Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine >> Administration >> Faculty News & Awards

Faculty News and Awards
Archive: 2013-2017

Faculty at the University of Washington come from all over the world to teach, learn new techniques and conduct research. Faculty have offices and labs in many of the city's hospitals. They have a wide range of interests and residents are encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity to learn varied approaches to anesthesia practice.

The Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine is pleased to highlight a few of the recent accomplishments by its faculty.


June 2017

Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Anne Lynn

Congratulations, Dr. Anne Lynn!

Anne Lynn, MD, Professor, UW A&PM, Seattle Children's Hospital — Dr. Anne Lynn has been selected to receive the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia Myron Yaster Lifetime Achievement Award.

Anne will be honored and presented with this prestigious and well deserved award at the SPA meeting in Boston in October.




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Dr. Monica Vavilala

Congratulations, Dr. Monica Vavilala!

Monica Vavilala, MD, Professor & Director, Harborview Injury Prevention & Research Center; Professor, Pediatrics; Adjunct Professor, Neurological Surgery — New Departmental Leadership Position – Vice Chair for Strategic Affairs

Dr. Monica Vavilala has agreed to serve in this new position. The primary duty of the VCSA is to work with the chair, A&PM faculty, and other institutional leaders to define priorities and strategic initiatives for the department and work towards operationalizing them. Dr. Vavilala will officially begin as VCSA July 1, 2017. We should all congratulate Dr. Vavilala on her new role and if asked, meet with her so that she can learn from you what should be considered in our strategic priorities. — M. Crowder


Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Mark Opp

Congratulations, Dr. Mark Opp!

Mark R. Opp, PhD, Professor & Vice Chair, Basic Research, HMC —
"Dr. Mark Opp has announced that he will be leaving UW in August to assume a faculty position at the University of Colorado Boulder as Professor of Integrative Physiology. I want to thank Dr. Opp for his seven years of service to the department as Vice Chair of Basic Research. Under his guidance, the department has enhanced its position as a leader in Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine Research and is now ranked 6th in the US in NIH dollars, one metric of the quality of our research portfolio." - M. Crowder

 
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Dr. Margaret Sedensky

Congratulations, Dr. Margaret M. Sedensky, MD!

Margaret M. Sedensky, MD, Professor, AP&M, UWMC —
"Dr. Margaret Sedensky has agreed to assume the VC of Basic Research position, effective July 1st. We are lucky to have someone in the department of the caliber of Dr. Sedensky to assume this role. She has been continuously funded by the NIH for 28 years and has mentored numerous graduate students, medical students, fellows, and faculty in research. Please join me in congratulating Dr. Sedensky in her new role as VC of Basic Research." — M. Crowder


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Dr. Jeremy Geiduschek

Congratulations, Dr. Jeremy Geiduschek!

Jeremy Geiduschek, MD, Clinical Professor, AP&M, Seattle Children's Hospital —
"I am very happy to announce that Dr. Jeremy Geiduschek has agreed to serve permanently as the Chief of the Department of Pediatric Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine at Seattle Children’s Hospital and Chief of the Division of Pediatric Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine in our department. This appointment is effective as of May 10. As part of his agreement with the department, Seattle Children’s, and their affiliated Research Institute, Dr. Geiduschek will have additional resources to enhance our clinical, scholarly, and educational missions and will be working with many of you in the near future to expand our impact in these areas. Please join me in congratulating Dr. Geiduschek for strengthening our partnership with Seattle Children’s Hospital and for his appointment as Chief." — M. Crowder



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Dr. Neels Groenewald

Congratulations, Dr. Neels Groenewald!

Cornelius (Neels) Groenewald, MBChB, Assistant Professor, A&PM, Seattle Children's Hospital — Dr. Groenewald recently received an Early Career Research Grant from the IASP (International Association for the Study of Pain).
Award amount: $20,000.
Project title:
“Phenotype and genotype correlates underlying the temporal relationship between adolescent chronic pain and prescription opioid misuse in adulthood.”

IASP is the major international pain research society and was started at UW by John Bonica in 1973. This grant is internationally competitive and IASP awards 4-8 grants each year to early career pain investigators from all world regions.



Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Michele Curatolo

Congratulations, Dr. Michele Curatolo!

Michele Curatolo, MD, PhD, Professor, A&PM, UW Medical Center — Dr. Curatolo was bestowed the “John Joseph Bonica Ambassador Award – the Italian Excellence in Worldwide Pain Therapy” during the Simpar-ISURA Florence 2017 annual meeting that took place in Florence, Italy, March 29 – April 1, 2017.

The societies inaugurated this special award this year to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the birth of John Bonica; and Dr. Curatolo was the first recipient.

 


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Dr. Nicholas Kassebaum

Congratulations, Dr. Nick Kassebaum!

Nicholas Kassebaum, MD, Assistant Professor, A&PM, Seattle Children's Hospital — Dr. Nick Kassebaum Featured in NPR Story
The excerpted material below is from a story by Susan Brink that appeared on the npr KNKX Public Radio website (dated April 3, 2017—3:16 PM ET), in the section named “goats and soda—stories of life in a changing world.”

“The story describes the culmination of work done by a large international collaboration to study and understand what diseases cause death and illness in children and adolescents throughout the world (195 countries and territories) and how the pattern of those diseases changes by geography, age, sociodemgraphic factors, and over time.”N. Kassebaum

Child Deaths Drop From 14.2 Million In 1990 To 7.3 Million In 2015

The world is doing a much better job of keeping babies alive long enough to become children, children alive long enough to become teens and teens alive long enough to fully grow up, according to a report in today's JAMA Pediatrics."I think that the overall highlight of the report is good news," says Dr. Nicholas J. Kassebaum, an author of the report by members of the Global Burden of Disease Child and Adolescent Health Collaboration. "Without exception child mortality has improved throughout the world for the last 25 years."

But it's not all good news. The children in poor countries who might have died as babies or toddlers a few years ago live long enough to suffer from the effects of birth defects or develop mental health problems or cancer. And increasingly, they live long enough to bear the burden of war and violence in their countries. We talked with Kassebaum, of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington in Seattle, about how child and adolescent health has changed since 1990.

First the good news: Deaths of children and adolescents to age 19 were nearly cut in half, from 14.2 million deaths in 1990 to 7.3 million deaths in 2015. How did that happen?
A big part of that is improvement in vaccine coverage, in care for mothers during their pregnancy and in nutrition. Beginning in about the late 1980s, there was a global mobilization around the rights of the child. That brought together experts and a lot of governments saying that children should have a right to health, to education, to a life with opportunities. There was an increase in all kinds of things: development assistance, aid for HIV, immunization efforts, and efforts to help pregnant women. It was a synergistic effort. A lot of programs focused on children under five, so for the last two decades there has been enormous progress in young children not dying as much.

