GAMIFICATION+GAMER

Phillip Toledano's Gamers

Keywords for Video Game Studies Colloquium
May 21, 2011
9-3 PM
Communication 202
University of Washington, Seattle
Visitors Information

*Please be advised that the University District Street Fair is May 21 & 22. Travel to and around the University Way area (from Campus Parkway to 50th) will be more challenging. Expect delays.*

____________________________________________________________

The Keywords for Video Game Studies colloquium invites game scholars, artists, designers, developers, and enthusiasts to participate in roundtable discussions, presentations of individual and collaborative work, scholarship, and play.  The colloquium, broadly themed by the keyword “gamer,” is the capstone event to a year-long series of workshop sessions on play, immersion/interactivity, avatar, power/control, and pedagogy.  The colloquium hopes to foster the growing engagement with what it means to study or make or play digital games.

The Keywords for Video Game Studies working group, in collaboration with the Critical Gaming Project at the University of Washington and the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory (HASTAC), is supported by the Simpson Center for the Humanities.  For more information about the Keywords group, go to: https://depts.washington.edu/critgame/wordpress/keywords/

The colloquium is free and open to University of Washington students, faculty, staff, and community.

9:00 AM-10:00 AM Registration & Welcome

10:00 AM-12:00 PM Session I: “Gamification”

12:00 PM-1:00 PM Lunch/Break

1:00-3:00 PM Session II: “Gamer”

Full “Gamification+Gamer” Program PDF

News, Notes, and Commentary

THATCamp Epic Play 2013, May 24-25, UW, Simpson Center

January 5th, 2013

THATCamp Epic Play is an unconference and year-end colloquium hosted by the Keywords for Video Game Studies graduate interest group.  THATCamp Epic Play invites digital humanists, game scholars, teachers, artists, librarians, students, designers, developers, and enthusiasts to participate in roundtable discussions; lightning presentations of individual and collaborative work; research, scholarship, and pedagogy on games of all sorts; and of course, play.  Building on previous years’ colloquia, this year’s THATCamp, broadly themed by the keyword “EPIC,” is the capstone event to a year-long series of workshop sessions on violence, history, fantasy, bodies/sex, and close/distant.  THATCamp Epic Play hopes to foster the growing engagement with what it means to study or make or play games.

THATCamp Epic Play will be hosted by the Simpson Center for the Humanities at University of Washington in Seattle on May 24 & 25, 2013.

For more information, if you’d like to help plan THATCamp Epic Play, or if you would like to lead a workshop, contact thatcampepicplay(at)gmail(doc)com.

Registration is now open from January 1, 2013 to January 31, 2013 or when all spots are full.  Before you register for THATCamp Epic Play 2013, please note:

  • The date and location of the event: University of Washington at Seattle on Friday, May 24 and Saturday, May 25.
  • We can accommodate no more than 70 people. We encourage you to register as soon as possible, but please do not register unless you know for sure that you are able to participate.
  • To attend, you need to complete and submit a brief registration application.  Once you’re accepted, you will receive a message confirming your registration.  If you decide that you can no longer attend, please let us know so we may give the seat to another participant.
  • We will email all participants in April, just prior to THATCamp Epic Play on May 24-25, 2013.
  • To keep up with THATCamp Epic Play news, you might want to follow @critgame and the #thatcamp hashtag on Twitter.

To register, please email thatcampepicplay@gmail.com, with subject line “REGISTRATION <Your Name>,” the following information and material:

  • Name:
  • E-mail:
  • Website:
  • Twitter handle:
  • Job title/Position:
  • Organization:
  • Bio (less than 300 words):

Please answer each in just a few sentences (no more than a paragraph):

  • Why do you want to attend THATCamp Epic Play?
  • Are there any specific games, game experiences, or aspects of gaming that you want to discuss?
  • Have you attended a THATCamp before and how can we make THATCamp both accessible and worth your time?

Please also indicate your privacy preference:

  • ___ I agree that the information provided may be published to the open web on the THATCamp Epic Play website.
  • ___ I would like my information to remain private.

2012 Keywords “RESEARCH/DESIGN” Colloquium, Saturday, May 19, 8 AM-4 PM, Communication 202

May 1st, 2012

 

For more information and full program, go to: https://depts.washington.edu/critgame/wordpress/research-design-colloquium/

CFP: “RESEARCH/DESIGN” Keywords Colloquium Deadline Extended to April 13!

