Washington State Nutrition & Physical Activity Plan
Physical Activity Obj. 2
: Physical Activity Opportunities for Children
References

Introductory Section

  1. Institute of Medicine Committee on Prevention of Obesity in Children and Youth. Kaplah JP, Liverman CT, Kraak VI, eds. Preventing Childhood Obesity: Health in the Balance. Washington, DC: Institute of Medicine, 2005.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Physical Activity for Everyone: Recommendations: Young People. Available: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/physical/recommendations/young.htm. Accessed August 1, 2007.
  3. United States Department of Agriculture. Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005. Available: http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/chapter4.htm. Accessed August 1, 2007.
  4. National Association for Sport and Physical Education. Physical Activity for Children: A Statement of Guidelines for Children Ages 5 - 12, 2nd Edition. Available: http://www.aahperd.org/naspe/standards/nationalGuidelines/PA-Children-5-12.cfm.
  5. National Association for Sport and Physical Education. Physical Activity for Children: A Statement of Guidelines for Children Birth to 5 Years, 2nd Edition. Available: http://www.aahperd.org/naspe/standards/nationalGuidelines/ActiveStart.cfm.
  6. Sallis JF, Glanz K. The Role of Built Environments in Physical Activity, Eating, and Obesity in Childhood. Future Child. 2006; 16:89-108.
  7. Story M, Kaphingst KM, French S. The Role of Schools in Obesity Prevention. Future Child. 2006; 16:109-142.
  8. Promoting Better Health for Young People-Report to the President from the Secretary of Education and the Secretary of Health and Human Services-2000). pdf

 

Priority Recommendation A

  1. Flynn MA, McNeil DA, Maloff B, et al. Reducing obesity and related chronic disease risk in children and youth: a synthesis of evidence with “best practice” recommendations. Obes Rev 2006; 7(Suppl.1):7-66.
  2. Le Masurier GL, Corbin CB. Top 10 Reasons for Quality Physical Education. JOPERD 2006; 77:44-53
  3. National Association for Sport and Physical Education. Moving into the Future: National Standards for Physical Education, 2nd Edition. Available: http://www.aahperd.org/naspe/standards/nationalStandards/PEstandards.cfm
  4. National Association for Sport and Physical Education. Standards for Appropriate Practice. Available: http://www.aahperd.org/naspe/standards/nationalGuidelines/Apppracticedoc.cfm.
  5. Curtner-Smith, M Sofo S, Chouinard J, Wallace S. Health-promoting physical activity and extra-curricular sport. Euro Phys Ed Rev 2007; 13:131-144.
  6. Kahn EB, Ramsey LT, Brownson RC, et. al. The Effectiveness of Interventions to Increase Physical Activity: A Systematic Review. Am J Prev Med 2002; 22(4S):73-107.
  7. Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Guidelines for school and community programs to promote lifelong physical activity among young people. MMWR Recomm Rep March 1997; 46(RR-6):1-36. Available: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/RR/RR4606.pdf .

 

Priority Recommendation B

  1. Jago R, Baranowski T. Non-curricular approaches for increasing physical activity in youth: a review. Prev Med 2004;39:157-163.
  2. Pate RR, Davis MG, Robinson TN, et al. Promoting Physical Activity in Children and youth: A Leadership Role for Schools: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism. Circulation 2006; 114:1214-1224.
  3. Model School Wellness Policies. National Alliance for Nutrition and Physical Activity. Available: http://www.schoolwellnesspolicies.org. Accessed August 1, 2007.
  4. Institute of Medicine Committee on Prevention of Obesity in Children and Youth. Kaplah Jp, Liverman Ct, Kraak VI, eds. Preventing Childhood Obesity: Health in the Balance. Washington, DC: Institute of Medicine 2004:237-284.
  5. American Academy of Pediatrics, Council on Sports Medicine and Fitness and Council on School Health. Active Healthy Living: Prevention of Childhood Obesity Through Increased Physical Activity. Pediatrics 2006; 117:1834-1842.
  6. Martin SL, Lee SM, Lowry R. National Prevalence and Correlates of Walking and Bicycling to School. Am J Prev Med 2007; 33:98-105.
  7. Washington State Department of Health, Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction and Washington State Department of Social and Health Services. 2004 Healthy Youth Survey.
  8. The Center for Collaborative Solutions. Developing Exemplary Practices in Nutrition, Physical Activity and Food Security in Afterschool Programs. Available at http://www.ccscenter.org/afterschool/Exemplary%20Practices%20Guide
  9. Sallis JF, Conway TL, Prochaska JJ, et al. The Association of School Environments With Youth Physical Activity. Am J Public Health 2001; 91:618-620.
  10. Ridgers ND, Stratton G, Fairclough SJ, Twisk JWR. Long-term effects of a playground markings and physical structures on children’s recess physical activity levels. Prev Med 2007; 44:393-397.

 

Priority Recommendation C

  1. Kaiser Family Foundation. The role of media in childhood obesity. Available: http://www.kff.org/entmedia/upload/The-Role-Of-Media-in-Childhood-Obesity.pdf. Accessed October 13, 2007.
  2. Borzekowski D, Robinson T. The 30-Second Effect: An Experiment Revealing the Impact of Television Commercials on Food Preferences in Preschoolers. J Am Diet Assoc. 2001; 101:42-46.
  3. Austin E, Chen Y, Pinkleton B, Johnson J. Benefits and Costs of Channel One in a Middle School Setting and the Role of Media Literacy Training. Pediatrics 2006; 117:e423-433
  4. Crespo C, Smit E, Troiano R, Bartlett S, Macera C, Anderson R. Television Watching, Energy Intake and Obesity in US Children. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2001; 155:360-365.
  5. US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Healthy People 2010. Available at http://www.healthypeople.gov. Accessed October 13, 2007.
  6. American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Public Education. Policy Statement-Children, Adolescents, and Television. Pediatrics 2001; 107:423-426
  7. Zimmerman F, Christakis D, Meltzoff A. Television and DVD/Video Viewing in Children Younger than 2 Years. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2007; 161:473-479.
  8. Washington State Department of Health, Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction and Washington State Department of Social and Health Services. 2006 Healthy Youth Survey.
  9. Certain L, Kahn R. Prevalence, Correlates and Trajectory of Television Viewing Among Infants and Toddlers. Pediatrics 2002; 109:634-642.
  10. Institute of Medicine Committee on Prevention of Obesity in Children and Youth. Kaplah Jp, Liverman Ct, Kraak VI, eds. Preventing Childhood Obesity: Health in the Balance. Washington, DC: Institute of Medicine. 2004; 285-318.
  11. Partners in Action web site. Smart Screen Time Special Edition. 2007. Available at http://depts.washington.edu/waaction/Issue13/index.html/
  12. New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene/NYC Health Code/Title lii Maternal, Infant, child and schools services/Article 47/Section 36.