A couple of countries stand out for the progress they're making: Ethiopia and Malawi, for example. What have they done to bring about improvements?
Those two countries have made improvements in clean water supplies and in better sanitation practices. They've also taken really concerted efforts in trying to reach universal vaccine coverage. They also made strides in expanding education. Not so much health education but general education. We know that if moms are more educated, that correlates with women being more likely to be involved in the workforce, with women being more empowered in their own health care and the health of their children, and more in tune with their own nutrition and that of their families. So education is not a direct link to improved childhood health, but it sets things in motion for improved health.

When children can be better protected through their first five years, what life and death challenges do they face as they grow older?
The way it's gone so far is absolutely the way it should go: really focusing on vaccines, clean water, sanitation and antenatal care. But once those are in place, and the children get older, the challenges become much more complex. You have lots of children surviving past their early years. But many of these countries may not have the necessary resources to have comprehensive childhood education. They may not be able to deal with congenital birth defects or cerebral palsy and childhood cancer and mental health disorders that start to crop up in later youth. A lot of countries are doing really well in reducing infectious diseases and providing better nutrition but haven't gotten to the point where they can manage the more complicated cases.

What kinds of complicated things happen after a child makes it safely through infancy?
It varies by location and age. In the youngest kids, a big problem is congenital birth defects, and the biggest of those is congenital heart disease, such as infants born with holes in their hearts or defects in heart valves. There's also sickle cell disease, an inherited disease of misshapen red blood cells that inhibits oxygen from reaching tissue, in sub-Saharan Africa. Those kids are more susceptible to getting sick and needing care early.

And then when you get to be older, pediatric cancer is a big problem. The treatment of common childhood cancers in the U.S. and Europe and Japan has been remarkable. But that has required a well-functioning health system. That's not available in poor countries. Even a lot of middle-income countries in Latin America have not seen improvements in the treatment of childhood cancer.

Then during adolescence, you see more injuries: road traffic accidents, drownings, self-harm and suicide are big problems. Systems are not in place to deal with immediate injuries. When girls get into adolescence, they start getting pregnant. Early teen pregnancy is still common in the developing world. Pregnancy-related death is one of the biggest risks in adolescent females.

Were there surprising findings in the report?
One thing that flies under the radar is the effect of war. In the Middle East, the biggest cause of death for all kids over the age of 5 in 2015 was the effects of war. [According to the report, "The direct mortality burden of war was extremely large in North Africa and the Middle East, where it ranked second for each sex among children aged 1 to 4 years and first in all subsequent age groups in 2015."] Then there are the long-term effects of war: PTSD, some injuries that affect children for the rest of their lives and the consequences of families being separated.

What's the purpose of a report like this, looking at the global health of children over time?
It's a kind of report card. For the last two decades, enormous progress has been made. Children under five are not dying as much. But you have to think of childhood and adolescence as a continuum. We have to continue to address the health challenges of all children and adolescents.

The complete story can be viewed on the following website:
http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2017/04/03/522466048/child-deaths-drop-from-14-2-million-in-1990-to-7-3-million-in-2015?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=storiesfromnpr

 


January 2017

Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Wil Van Cleve

Congratulations, Dr. Wil Van Cleve!

Wil Van Cleve, MD Assistant Professor; Associate Program Director & Director of Curriculum, UWMC — Dr. Van Cleve has been selected by the UW Medical Center to receive the 2017 Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Service Award. This award honors individuals or groups who exemplify Martin Luther King’s principles through:

  • Commitment to addressing community needs, particularly communities of color and low income;
  • Development and implementation of significant programs to improve the human condition;
  • Outstanding efforts to protect and empower all individuals.

The award was presented at the UWMC Martin Luther King, Jr. Birthday Celebration on Thursday, January 12.




Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Bala Nair

Congratulations, Dr. Bala Nair!

Bala Nair, PhD Research Associate Professor, UWMC — Effective July 1st, Dr. Nair, was appointed Director for the new Center for Perioperative and Pain Quality, Safety and Outcomes.

Dr. Crowder’s vision is to create a center that improves the clinical outcomes of UW Medicine perioperative and pain management care.

Bala and his team will develop and employ informatics tools and technology to define determinants of quality, safety, and patient outcomes and to impact positively those




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Dr. Tonya Palermo

Congratulations, Dr. Tonya Palermo!

Tonya Palermo, PhD, Professor and Principal Investigator, Center for Child Health, Behavior & Development, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle.

Dr. Tonya Palermo recently received an RO1 grant from NIH/NICHD:
R01HD086978-01A1, MPI: Palermo, Dampier, Stinson,  09/01/2016 – 08/31/2021

Award total: $2,398,788.

The objectives of this study are to improve pain self-management and functioning in youth with sickle cell disease by developing and testing a tailored web and smartphone-based application (iCanCope with SCD).​




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Dr. Phil Morgan
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Dr. Margaret Sedensky

Congratulations, Drs. Morgan & Sedensky!

Phil G. Morgan, MD, Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, SCH & Margaret M. Sedensky, MD Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, UWMC — On their new NIH Grant Award from the National Institutes of General Medical Sciences — Title: “Anesthetic Neurotoxicity is Controlled by ER-stress” | PI: Phil Morgan | Co-PI’s: Marge Sedensky & Nino Ramirez | Budget: $1.6 million over 4 years. | Specific Aims: (1) Test the effects of isoflurane on mTOR activation and ER-stress in the mouse; (2) Test rapamycin in mice for prevention of anesthetic neurotoxicity; (3) Perform a high throughput small molecule screen for inhibitors of anesthetic neurotoxicity.

 

 




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Dr. Monica Vavilala

Congratulations, Dr. Monica Vavilala!

Monica Vavilala, MD, P.I., — Professor of Anesthesiology & Pediatrics; Director, Harborview Injury Prevention & Research Center (HIPRC), Recently Received Grants:

  1. “Return to Learn after Concussion” — Seattle Children’s Research Institute: $26,000
  2. “Developing TBI Education for the State” — Washington State Department of Health: $11,000
  3. “Strategies to Reduce Worker Injuries” — The Boeing Company: $86,000



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Dr. Chi Fung Lee

Congratulations, Dr. Chi Fung Lee!

Chi Fung Lee, PhD — Acting Instructor, Dr. Rong Tian's Lab, South Lake Union, was recently awarded a Scientist Development grant from the American Heart Association in the amount of $210,000. Grant Period: 01/01/2017-12/31/2019.
Project Title: The Roles of Protein Acetylation in SR Calcium Homeostasis and
Diastolic Function





October – December 2016

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Dr. Michele Curatolo

Congratulations, Dr. Michele Curatolo, Co-Investigator!

Michele Curatolo, MD, PhD Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, UWMC, was recently notified of an award from the National Institute of Health (NIH) and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK).

Project: “Urinary Stone Disease Research Network: Clinical Centers (USDRN-CCs) (Collaborative U01)”

Aims − Dr. Curatolo’s part: 1) To characterize the symptom burden of ureteral stents and evaluate strategies for reducing stent-related pain, symptoms and bother; 2) To identify mechanisms of stent related pain and urinary bother.

Period of funding: September 2016 – August 2021. | Award total: $3,352,305.




