WWAMIPRO

WWAMI Pro Recognition Program

The WWAMI Pro recognition program honors professionalism throughout our medical school community by capturing moments in time when someone has gone above and beyond in providing a respectful and supportive learning environment. Medical students are encouraged to recognize role models and teachers in their midst. Recognition can be directed toward any contributor to a student's learning environment, including attending physicians, residents, interns, other physicians, pharmacists, nurses, physician assistants, nurse practitioners and staff, such as front office staff, administrators clerks, custodial staff and security.

Individuals recognized will be notified during the next recognition cycle, and will receive a pin to wear or display. Notification to the individual will include information from this form, but will not include the nominating student's name. If additional information is needed, the student may be contacted. Only current University of Washington medical students may submit a WWAMI Pro recognition.

Want to recognize someone?

Recognition can be directed at any contributor to a student's learning environment, including attending physicians, residents, interns, other physicians, pharmacists, nurses, physician assistants, nurse practitioners and staff, such as front office staff, administrators clerks, custodial staff and security.

Submit a WWAMI Pro Recognition

How are people recognized?

Nominations will be processed quarterly, so there may be a delay between the time that you submit your nomination and the date that your nominee is recognized. The more nominations that we receive, the more individuals who will be recognized for exhibiting professionalism in our learning environment! Those nominated will receive a unique pin that was developed for the WWAMI Pro recognition program. The pin can be easily worn or displayed and identifies a nominee as a recipient of this honor. Nominees also will receive a letter summarizing the reasons for the nomination and highlighting the core professional values.

Continuous Professionalism Improvement at UW School of Medicine

The UW School of Medicine is committed to the promotion of professionalism throughout our community. To support this, the Committee for Continuous Professionalism Improvement (CPI) was created in 2007 by Dr. Paul Ramsey. The CPI is charged with overseeing and promoting professionalism throughout the medical school and all teaching sites. This diverse, engaged committee has provided a key leadership role in many efforts, including creating WWAMI Pro and the CPI Professionalism Vignettes featured below. To learn more about the CPI, please visit http://www.uwmedicine.org/about/core-values/cpi .

Jim Branahl, MD

Boise VA | Boise, ID

“I tell students: ‘Learn your patient’s story, not just their diagnosis.’ Many of our patients are elderly and have incredible stories to tell about their military service. It’s an important window into who they are - learning about our patients ultimately makes us better at what we do. The humanity of medicine is what makes it meaningful.”

LeeAnna Muzquiz, MD

Tribal Health Clinic | Polson, MT

“I am dedicated to finding ways to increase the workforce of native physicians. Whether it’s through our Tribal Health Department internship program for tribal members in college, a three day STEM-related camp for tribal middle school students, or bringing a traveling, interactive science museum from the University of Montana to our annual powwow – any place I can be involved in teaching or workforce issues, I do. ”

Greg Rice, MD

Libby Clinic | Libby, MT

“When students come to Libby to do their clerkships – especially the third year students – they’ve been in study mode for much of their life and all of a sudden the goal is less about getting good grades, and more about taking care of patients. It’s a big transition that I enjoy helping them make. One of the most important things I teach students is that they will never stop becoming a physician. It will continue for the rest of their lives.”