April 7th, 2012

CALL FOR PARTICIPANTS
RESEARCH/DESIGN
Keywords for Video Game Studies Colloquium
Saturday, May 19, 2012
8 AM to 3 PM
Communication 202
University of Washington, Seattle

The Keywords for Video Game Studies graduate interest group (GIG) at the University of Washington invites game scholars, artists, designers, developers, and enthusiasts to participate in our one-day colloquium on critical gaming.  The colloquium, broadly themed by the keywords “research/design,” is the capstone event to our year-long series of workshop sessions on “democracy,” “time,” “altplay/fandom,” “gold farming,” and “hack/customization” and hopes to provide a space for individuals and groups to present their work, to discuss and collaborate on what it means to study or make digital games, to network, and to play games.

In the introduction to How to Do Things with Videogames, Ian Bogost argues for “the many uses of videogames, and how together they make the medium broader, richer, and more relevant” (7).  He continues, “I take for granted that understanding games as a medium of leisure or productivity is insufficient.  Instead, I suggest we imagine the videogame as a medium with valid uses across the spectrum, from art to tools and everything in between” (7).  The Keywords colloquium takes up this call to imagine the power, potential, and practices of videogames as objects of study, design, critique, and fun.

Our colloquium then invites “lightning” presentations, demonstrations, or performances that engage (suggested but not limited to):

Video games and research                            Video games and play/work
Video games and academia                           Video games and teaching
Video game code, design, development       Video games industry/marketing
Video games and activism/politics               Video games and art/poetics/performance
Video games and fandom/community         Video games and other media
Video games and war                                     Video games and storytelling

Send a brief abstract or rationale (500 words or less) for your presentation to critgame@uw.edu by 5 PM on Friday, April 13, 2012 *deadline extended*.  Colloquium sessions will be roundtable, discussion format organized around short programs (6-8 “lightning” talk presenters) or long programs (1-3 presenters or extended performance or demonstration).  Short program presentations should be less than 5 minutes to allow for question and answer and conversation.  These should not be conference paper style presentations, but rather provide introductions, provocations, or focused interventions into your work, your project, or your idea.  Long program presentations can be more fully developed game play walk-throughs, performances, or interactive demonstrations.  Please include along with your abstract the names, emails, titles, affiliations or institutions of presenters, and your A/V requirements.

Participants will be notified of their acceptance by email by April 20, 2012.  Participants, if accepted, will need to arrange for travel, transportation, lodging, and equipment on their own.  Unfortunately, the Keywords group is unable to provide any funding for expenses.

The Keywords for Video Game Studies working group, in collaboration with the Critical Gaming Project at the University of Washington and the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory (HASTAC), is supported by the Simpson Center for the Humanities.

Download the RESEARCH/DESIGN Keywords Colloquium CFP.

CFP: Keywords “RESEARCH/DESIGN” Colloquium, May 19, University of Washington

January 26th, 2012

CALL FOR PARTICIPANTS
RESEARCH/DESIGN
Keywords for Video Game Studies Colloquium
Saturday, May 19, 2012
8 AM to 3 PM
Communication 202
University of Washington, Seattle

The Keywords for Video Game Studies graduate interest group (GIG) at the University of Washington invites game scholars, artists, designers, developers, and enthusiasts to participate in our one-day colloquium on critical gaming.  The colloquium, broadly themed by the keywords “research/design,” is the capstone event to our year-long series of workshop sessions on “democracy,” “time,” “altplay/fandom,” “gold farming,” and “hack/customization” and hopes to provide a space for individuals and groups to present their work, to discuss and collaborate on what it means to study or make digital games, to network, and to play games.

In the introduction to How to Do Things with Videogames, Ian Bogost argues for “the many uses of videogames, and how together they make the medium broader, richer, and more relevant” (7).  He continues, “I take for granted that understanding games as a medium of leisure or productivity is insufficient.  Instead, I suggest we imagine the videogame as a medium with valid uses across the spectrum, from art to tools and everything in between” (7).  The Keywords colloquium takes up this call to imagine the power, potential, and practices of videogames as objects of study, design, critique, and fun.

Our colloquium then invites “lightning” presentations, demonstrations, or performances that engage (suggested but not limited to):

Video games and research                            Video games and play/work
Video games and academia                           Video games and teaching
Video game code, design, development       Video games industry/marketing
Video games and activism/politics               Video games and art/poetics/performance
Video games and fandom/community         Video games and other media
Video games and war                                     Video games and storytelling

Send a brief abstract or rationale (500 words or less) for your presentation to critgame@uw.edu by 5 PM on Friday, April 13, 2012 *deadline extended*.  Colloquium sessions will be roundtable, discussion format organized around short programs (6-8 “lightning” talk presenters) or long programs (1-3 presenters or extended performance or demonstration).  Short program presentations should be less than 5 minutes to allow for question and answer and conversation.  These should not be conference paper style presentations, but rather provide introductions, provocations, or focused interventions into your work, your project, or your idea.  Long program presentations can be more fully developed game play walk-throughs, performances, or interactive demonstrations.  Please include along with your abstract the names, emails, titles, affiliations or institutions of presenters, and your A/V requirements.