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Dr. Vincent Hsieh

Congratulations, Dr. Vincent Hsieh!

Vincent Hsieh, MD, Assistant Professor at Seattle Children's Hospital, has received an Academic Enrichment Fund award of $25,000 from the Center for Clinical & Translational Research at Seattle Children’s Research Institute; in support of his research on “Validation of biomarker for anesthesia-induced brain injury in infants.” Dr Hsieh is an Assistant Professor at Seattle Children’s Hospital.




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Dr. Srdjan Jelacic
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Dr. T. Andrew Bowdle
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Dr. Bala Nair

Congratulations, Drs. Srdjan Jelacic, T. Andrew Bowdle and Bala Nair!

New CT Anesthesia Grant — SCA & ROIZEN ANESTHESIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION

Srdjan Jelacic, MD, T. Andrew Bowdle, MD, PhD and Bala Nair, PhD — “The Use of Routine Video Surveillance of the Entire Operating Room to Identify Specific Hazards and Analyze Sentinel Events from Cardiothoracic and Vascular Procedures”






















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Dr. Nick Kassebaum

Congratulations, Dr. Nick Kassebaum!

Nick Kassebaum, MD, Assistant Professor at Seattle Children's Hostpial — The following is taken from The New York Times, September 21, 2006:

Dr. Nick Kassebaum quoted—By Sabrina Travernise (Dr Kassebaum is an Assistant Professor at Seattle Children’s Hospital) Maternal Mortality Rate in U.S. Rises, Defying Global Trend, Study Finds

WASHINGTON — One of the biggest worldwide public health triumphs in recent years has been maternal mortality. Global death rates fell by more than a third from 2000 to 2015. The United States, however, is one of the few countries in the world that have gone against the grain, new data show. Its maternal mortality rate has risen despite improvements in health care and an overwhelming global trend in the other direction. The United States has become an outlier among rich nations in maternal deaths, according to data released Wednesday by the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation, a research group funded by the Gates Foundation and based at the University of Washington. There were 28 maternal deaths — defined as deaths due to complications from pregnancy or childbirth — per 100,000 births in the United States in 2013, up from 23 in 2005, the institute found. The rate in 2013, the most recent year for which the institute had detailed data for the United States, was more than triple Canada’s. The institute is projecting that the American rate dipped in the last two years to 25 by 2015. Increases were extremely rare among rich countries. In all, 24 countries had one from 2000 to 2015, including South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo, though their rates were much higher. America’s increase put it above a number of poorer countries whose rates had declined with the global trend, including Iran, Vietnam, Russia and Romania. In all, the American rate was up by more than half since 1990, according to the institute, which uses many data sources, including countries’ vital records systems, to calculate hundreds of health measures. The findings are part of a gathering body of evidence on the dismal numbers for maternal mortality among American women and how they keep getting worse. This summer, a group of researchers published an analysis that found that the maternal mortality rate had increased by 27 percent for 48 states and the District of Columbia from 2000 to 2014. In Texas, analyzed separately, it had nearly doubled. Another analysis this month looked at increases by state and found particularly high rates in the District of Columbia, New Jersey, Georgia and Arkansas, especially among black women. (The absolute rate can vary by data set, but the upward trend has been clear.)

How is it that the United States, a country with some of the most cutting-edge medical treatments, has some of the worst maternal mortality rates in the developed world? Most people imagine maternal mortality as 19th-century-style deaths such as hemorrhage in childbirth or death from eclampsia, a condition involving high blood pressure. Those types of deaths still happen, but their rate has not changed much. Instead, the increase in recent years has been driven by heart problems and other chronic medical conditions, like diabetes, which has increased sharply in the population. Researchers have theorized that an increase in obesity — particularly acute among poor black women, who have much higher rates of maternal mortality than whites — may be contributing to the problem. “The really scary thing to us is all the deaths from cardiovascular disease and heart failure,” said Dr. William Callaghan, who runs the Maternal and Infant Health Branch in the Division of Reproductive Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “It’s a quarter of all deaths. There were almost none in the remote past.” Maternal deaths are notoriously hard to count. There is often not enough detail on a death certificate to tell if the death was related to pregnancy. For example, if a woman dies from heart failure six months after she gives birth, it can sometimes take a special analysis to determine if it was pregnancy related (deaths can be counted up to a year after birth, though the vast majority happen in the first six weeks). In 2003, the federal government asked states to report in the same way, and most eventually complied. Some have argued that the United States simply keeps better track now, counting deaths that would not have been included before. But federal health officials say the increase s more than just accounting. “The rise is real,” Dr. Callaghan said. Maternal mortality was relatively flat in the 1980s and 1990s, and most experts agree that the increases began around 2000. The trend has puzzled researchers and prompted a number of states to start maternal death review boards, groups of experts who sift through the deaths and consider policy changes that might reduce them. Such boards, used in Australia, Britain and a number of other European countries, are considered crucial in understanding, and potentially reversing, the trend. But only about half the states have them.

“The first time I saw our results for the United States, I thought there must be some error,” said Dr. Nicholas J. Kassebaum, an assistant professor of anesthesiology and pain medicine at Seattle Children’s Hospital, who is the director of maternal and child health research at the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation. “I actually started looking for what went wrong in the data processing.” Dr. Kassebaum said it was possible that the United States was simply ahead of other rich countries in the fallout from its obesity epidemic and that chronic conditions could eventually figure more prominently into the maternal mortality numbers of other countries, too. The American health system is good at handling life-threatening situations during birth, such as hemorrhage, he said, but chronic conditions are different. “It can be tricky to track down what will trigger major complications such as heart failure or a blocked artery,” he said, pointing out that women of childbearing age are by definition young and very unlikely to die at all, never mind of a chronic condition. Nor was the new trend of increased pregnancy rates in older women the main driver. Dr. Kassebaum said that he did find a substantial increase in maternal mortality among women 45 and older, but that there had been increases in all age groups.

Eugene Declercq, a professor of community health sciences at the Boston University School of Public Health who has tracked maternal mortality for years, said the racial disparities in the American rates were deeply troubling, but only part of the story. “People may think this is happening because the U.S. has more minorities and poor people,” he said. “But even if you limit the analysis to whites, we would still rank behind all other industrialized countries.”





May – September 2016

Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Tonya Palermo

Congratulations, Dr. Tonya Palermo!

Tonya Palermo, PhD, Professor and Principal Investigator, Center for Child Health, Behavior & Development, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle.

Dr. Tonya Palermo was selected as new editor of the Journal of Pediatric Psychology (the flagship journal in her field).

She will serve as Editor-elect starting January 1, 2017, followed by a 5 year term as Editor, 2018-2022.




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Dr. Michele Curatolo!

Congratulations, Dr. Michele Curatolo!

Michele Curatolo, MD, PhD, Professor, Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, was appointed associate editor of Pain, the top ranked journal in pain medicine.







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Dr. Wang Wang
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Dr. Rong Tian

Congratulations, Drs. Wang Wang and Rong Tian!

