Applied Ecology Lab

Science supporting conservation & management


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MISSION


Using our knowledge and skills to help solve real-world problems.




VISION


Our vision is to better understand and manage aquatic ecosystems through the integration of data, analysis, and communication.




VALUES


We are dedicated to providing a welcoming and supportive environment for all people, regardless of their background, identity, appearance, or manner of communication. Our team works in an open science environment, relying on trust and respect to build effective partnerships. We continually strive to improve and expand upon our complimentary skillsets through education and innovation, and we believe strongly in the sharing of knowledge through conversation and writing.




LAND ACKNOWLEDGMENT


We acknowledge the ancestral homelands of those who walked here before us and those who still walk here, keeping in mind the integrity of this territory where area Native peoples identify as the Duwamish, Suquamish, Snoqualmie, and Puyallup, as well as the tribes of the Muckleshoot, Tulalip, other Coast Salish peoples, and their descendants. We are grateful to respectfully live and work as guests on these lands with the Coast Salish and Native people who call this home.

OUR TEAM


Mark Scheuerell

Mark Scheuerell

Principal Investigator

Mark’s research interests lie at the intersection of ecology and management. He is broadly interested in the roles of natural and anthropogenic drivers on freshwater and coastal ecosystems, and the services we derive from them. You can find out more about Mark’s research and teaching interests here. Mark also appreciates a healthy work-life balance. In his free time, Mark enjoys cycling, skiing, and spending time with his family.

Dara Farrell

Dara Farrell

Post-doc

Dara obtained her Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Washington in Seattle in the summer of 2019 where the focus of her research was underwater acoustics – specifically anthropogenic and background noise characterization. Dara began her university career with a Bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of the West Indies in Trinidad & Tobago, and went on to complete her Masters degree in Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign on a Fulbright-LASPAU scholarship. She strives toward a multi-disciplinary approach to measuring, understanding and solving environmental problems, and uses machine learning, GIS and passive acoustics in her work. She finds great satisfaction in being involved in multi-disciplinary projects which allow her to hone her engineering- and acoustics-related skills.

Kelly Mistry

Kelly Mistry

MS Student

Kelly is a student in the Quantitative Ecology and Resource Management (QERM) program. Her work in the Applied Ecology lab focuses on improving spatiotemporal models used with groundfish stocks in the Gulf of Alaska in partnership with colleagues at NOAA Fisheries. Kelly comes to science from a previous career in nonprofit administration, fundraising and science communication, having earned a BA in cultural history and religion in 2011. Originally from Alaska, she has lived in Seattle for over 9 years. Kelly spends most of her free time working on improving (fixing) the boat that she lives on with her husband and two pets. Kelly is always happy to talk with anyone considering graduate school coming from a non-traditional or first-gen background, and she is committed to increasing inclusion and equity in STEM fields and academic institutions. Find out more about Kelly here.

Markus Min

Markus Min

MS Student

Markus’s academic and research interests are primarily focused on the application of ecological and statistical models to the management of marine ecosystems and fisheries. Prior to coming to SAFS, he completed his BS in Marine Biology at UCLA and worked as a research assistant in the Biological Oceanography Group at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). While his research at both UCLA and MBARI was focused on the new, exciting field of environmental DNA (eDNA), it was his time spent studying groundfish as an intern at NOAA Fisheries that inspired him to return to Seattle to study fisheries science and marine ecology at SAFS. In addition to his academic interests, Markus enjoys playing music, baking, fishing, hiking, and watching hockey (he also hopes to one day play, but he needs to learn how to skate first). Find out more about Markus here.

Karl Veggerby

Karl Veggerby

MS Student

Before joining SAFS, Karl worked at NOAA Fisheries on a wide variety of research projects ranging from shellfish farms in Puget Sound, to the lower Columbia River, to high altitude salmon spawning grounds in the Salmon River Basin, Idaho. In particular, his work has focused on using stable isotopes to better understand food web dynamics, analyzing otoliths to estimate past somatic growth of juvenile fish, and more recently, examining the habitat function of Puget Sound shellfish farms using underwater video. Karl obtained a BS in environmental sciences from Western Washington University in 2014. In his free time Karl makes and sells fine furniture with his father in their woodshop, enjoys skiing and other outdoor activities, drinks and brews beer with his friends, and goes on walks to say hello to the cats in his neighborhood.

Nicole Doran

Nicole Doran

MS Student

Nicole is a 2019 Udall Scholar and recent graduate from The Ohio State University where she obtained a BS in Biology, and minored in American Indian Studies. During undergrad, Nicole developed an interest in applied ecology, conservation, and resource management. Prior to coming to SAFS Nicole spent a year working at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital’s COVID-19 PCR testing laboratory, but she is excited to be returning to school at UW for graduate study. Nicole is excited to explore new research interests in the field of fisheries science, as well as exploring the Pacific Northwest! In her free time, she enjoys cooking, painting, spending time outdoors, and playing Assassin’s Creed. At UW Nicole is looking forward to continuing her involvement in SACNAS, mentoring students, and advocating for greater inclusion and efforts to uphold tribal sovereignty in STEM.

Andrea Hennings

Andrea Hennings

MS Student

Andrea is a biologist with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) Marine Fish Science Unit where she is the Unit’s remotely operated vehicle (ROV) program data manager, video annotation supervisor, and field coordinator, as well as an ROV pilot. In this position, her work supports long-term monitoring and population assessments of Salish Sea groundfish, principally rockfish and lingcod, in untrawlable habitats. Prior to WDFW, Andrea was support staff to the Snohomish County Marine Resources Committee (MRC) where she contributed to a range of projects, including the development of a derelict crabbing gear education and outreach program and the regional citizen science expansion of the NOAA Mussel Watch water quality program. When she’s not looking at fish on a computer, Andrea enjoys growing her own food, skiing, and sailing with her husband and rescue dog.

Pat Chris

Pat Chris

Future lab member

Pat is a great team player and a pleasure to be around. Pat has been known to make a mistake on occasion, but they also understand that we can always learn from them as well. Outside of academia, Pat enjoys competitive dog grooming, mountain unicycling, and gardening.

Ashes Kittyball

Ashes Kittyball

Sleepy Cat

Ashes loves to avoid people and sleep while doing it. During the few hours a day she is awake, Ashes can sometimes be heard asking to be fed.

OUR RESEARCH


Research in the Applied Ecology Lab focuses on the conservation and management of aquatic resources, particularly within Washington State and along the west coast of North America. Much of our research is focused on the development and application of statistical methods for analyzing temporal and spatial data, but we collect our own data as well. Please see below for some examples of recent projects in our lab. In particular, our research relies on a combination of empirical data, quantitative analysis, and communication. We also pursue our scientific endeavors in an open science environment where we create accessible and reproducible workflows.

Empirical data

Hands-on field and lab studies.

Quantitative analysis

Finding signals among the noise in data.

Communication

Sharing our information and listening to others.

Open science

Creating accessible and reproducible workflows.

Contact info


School of Aquatic and Fishery SciencesUniversity of WashingtonPO Box 355020Seattle, WA 98195-5020