Updates to our Collision Cross Section Database

The Bush Lab Collision Cross Section database continues to be an important resource for the ion mobility community. Our database is accessed ~5,000 times per year by researchers from around the world (~70% North America, ~25% Europe, ~5% Asia). Recent updates to our group website had made it more challenging to interact with our data, which has now prompted us to make our data more accessible and provide access to even more of the collision cross sections measured by the Bush Lab.

We hope that these changes make this data more accessible and useful for the ion mobility spectrometry community. It you have any feedback or suggestions, please feel free to email Matt Bush.

New NIH Award!

The Bush Lab was just awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health for a project titled “Increasing the Selectivity of Hybrid Mass Spectrometry Using Multidimensional Ion Mobility Spectrometry” (R01 GM130708). We are excited to pursue this research and are grateful for this financial support from the NIH.

Matt Bush appointed as an Affiliate of the UW eScience Institute

The Bush Lab is excited to join the eScience Institute, which empowers researchers and students in all fields to answer fundamental questions through the use of large, complex, and noisy data. As the hub of data-intensive discovery on campus, the eScience Institute leads a community of innovators in the techniques, technologies, and best practices of data science and the fields that depend on them.

Snow in Seattle!

Snow is rare in Seattle, which makes us appreciate it more than people in most places. Here are some pictures from near our lab.

Out of the Attic, Into the Lab: building a shrink ray is harder than it looks

On August 1st, Rae Eaton, a graduate student in the Bush Lab, presented a talk entitled “Out of the Attic, Into the Lab: building a shrink ray is harder than it looks” The talk was part of the Science and a Movie program, a series put on by Central Cinema and the Pacific Science Center. The series pairs talks from scientists in the Seattle area with silly or classic movies.

In the talk, Rae used stories from the world of bioanalytical chemistry to discuss the challenges home inventors can run into working in unusual spaces, and explores the benefits a lab offers versus working by oneself in their garage. The talk was followed by a screening of “Honey I Shrunk the Kids”.

Thanks to Central Cinema and the Pacific Science Center’s Meet a Scientist program for the opportunity!

New NSF Award!

The Bush Lab was just awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation for a project titled “Bridging the Gap Between Observables from Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry and the Structures of Native Proteins” (1807382). We are excited to pursue this research and are grateful for this financial support from the NSF.