Wang, Wang, MD, PhD and Rong Tian, MD, PhD — Dr. Wang’s and Tian’s review article was featured on the cover of Science Translational Medicine.

Wang W, Karamanlidis G, Tian R: Novel targets for mitochondrial medicine. Sci Transl Med. 2016 Feb 17;8(326):326rv3.

This article describes emerging mechanisms in mitochondrial biology, including protein modification, calcium ion transport, and dynamics, as potential targets for next-generation therapies.







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Dr. David Tauben
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Dr. Michele Curatolo
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Dr. Brian Theodore
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Dr. Ardith Doorenbos

Congratulations, Division of Pain Medicine!

David Tauben, MD, Michele Curatolo, MD, PhD, Brian Theodore, PhD (Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine), and Ardith Doorenbos PhD, RN (Department of Biobehavioral Nursing & Health Systems) were awarded a two-year $140,000 grant from the Mayday Fund.

The grant will explore low-cost management after spine surgery through patient educational videos,TeleCoaching and outcomes with the use of PainTracker.



































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Dr. Gary Walco

Congratulations, Dr. Gary Walco!

Gary Walco, PhD, Professor & Director of Pain Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital.

“Training of pediatric pain specialists was one of the major topics at the Pediatric Anesthesia Leadership Council meeting held in early April this year in Colorado Springs. This is a large group of Department Directors from the US and Canada. Currently 3 programs (Boston Children’s, Medical College of Wisconsin Children’s, and Cincinnati Children’s) have ACGME approved programs for advanced training in Pediatric Pain. Beginning next academic year, we will be the fourth. Combined, these programs will graduate approximately 4-7 pediatric pain specialists every year. This is significantly below the national demand as virtually every program represented at the PALC was wanting to add pediatric pain faculty in order to meet a growing and unmet demand for service.

If you did not have the opportunity to read the Op-Ed piece in the Seattle Times on April 5, 2016, by Gary Walco, the link to the website that has the full story is as follows: http://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/new-federal-initiatives-on-pain-opioids-are-silent-on-kids-under-18/.

I want to thank Gary both for his advocacy for improving the care of children with pain both by using public media to raise awareness of inequities in national policies and agendas and by working tirelessly with leaders in UW Medicine, the UW GME Office and SCH to secure all the necessary support to allow us to continue our legacy as a department committed to preventing and treating pain in children.” (From Dr. Jeremy Geiduschek’s April 10th electronic newsletter.)


Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Daniel Rubens

Congratulations, Dr. Daniel Rubens!

Daniel Rubens, MBBS, FANZCA, Associate Professor, Seattle Children's Hospital.

“Dr. Daniel Rubens was featured in the Seattle Times on April 19th. Many of us have been fortunate to be able to follow along on Dan’s trail looking for the cause of SIDS. For those receiving this newsletter who are new to our department, this all started with an idea that Dan published in a manuscript titled “Are lethal audiogenic seizures a missing link to the sudden infant death syndrome?” (Med Hypotheses. 2004;63(1):87-91.) This is just one of many great examples of work done by members of our department that started with a question which leads to a year’s-long dogged pursuit of answers that also generate new and more complex questions. Being able to ask the questions, discuss the possibilities with colleagues, and pursue the answers are just a few of the great reasons to work in academic medicine. Congratulations to Dan on embarking on the next steps of this incredible journey.” The following link will take you to the site that contains the full story from the Times: http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/health/seattle-childrens-doctor-will-test-his-sids-theory-in-study-starting-next-month/.”
(From Dr. Jeremy Geiduschek’s April 24th electronic newsletter.)


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Dr. Jennifer Rabbitts

Congratulations, Dr. Jennifer Rabbitts!

Jennifer Rabbitts, MB ChB — In April, Dr. Jennifer Rabbitts was awarded the Scan Design Foundation Innovative Pain Research Grant for her project entitled: “Development of an Internet-Delivered Psychosocial Intervention to Improve Postsurgical Pain and Health Outcomes in Youth Having Major Surgery.” This is a one year grant providing $50,000 to support the research study.

Dr. Rabbitts also received the American Pain Society 2016 Future Leaders Award — Pain Research Grant: “Understanding family psychological needs to prevent postsurgical pain in children,” at the 35th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Pain Society in May. In addition, she received recognition for her abstract: “Temporal daily associations among sleep and pain in treatment-seeking youth with acute musculoskeletal pain complaints. (A Lewandowski, J Rabbitts, L Durkin, C Zhou, T Palermo: jpain.org/article S1526-5900(16)00034-1/pdf)


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Dr. Rong Tian

Congratulations, Dr. Rong Tian!

Rong Tian, MD, PhD, Professor & Director, Mitochondria & Metabolism Center, South Lake Union, has been selected by the British Society for Cardiovascular Research to receive the prestigious Bernard and Joan Marshall Distinguished Investigator Award. The award will be presented during the BSCR Autumn Meeting 2017 at the University of Oxford. Dr. Tian will be the keynote speaker at the meeting, where the theme will be Cardiac Metabolic Disorders and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

In addition, Dr. Tian has also been selected as the recipient of the 2017 Research Achievement Award of the International Society for Heart Research (ISHR). This award recognizes an internationally prominent investigator with a sustained and distinguished record of major scientific achievements in the field of cardiovascular research. Awardees will have already had, and are expected to have, a major impact on our understanding and/or treatment of cardiovascular disease.


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Dr. Jake Sunshine
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Dr. Sam Sharar
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Dr. Ali Mokdad

Congratulations, Drs. Jake Sunshine, Sam Sharar and Ali Mokdad!

These doctors have received notice of an award from the Foundation of Anesthesia Education Research for a Mentored Research Training Grant.

Title: Trauma Anesthesia Care: an Analysis of Motor Vehicle Crash Management, Risk Factors and Costs

Mentors: Sam Sharar and Ali Mokdad

Two year early faculty award for $175,000

11 funded this year and the only health services grant funded.

Previous UW FAER Faculty Awardees – Lori Lee 2004, Greg Terman 1992, Sam Sharar and Ken Mackie - 1991


October – December 2015

Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Jennifer Rabbitts

Congratulations, Dr. Jennifer Rabbitts!

Jennifer Rabbitts, MB ChB — Dr. Rabbitts was awarded a one year grant, in the amount of $32,200 from the Translational Research Ignition Projects Program, Center for Clinical and Translational Research, Seattle Children’s Hospital for the project period: October 1, 2015—September 30, 2016, in support of her study entitled “Persistent Pain and Poor HRQOL Related to Pediatric Surgery: child, parent, and provider perspectives.”




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Dr. Emily Law

Congratulations, Dr. Emily Law!

Emily Law, PhD — On 9/25/2015, Dr. Law received an NIH award in the amount of $139,238 in support of her study on “Psychosocial and Family Risk in Pediatric Chronic Migraine.”




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Dr. Anne Lynn

Congratulations, Dr. Anne Lynn!