Participants will be notified of their acceptance by email by April 20, 2012.  Participants, if accepted, will need to arrange for travel, transportation, lodging, and equipment on their own.  Unfortunately, the Keywords group is unable to provide any funding for expenses.

The Keywords for Video Game Studies working group, in collaboration with the Critical Gaming Project at the University of Washington and the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory (HASTAC), is supported by the Simpson Center for the Humanities.

Download the RESEARCH/DESIGN Keywords Colloquium CFP.

GAMER Colloquium Follow-up | Gamification

May 25th, 2011

Last Saturday’s GAMER Colloquium was a fitting close to the Keywords for Videogame Studies Graduate Interest Group. It brought together truly diverse participants including scholars, students, educators, developers, journalists, and, of course, gamers for a broad-ranging and through-provoking discussion. Despite the variety of perspectives contributing, a core set of concerns emerged from the stated themes of GAMIFICATION and GAMER. The central question of the day, to which we returned in many forms, was how does gaming become meaningful or significant? I’ll recap the first session here and the second session in a post later this week.

Though one might presume that this is an obvious question or that there was already a good answer if we are discussing gaming in an academic setting. Yet, it is precisely because the meaning of videogames is such an ill-defined “mangle” that the Keywords group has been so productive this year. Further, recent attempts to “gamify” everything from school to advertising often are hinged on the expectation that gaming is somehow inherently significant, that the structure of a game makes any activity meaningful to the participants. Against this assumption, our day-long discussion demonstrated just how complicated

Mark Chen opened the first session by defining ‘gamification’ as ‘a way of providing incentives’ and expressed concern that these incentives normalize the accrual of cultural capital which may have negative effects on emergent play. Joshua Gerrish followed by breaking down the what drives gamers to game, highlighting goal-setting, status or affirmation, reputation, norms of reciprocity, time pressure, scarcity, set completion, reinforcement schedules, and loss aversion or sunk costs.

Screenshot. Frontierville

Next, Eliot Hemingway used gaming as a metaphor to talk about motivation and apathy in education, which he tied back to the objectivization of learning. He wondered aloud if the mechanized acheivement system represented by many models of a gamified classroom abstract the purpose of learning and actually get in the way of discovering goals on one’s own. Theresa Horstman then addressed the uses of gaming in the classroom. She explained that assumptions about e-learning are often in direct conflict with game-design best practices. As the trend moves from attempting to incorporate mini or commercial games into the classroom to developing whole games for educational purposes, she argued that instructional designers would do well to recognize the limitations of linear instructional strategies and allow for learners to identify and define their own learning objectives.

Kris Knigge followed by discussing the often restrictive space game journalism occupies between developers and the gamer community. This lead to an open conversation about how game journalism has formed the way it has and how the gamer community came to be so resistent to critical gaming. We talked about the ferver with which gamers identify as such and/or with a particular game and recognized this self-identifying tendency as central to the appeal of gamification practices. Gamification as a marketing strategy typically aspires to cultivating ‘fanboy’ or ‘fangirl’ levels of brand loyalty. This suggests the underlying strategies of ‘gamification’ have a much longer history in capitalism rather than originating with the recent the success of Farmville or coming out of 21st-century gamer culture as is often presumed.

We made reference here to McKenzie Wark’s Gamer Theory and his description of contemporary culture as gamespace. In this context, some of the base assumptions about gamification were challenged, such as whether or not gamification is possible if culture isn’t a level playing field. Further, in a gamified culture, some of the less savory practices of contemporary gamer culture such as griefing, trolling, hacking, and so on, which in many ways disrupt or out-right reject reputation systems and other gamified models, might play an important socio-political resistence roles. We acknowledged that these practices are often immature and insensitive at best as we raised the question of how to cultivate sincere contemplation that is not the product of or subject to logics of accumulation. The first session concluded with the suggestion that perhaps it is the structure of gaming itself that makes sincere analysis difficult or, at least, a mismatch between the types of responses gaming elicits and the outcomes we keep calling for. “Fun,” like any other engagement, is an affordance of the game being played, which means maybe we need to access different kinds of “fun.”

