriers for weed control with a focus on species to (1) rapidly establish a shade canopy to control reinvasion by reed canarygrass, (2) promote development of native upland associations and wetlands in concert with the varying hydrologic conditions, (3) create structural diversity in the vegetation for wildlife habitat, and (4) delineate and provide interpretative opportunities along a public access trail. A public access trail begun the previous year was further constructed and more interpretation provided for key species and communities installed.
2001 - 2002
 
Project name
Union Bay Natural Area: east basin northwest sector
Location
University of Washington, Seattle campus
Client
UW Center for Urban Horticulture
Students
M. Ramsay (UW Seattle; Environmental Horticulture), M. Leighton (UW Seattle; Civil Engineering), S, French (UW Bothell; Environmental Science), T. Abrahamson and R. Mertz (UW Tacoma; Environmental Science)
Site description
an upland slope overgrown with a monoculture of a non-native shrub (Himalayan blackberry) adjacent to a public road leading down to a lakeshore wetland with seasonally-variable hydrology. The wetland section for this project is strongly infested with a non-native grass (reed canarygrass).
Restoration challenge
Client wishes to restore entire 7-acre section of the east basin to diverse assemblages of native plant communities appropriate to the varying hydrologic conditions found throughout the basin for research, teaching, habitat, and public enjoyment while taking into consideration the concerns of the surrounding community. Focused public access and interpretation are important components.
Restoration approach
This project was an extension of the 2000-2001 east basin project. UW-REN students, working with the center for Urban Horticulture staff and community members, removed non-native species. Native trees, shrubs, grasses, and herbs were added along with mechanical barriers for weed control with a focus on species to (1) rapidly establish a shade canopy to control reinvasion by reed canarygrass, (2) promote development of native upland associations and wetlands in concert with the varying hydrologic conditions, (3) create structural diversity in the vegetation for wildlife habitat, and (4) delineate and provide interpretative opportunities along a public access trail. A public access trail was constructed and interpretation provided for key species installed. The experimental matrix of the 2000-2001 project was extended for testing effectiveness of different weed control approaches – information to be used in future east basin restorations.
2000 - 2001
 
Project name
Union Bay Natural Area: east basin northwest sector
Location
University of Washington, Seattle campus
Client
UW Center for Urban Horticulture
Students
L. Brooks (UW Seattle; Environmental Horticulture), C. Lander, M. Durkin, and C. Manriquez (UW Seattle; Forest Resources), T. Littlefield (UW Seattle; Sustainable Resource Sciences), B. Wunderlich, P. Manning, and R. Cartwright (UW Bothell; Environmental Science), K. Hemmelgarn (UW Tacoma; Environmental Science)
Site description
an upland slope overgrown with a monoculture of a non-native shrub (Himalayan blackberry) adjacent to a public road leading down to a lakeshore wetland with seasonally-variable hydrology. The wetland section for this project is strongly infested with a non-native grass (reed canarygrass).
Restoration challenge
Client wishes to restore entire 7-acre section of the east basin to diverse assemblages of native plant communities appropriate to the varying hydrologic conditions found throughout the basin for research, teaching, habitat, and public enjoyment while taking into consideration the concerns of the surrounding community. Focused public access and interpretation are important components.
Restoration approach
UW-REN students, working with the center for Urban Horticulture staff and community members, removed non-native species. Native trees, shrubs, grasses, and herbs were added along with mechanical barriers for weed control with a focus on species to (1) rapidly establish a shade canopy to control reinvasion by reed canarygrass, (2) promote development of native upland associations and wetlands in concert with the varying hydrologic conditions, and (3) create structural diversity in the vegetation for habitat. Communities were planted in an experimental matrix for testing effectiveness of different weed control approaches – information to be used in future east basin restorations.