Anne Lynn, MD — On 8/27/2015, Dr. Lynn received a Subaward in the amount of $43,780 from a nonprofit organization in support of her study on “Neurocognitive Outcomes 5 Years after Infant Anesthesia.”




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Dr. Wang Wang

Congratulations, Dr. Wang!

Wang Wang, PhD, from the University of Washington in Seattle, is the 2015 recipient of the Gail Patrick Innovation Award. His project focuses on innovative imaging studies to examine the mechanism by which hydrogen peroxide stimulates insulin secretion and whether this mechanism is disrupted in type 2 diabetes, when β-cells fail to compensate for insulin resistance. The results may define new therapeutic targets and treatments to ameliorate type 2 diabetes symptoms and complications.

*The Gail Patrick Innovation Award is granted annually to the highest scoring Innovation Award applicant. Awardees receive $50,000 per year for 2 years to support the pursuit of an innovative idea that advances the American Diabetes Association’s efforts to prevent, treat, and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by the disease. | +From Diabetes Pro Quarterly, Fall 2015.


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Dr. David Tauben
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Dr. John Loeser
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Dr. Ardith Z. Doorenbos
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Deb Gordon, DPN

Congratulations, Drs. Tauben, Loeser, Doorenbos and Deb Gordon!

These Co-Directors have received a five-year NIH Funded Center grant for the project period: September 15, 2015—October 14, 2019, in support of their study on “NIH Center of Excellence in Pain Education.” This project will create evidence-based, learner-centered, interprofessional pain management curriculum resources to be delivered to students in all six UW health science schools, at partner universities, and nationally at professional conferences and online, in addition to other providers. APM faculty on the grant include: Brian Ross, MD, PhD; Greg Terman, MD, PhD; Heather Tick, MD; Brian Theodore, PhD; Dennis Turk, PhD; Monica Vavilala, MD; Gary Walco, PhD.






















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Dr. Mark Sullivan
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Dr. Brian Theodore

Congratulations, Drs. Sullivan and Theodore!

Mark Sullivan, MD, PhD and Brian Theodore, PhD — Drs. Mark Sullivan (PI) and BrianTheodore (Co-PI) have received a two-year grant in the amount of $700,000 from Pfizer for the project period: September 15, 2015—September 15, 2017, in support of their study on “PainTracker Self-Manager (PTSM): a web-based platform to promote and track chronic pain self-management and other treatment outcomes.” This project will develop and test PTSM, that can support multimodal care in a wide variety of specialty and primary care settings. PTSM is a tool that will help assess, engage, activate and support patient’s efforts to self manage their chronic pain in collaboration with their physicians and other providers.




Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Sanjay Bhananker

Congratulations, Dr. Bhananker!

Sanjay Bhananker, MB BS FRCA — Dr. Sanjay Bhananker has received a one-year grant in the amount of $94,214 from The Medicines Company for the project period: August 4, 2015—June 29, 2016, in support of his study on “An open label evaluation of the safety and clinical utility of the active, separated system with enhanced controller (SSEC) fentanyl 40 mcg for the management of acute postoperative pain in pediatric patients 12 to less than 18 years of age.”




Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Monica Vavilala

Congratulations, Dr. Vavilala!

Dr. Monica Vavilala, MD (PI) has received a two-year grant in the amount of $440,690 from NIH/ NINDS for the project period: September 01, 2015—August 31, 2017, in support of her study on “Vasoactive Agents and Cerebral Outcomes in Brain Injury." This research will examine whether and how choice of vasoactive agent affects brain outcomes (cerebral hemodynamics, cerebral perfusion characteristics, and the NVU) in pediatric TBI by age and sex.


Dr. Monica Vavilala (Co-PI) has also received a five-year grant in the amount of $173,745 from U Pennsyl-vania/NIH flow-through, for the project period: September 01, 2015—August 31, 2020, in support of her study on “Pressor Choice Influences Protection of Autoregulation in Brain Injury.” This proposal leverages translational expertise in relation to children with TBI and fosters bi-directional translational research.


Push Against Gun Violence Gets $500,000 in Federal Help

$50,000 will go to Harborview’s Injury Prevention & Research Center to partially fund research into gun violence prevention.

Dr. Monica Vavilala, Director of the Injury Prevention and Research Center at Harborview, said “Past research shows that survivors of shootings are 20 times more likely to be shot again… The question for researchers is how to prevent the survivors from ending up back at the hospital... We are trying to figure out an effective strategy to decrease the morbidity that these patients have and to improve their quality and quantity of life...”

“The research will involve a randomized controlled trial in which half the hospital’s adult survivors of gun violence will receive the usual medical care and social-work engagement, she said. The other half will receive enhanced care over six months that could address employment, housing, mental-health issues and more…” “We’re very grateful for the opportunity to launch what we think is a really important initiative which is how best to prevent future gun crimes and future injuries from gun violence.”

For more on this story, go to: http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/crime/push-against-gun-violence-gets-500000-in-federal-help/




Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Mark Opp

Congratulations, Dr. Opp!

Mark Opp, PhD Dr. Mark Opp has been appointed the Founding Editor-in-Chief of Neurobiology of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms. The journal is published by Elsevier, and was officially launched at the Society for Neuroscience meeting in October.




Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Karen Domino

Congratulations, Dr. Domino!

Karen B. Domino, MD, MPH — Congratulations to Dr. Karen Domino on completion of her role as chair of the ASA annual meeting program this year.




Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Karen Souter

Congratulations, Dr. Souter!

Karen J. Souter, MBBS, FRCA, MACM was elected President of AACPD – Association of Anesthesiology Core Program Directors for a two year term: 2015 – 2017.
Representing Program Directors of all 131 anesthesiology residency programs in the U.S.A.





April – June 2015


Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Stephan Thilen

Congratulations, Dr. Thilen!

Stephan Thilen, MD, MS Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, UW Medical Center, received a grant award in the amount of $39,835 from the UW Royalty Research Fund in support of his ongoing study on: *"Outcomes Associated with Preoperative Medical Consultation in Medicare Patients."




Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Mark Opp

Congratulations, Dr. Opp!

Mark R. Opp, PhD, Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, Harborview Medical Center, received a grant award in the amount of $424,875 from NIH National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, for the project period: 05/01/2015—04/30/2017, in support of his study on "Astrocytes, Sleep and Neuroinflammation." This project uses novel transgenic mice and pharmacogenetic tools to test hypotheses that astrocytes play a critical role in the inflammatory responses to sleep loss.


Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Rong Tian

Congratulations, Dr. Tian!

Rong Tian, MD, PhD, Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, South Lake Union, received $2.7 million (total cost over 4 years) from the NHLBI to test novel strategies for targeting fatty acid oxidation in hearts with pathological hypertrophy. She has also received $3.1 million (total cost over 4 years) from the NHLBI to study glucose and amino acid metabolism in cardiac stress responses. The NHLBI and Office of Dietary Supplement has awarded her $478,000 (total cost over 2 years) to perform the first in human safety and tolerability study of nicotinamide riboside in heart failure. Amgen has recently awarded her $87,000 (total cost for 1 year) to study cardiac metabolism in heart failure with preserved systolic function.


Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Bala Nair
Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Monica Vavilala

Congratulations, Drs. Nair & Vavilala!

Bala Nair, MD, Research Associate Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, UW Medical Center, and Monica Vavilala, MD, Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, Harborview Medical Center, received a grant award in the amount of $130,234 from the Coulter Foundation for the project period: June 1, 2015—May 31, 2016, in support of their study on "Evaluation of Smart Anesthesia Manager" (SAM) Integrated with Multiple Anesthesia Information Systems to Deliver Real-time Decision Support and Guidance Funding Source."






Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Anthony M. Roche

Congratulations, Dr. Roche!

Anthony M. Roche, MB ChB, Associate Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, Harborview Medical Center, received (in conjunction with Dr. Wendy Thomas) a grant award in the amount of $30,000 from Global WACh—W.H. Coulter Foundation Seed Grants, in support of their study on "Novel, Affordable Anesthetic Delivery Device that Leverages Inexpensive Phase Change Materials (PCMs) to Control Device Temperatures.". (Dr. Thomas is UW Associate Professor & Vice Chair, Academic Affairs, in the Department of Bioengineering.)


Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Daniel Rubens

Congratulations, Dr. Rubens!

Daniel Rubens, MD BS, FAZSCA, Associate Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine: "Daniel Rubens is onto something. Rubens has spent the last 11 years doing research...working on a hypothesis that SIDS could be related to an undetected, inner ear dysfunction that makes it difficult for a baby to automatically rouse and reposition itselfwhen it is having trouble breathing. They don't have the trigger that tells them to move and access fresh air, so they just stop breathing. They suffocate." —Broeder, Nicole "One Seattle Children's doctor thinks he's close to stopping SIDS." Seattle Times 3 April 2015. (For more on this story, visit the Seattle Times article online here.)


Faculty Awards Photo
Sam Sharar, MD

Congratulations, Dr. Sharar!

Sam Sharar, MD, Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, was featured in the UW Health Sciences NewsBeat (issue 05/28/15) in the article: "Virtual-reality games reduce pain. Now to answer why." From the article:

"For more than 15 years, burn patients at HMC have donned a head-mounted display to play a virtual-realtiy game while undergoing painful dressing changes and other therapies...

"If we can tease out the biological basis of how virtual reality reduces the perception of pain, we should be able to make the treatment more effective," said Dr. Sam Sharar, a UW professor of anesthesiology and pain medicine...

Sharar and colleagues Hunter Hoffman, David Patterson and Todd Richards have been conducting a series of experiments by using functional magnetic resonance imaging to observe the brains of courageous voluneers as they play the game while submitting to a painful events...

Hoffman, a research scientist in the Human Photonics Lab, and Patterson, a UW professor of psychology, developed the original SnowWorld system in the 1990s. Richards is a professor of radiology and an expert in functional brain imaging. Sharar has a special interest in non-pharmacological methods of pain management.

Read more on this story online here.



January – March 2015

Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Deepak Sharma

Congratulations, Dr. Sharma!

Deepak Sharma, MBBS, MD, DM Professor & Division Chief Neuroanesthesia & Perioperative Neuroscience, is being awarded Virginia and Prentice Bloedel Endowed Professorship effective July 1st, 2015.

This endowed professorship is awarded to outstanding faculty who have demonstrated, through leadership in professional activities and research, expertise in their respective discipline.


Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Burkhard Mackensen

Congratulations, Dr. Mackensen!

Burkhard Mackensen, MD, PhD, FASE Professor & Chief, CT Anesthesia, was elected as a member-at-large to the Council on Perioperative Echocardiography (COPE) board of the American Society of Echocardiography for 2015. All terms are for two years, and may be renewed once for these positions. He will assume the position in June at the ASE Scientific Sessions in Boston.

COPE is an important liaison body within the ASE as it provides a forum for cardiologists and cardiothoracic anesthesiologists to connect and collaborate (e.g., ASE guidelines development, special perioperative echocardiography projects, etc.).


Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Monica Vavilala, MD

Congratulations, Dr. Vavilala!

Monica Vavilala, MD Professor of Anesthesiology and Pediatrics; Director, Harborview Injury Prevention & Research Center (HIPRC),received a grant award in the amount of $75,000 from Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, for the period: January 2015 through June 2015, in support of her study on "Traumatic Brain Injury School Transitions and Educator needs."


Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Ardith Z. Doorenbos
Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Brian Theodore

Congratulations, Drs. Doorenbos & Theodore!

Ardith Z. Doorenbos, PhD, RN, Professor, Biobehavioral Nursing & Health Systems, UWMC & Brian Theodore, PhD, Research Assistant Professor, (Division of Pain Medicine Associate Investigators/co-PIs) have received a grant award in the amount of $1.0 million over 2 years (sub-contract with the Department of Defense Intramural Award from Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program [Funding @W81XWH-14-DMRDP-CRI-IRA-MTI]).

This funding will support their study on "Enhancing the Success of Functional Restoration using Integrative Pain Therapies: a Comparative Effectiveness Analysis in Active Duty Service Members with Chronic Pain."

Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Wang Wang

 



Congratulations, Dr. Wang!

Wang Wang, MD, PhD UW Medicine Assistant Professor, Wang Lab, MMC, SLU, has received a 2-year grant in the ammount of $100,000 from the American Diabetes Association in support of his study entitled: "Source and sites of action of hydrogen peroxide in mitochondria and cytosol of pancreatic islets." The goal of this Project is to develop a novel methodology for the real time evaluation of compartmentalized hydrogen peroxide (H202) in pancreatic islets.


Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Ben-Ari

Congratulations, Dr. Ben-Ari!

Alon Ben-Ari, MD Assistant Professor, VAPSHCS, Dr. Alon Ben-Ari's paper titled "Text Mining the EMR for Modeling and Predicting Suicidal Behavior among U.S. Veterans of the 1991 Persian Gulf War" has won the best paper in the Healthcare track at the 48th Annual HICSS (Hawaiian INternational Conference on System Sciences) held January 5-8, 2015.

HICSS is one of the longest-standing continuously running scientific conferences. Technically co-sponsored by the IEEE Computer Society, this conference brings together researchers from over 40 countries.

Faculty Awards Photo
Dr. Vijay Krishnamoorthy

Congratulations, Dr. Krishnamoorthy!

Vijay Krishnamoorthy, MD Assistant Professor & T-32 Research Fellow, Dr. Vijay Krishnamoorthy's study was quoted in HSNewsBeat online article: Some Rejected Donor Hearts are Transplant Viable. *....Despite a dire shortage of organ donors, transplant teams turn down about one in four hearts from brain-dead donors because their hearts appear to pump poorly.

"This study suggets," said study co-author Dr. Vijay Krishnamoorthy, UW Acting Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, "that we shouldn't decide whether to use a heart on the basis of just one early evaluation, .... If the initial echocardiogram detects heart dysfunction, we should maintain these patients with optimal supportive care and check again in one or two days. In many cases, the heart will have recovered and be suitable for transplantation."

For more on the story, see the article here.

* This study was conducted at Harborview Injury Prevention & Research Center.

 


September – December 2014

Faculty Photo
Dr. Piotr Michalaowski

Congratulations, Dr. Michalowski!

Piotr Michalowski, MD, PhD UW Medicine Clinical Professor, was selected by the search committee as Permanent Chief of the Anesthesiology Service at VA Puget Sound Health Care System, effective December 4th.



Faculty Photo
Dr. Carlos Delgado-Upegui

Congratulations, Carlos!

Carlos Delgado-Upegui, MD, Acting Instructor/Obstetric Anesthesia Senior Fellow, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine has been selected into the Inaugural Class for UW Certificate Program in Patient Safety and Quality. This first class of seventeen highly qualified individuals comes from a wide variety of specialties and administrative positions, including internal medicine, surgical specialties, pediatrics, anesthesiology, psychiatry, emergency medicine, critical care, quality improvement, and the Center for Clinical Excellence. Participants range from residents to Associate Professors and bring a rich perspective and history to the program.



July – August 2014

Photo of Kushang Patel, PhD, MPH
Dr. Kushang V. Patel

Congratulations, Dr. Patel!

Kushang Patel, PhD, MPH, Research Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine received Fellow status by the Gerontological Society of America (GSA) in support of his outstanding and continuing work in the field of gerontology.




Photo of Nathalia Jimenez, MD, MPH (PI)
Dr. Nathalia Jimenez

Congratulations, Dr. Jimenez!

Nathalia Jimenez, MD, MPH (PI), Assistant Professor, Seattle Children's Hospital received the NIH K-23 award in support of her 5 year study: Disparities in Disability after Traumatic Brain Injury for Hispanic Children. The project period is from July 1, 2014 - June 30, 2019.


Photo of Mike Souter, MB ChB, FRCA
Dr. Mike Souter

Congratulations, Dr. Souter!

Mike Souter, MB ChB, FRCA, Professor, Harborview Medical Center, has been awarded Fellowship status by the Neurocritical Care Society (FCNS), on the basis of contributions to the field of neurocritical care in the areas of program development, scholarly activity, and leadership.

We congratulate Dr. Souter on this appointment as an acknowledgement of his outstanding and continuing work in the field of neurocritical care.
Photo of Vanessa Loland, MD, PhD
Dr. Vanessa Loland

Congratulations, Dr. Loland!

Vanessa Loland, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, UW Medical Center, has been named as the new Chair of the department of Clinical Competency Committee. We thank Dr. Loland for agreeing to take on the immense responsibility of this office.

We also acknowledge and thank Dr. Anne Lynn for having filled this office for the past two years.


Photo of Jennifer Rabbitts, MB, ChB
Dr. Jennifer Rabbitts

Congratulations, Dr. Rabbitts!

Jennifer Rabbitts, MB, ChB, Assistant Professor, Seattle Children's Hospital was awarded an NIH K-32 Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & HUman Development Award in the amount of $636,865 to support her study on "Pain and Health Related Quality of Life in Children after Surgery." Project Period: 8/25/2014--06/30/2019.


Photo of Wang Wang, MD, PhD
Dr. Wang Wang

Congratulations, Dr. Wang!

Wang Wang, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, UW Medical Center, MMC, SLU, received an award from the Diabetes Research Center (DRC) in the amount of $36,000 per year for two years (7/01/2014--6/30/2016) to support his Pilot and Feasibility project entitled "Mechanistic Coupling between Obesity and Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy."



June 2014

Photo of Christopher
Dr. Christopher Ciliberto

Congratulations, Dr. Christopher Ciliberto!

Christopher "Cili" Ciliberto, MD, Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine has been appointed Interim Director of OB Anesthesia.





Photo of Monica Vavilala, MD
Monica Vavilala, MD

Congratulations Dr. Vavilala!

Monica Vavilala, MD, UW Medicine Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, Harborview Medical Center, was invited to serve as a member of the Surgery, Anesthesia and Trauma Study Section, National Institutes of Health Center for Scientific Review for the term beginning July 01, 2014 and ending June 30, 2020.




Photo of David Tauben, MD
Dr. David Tauben

Congratulations, Dr. Tauben!

Dr. David Tauben, Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine has been appointed Chief of the Division of Pain Medicine.




Photo of Stephen Kolwicz, PhD
Dr. Stephen C. Kolwicz

Congratulations, Dr. Stephen Kolwicz, Jr.!

Stephen C. Kolwicz, Jr., PhD, UW Medicine Acting Instructor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine received The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Foundation award in support of his one year pilot study: The Effect of Enhanced Fatty Acid Oxidation on Exercise Capacity and Performance. Results of the study will provide insight into the efficacy of the potential use of acetyl CoA carboxylase2 (ACC2) inhibitors in the treatment of diabestes and obsesity.


Photo of Judith A. Turner, PhD
Dr. Judith A. Turner

Congratulations, Dr.Judith Turner!

Judith A. Turner, PhD, UW Medicine Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and Clinical Faculty, Division of Pain Medicine at Center fo Pain Relief, Roosevelt, has been elected next President of The International Association of the Study of Pain—the most prestigious pain society in the world. Dr. Turner is the third UW Pain faculty member to have been elected to this office.


Tonya M. Palermo, PhD
Tonya M. Palermo, PhD

Congratulations, Dr. Tonya Palermo!

Tonya M. Palermo, PhD, Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, received notice of Grant Award for her K24 competitive renewal application to fund an additional 5 years on her study: Innovations in Pediatric Pain Research.




May 2014

Photo of Nicholas Kassebaum, MD
Dr. Nicholas Kassebaum

Congratulations, Dr. Nicholas Kassebaum!

Nicholas Kassebaum, MD, Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, had his paper Global, regional, and national levels and causes of maternal mortality during 1990—2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 published in The Lancet, May 2, 2014 (early online publication).
Read the complete article>



April 2014

Photo of Kai Togashi, MD
Dr. Kai Togashi

Congratulations, Dr. Kai Togashi!

Kai Togashi, MD, Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, was awarded the Roizen Anesthesia Research Foundation New Investigator Grant for his project: "Randomzied Study of the Clinical Impact of Surgical Correction of Tricuspid Insufficiency in Implantable LVAD Patients." The project period is from July 1, 2014 - June 30, 2016.


Photo of Michele Curatolo, MD PhD
Dr. Michele Curatolo

Congratulations, Dr. Michele Curatolo!

Michele Curatolo, MD, PhD, Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, has had the degree of Doctor Medicinae Honoris Causa for his distinguished efforts in the field of medical research conferred on him by the Aalborg University of Denmark.


Photo of Stephen C. Kolwicz, Jr., PhD
Dr. Stephen C. Kolwicz, Jr.

Congratulations, Dr. Stephen Kolwicz, Jr.!

Stephen C. Kolwicz, Jr., PhD, Acting Instructor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, has had awarded an American College of Sports Medicine Foundation research endowment grant for a one year pilot study: The Effect of Enhanced Fatty Acid Oxidation on Exercise Capacity and Performance.


March 2014

Photo of G. Berkhard Mackensen, MD, PhD
Dr. G. Burkhard Mackensen

Congratulations, Dr. Burkhard Mackensen!

G. Burkhard Mackensen, MD, PhD, FASE, Professor & Division Chief, CT Anesthesia, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, by vote of the general membership of the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists (SCA), was elected to the Board of Directors of SCA for a 3-year term. He was also invited to serve on the scientific program committee for the 2015 & 2016 meetings.


Photo of Mark Opp, MD
Dr. Mark Opp

Congratulations, Dr. Mark Opp!

Mark Opp, MD, Professor & Vice Chair for Basic Research, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, was able to purchase a Li-Cor Odyssey CLx Infrared Imaging System that can be used for Western blots, ELISA, Protein Arrays, and more with a Seattle Medical Foundation Shared Instrumentation grant of $55,000.


Photo of Margaret M. Sedensky, MD
Dr. Margaret M. Sedensky
Philip G. Morgan, MD
Dr. Philip G. Morgan
<

Congratulations, Drs. Sedensky & Morgan!

Margaret M. Sedensky, MD (co-PI) and Philip G. Moran, MD (co-PI), Professors in the Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, for their award of a 1 RO1 GM 105696 Grant in support of their study: A Mouse Model Linking Anesthetic Sensitivity to Mitochondrial Function. The award is for 4 years for a total of $2.22 million.





February 2014

Photo of Mark Sullivan, MD, PhD
Dr. Mark Sullivan
Photo of David Tauben, MD
Dr. David Tauben

Congratulations, UW TelePain!

Mark Sullivan, MD, PhD, (PI) Dept. of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, and faculty at UW Medicine Center for Pain Relief, and David Tauben, MD, (Co- Investigator) Pain Medicine Division Chief and UW Tele-Pain Medical Director, received a COPE (Collaborative Opioid Prescribing Education) Award designated for UW TelePain, a program that provides case consultation about chronic pain.











Photo of Andy Bowdle, MD, PhD
Dr. Andy Bowdle

Congratulations, Dr. Andy Bowdle!

T. Andrew Bowdle MD, PhD, Professor & Director of Cardiothoracic Anesthesiology Simulation, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine has been awarded an ASPF grant for his project: "Study of the Implementation and Performance of the APSF Pre-anesthetic Induction Patient Safety (PIPS) Checklist."


Tonya M. Palermo, PhD
Dr. Tonya M. Palermo
Photo of Margaret M. Sedensky, MD
Dr. Margaret M. Sedensky

Congratulations, Drs. Palermo & Sedensky!

Tonya M. Palermo, PhD, Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, and Margaret M. Sedensky, MD, Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine for getting their T32 Anesthesiology & Perioperative Training Grant renewed.


January 2014

Photo of Mark Opp, MD
Dr. Mark Opp

Congratulations, Dr. Mark Opp!

Mark Opp, MD, Professor & Vice Chair for Basic Research, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine; UW Medicine Research & Education Endowed Chair in Anesthesiology, has been appointed to the organizing committee for TransNIH Sleep / Pain Workshop, National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine.


Photo of David Dorsey
Dr. David Dorsey

Congratulations, Dr. David Dorsey!

David Dorsey, MD, was selected as the new Academic Chief Resident for 2014-2015.

Photo of Brian Hawkins
Dr. Brian J. Hawkins




Congratulations, Dr. Brian Hawkins!

Brian J. Hawkins, PhD, UW Medicine Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine & Adjunct Assistant Professor, Pathology, received a Bridge Funding Grant from the UW Office of Research for his research, "Mitochondria-to-nucleus Communication via the Permeability Transition Pore."


Photo of Stephan Thilen
Dr. Stephan Thilen

Congratulations, Dr. Stephan Thilen!

Stephan Thilen, MD, MS, UW Medicine Assistant Professor, Dept. of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, UWMC, had his JAMA article, "Preoperative Consultations for Medicare Patients Undergoing Cataract Surgery," featured in the Seattle Times on January 3, 2014.


January 2014

Photo of Greg Terman
Dr. Greg Terman

Congratulations, Dr. Greg Terman!

Greg Terman, MD, PhD, UW Medicine Professor, Dept. of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, UWMC, has assumed the role of Interim Chief of the Acute Pain Service, as of January 10th, 2014.


November 2013

Photo of Monica Vavilala, MD
Dr. Monica Vavilala

Congratulations Dr. Vavilala!

Monica Vavilala, MD, UW Medicine Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, Harborview Medical Center, was invited to serve on the UW School of Medicine's Appointments and Promotion Council for a 3-year term.

In addition, Dr. Vavilala was awarded a UO1 grant for her project, "Multiple Medical Therapies for Pediatric TBI: Comparative Effectiveness Approach (ADAPT)." The project runs from 7/1/13 to 6/30/18, and is sponsored by University of Pittsburgh/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.


October 2013

Photo of award ceremony
Left to right: Carol Jones, Director of Ambulatory Care, Jennifer Herrman, Associate Administrator of Ambulatory Care , Angela Roof, Dr. Irakli Soulakvelidze, Dr. David Tauben, Medical Director of the UW Center for Pain Relief, and Patricia Ashley, Senior Clinic Nurse Manager of the Center for Pain Relief

Congratulations Dr. Irakli Soulakvelidze & Angela Roof, PA!

Dr. Irakli Soulakvelidze & Angela Roof, PA, with the UWMC Center for Pain Relief, are one of UWMC's Fall 2013 UW Medicine Cares Award team recipients! Dr. Soulakvelidze is a Clinical Assistant Professor and Program Director, Pain Fellowship Program, Dept. Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine.

The UW Medicine Cares Award is based on UW Medicine's Service Culture Guidelines, which are: respect privacy and confidentiality; communicate effectively; conduct myself professionally; be accountable; be committed to my colleagues and to UW Medicine.


August 2013

Seattle Met Magazine "Top Doctors 2013"

The following Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine doctors were chosen tops in their field for 2013 by "Seattle Met Magazine".

Over 1,100 doctors, nurses, and physician's assistants in the Seattle metropolitan area participated in Seattle Met's 2013 survey. They were asked: If you or a loved one needed medical care, whom would you choose? An anonymous advisory panel of administrators, doctors, and nurses from local hospitals, clinics, and practices vetted the list and shared their expertise, further authenticating the results. The final list of 722 top practitioners represents roughly the top 10 percent of nominations in each specialty. As of press time, all the top-ranked doctors and nurse practitioners were certified to practice in their fields by the Washington State Department of Health.


Seattle Magazine "Top Doctors 2013"

The 414 best physicians in the Puget Sound region, as chosen by their peers, include the following Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine doctor:

Thousands of local doctors were asked this question: To whom would you send a loved one for medical care? More than 4,500 doctors submitted nearly 15,000 nominations in a peer-to-peer survey process. These are the doctors to whom other doctors turn when they or their families need care.

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