GAMIFICATION+GAMER Colloquium Full Program

May 10th, 2011

Program:

9:00 AM-10:00 AM Registration & Welcome

10:00 AM-12:00 PM Session I: “Gamification”

The morning session will engage the questions, issues, and challenges of game development, game commodification, and games as life.  How might scholars, teachers, writers, and developers think about the trend to gamify everything and the recent multi-billion dollar investment in gamification?  Gamification.org defines gamification as “the concept that you can apply the basic elements that make games fun and engaging to things that typically aren’t considered a game.  In theory you can apply Game Design to almost anything including Education, Health, Work and more.  Gamification at its core is about fun, rewards and social connections.  It has the opportunity to connect people in ways never seen before.”  What are the theories and possibilities of fun and games?  What are the critiques and problems of fun and games?

Mark Chen, “The Mangle of Gaming to Socially Create Meaningful Experiences,” Advancing Gaming in Innovative Learning Ecologies (AGILE), Institute for Science and Math Ed, LIFE Center, UW

Joshua Gerrish, “Incentive-Centered Design is Related to Gamification and Game Mechanics,” Founder gaming and gamification startups Empty Box and Reciprocade

Eliot Hemingway, “Games and Classroom Education,” Comparative History of Ideas, UW

Theresa Horstman, “Approaches in Game Design for Learning,” Department of Education, UW

Kris Knigge, “Video Game Blogging and Journalism,” Associate Editor at Siliconera.com and founding member of Sega-Addicts.com, Department of English, UW

Timothy Welsh, Moderator, Department of English, UW

12:00 PM-1:00 PM Lunch/Break

1:00-3:00 PM Session II: “Gamer”

In “Growing Up Gamer,” researcher and designer Jane McGonigal says, “We cherish the time we’ve spent playing games.  We love what games give us the power to do.  We love who games give us the opportunity to become.  And with every additional generation that grows up playing games, there are more and more of us who see gaming as a way to have the best kinds of experiences, to make the best kinds of friendships and lifelong partnerships, to do the most amazing work, and to become the best possible version of ourselves.”  The afternoon session will engage video games and play, art, community, and cultural critique.  How might scholars, artists, developers, and players think about games as cultural artifact and popular culture?

Megan Bertelsen, “Environments of Flesh: Body and Flesh in the Fantasy RPG Environment,” Department of Comparative Literature, UW

Blaine Doherty, “Close Playing of LIMBO,” Comparative History of Ideas, UW

Taya Huang, “Immersion and Assassin’s Creed,” Departments of Biochemistry and Scandinavian Studies, UW

Nathan Moller, “Machinima and Game Cinematics,” 5th Cell Media

Terry Schenold, “RPG Games & Memory,” Department of English, UW

Gary Walsh, Jr., “Taming the Monster: Violence, Spectacle, and the Virtual Animal,” Comparative History of Ideas, UW

Edmond Chang, Moderator, Department of English, UW

Presenter’s Bios:

Megan Bertelsen is a Master’s student with the Department of Comparative Literature, emphasizing media studies.  Prior to coming to the University of Washington, she worked primarily in horror and splash cinema, queer theory, and critical theory.  She is currently researching protocols and policing of identity production in sustained online gaming communities, particularly MMORPGs, as shaped by the interpenetration of the internal economies of these communities with more conventional iterations of the global economy.

Edmond Chang is a Ph.D. Candidate in English at the University of Washington.  He received his M.A. in English from the University of Maryland.  His main areas of interest are contemporary US fiction, technoculture, cultural studies, queer theory, teaching, role-playing games, video games, and popular culture.  His article “Gaming as Writing, Or, World of Warcraft as World of Wordcraft” was published in the Fall 2008 Computers & Composition Online.  He has taught at the university level for over twelve years and was the recipient of the UW Excellence in Teaching Award in 2009.

Mark Chen’s research focuses on teamwork, communication, and group expertise in situated gaming cultures. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington, looking at the practice of a specific group of gamers in the online game World of Warcraft.  He is currently a post-doctoral scholar at the UW Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, helping to evaluate player learning of science and math games such as Foldit and Refraction. He is a founding member of Advancing Gaming in Innovative Learning Ecologies (AGILE).  You can read more about Mark on his blog at http://markdangerchen.net

Blaine Doherty is a student in the Comparative History of Ideas (CHID) at the University of Washington.

Joshua Gerrish is a recent University of Michigan School of Information graduate, where he specialized in Incentive-Centered Design and Social Computing.  Previous to this, he earned a Bachelor’s degree in Cognitive Science.  He is currently the founder and principal software engineer of a location-based gaming and consulting startup in Seattle, Empty Box LLC (also DBA Reciprocade).  Josh is interested in the intersection between technological and social systems, and the amazing possibilities that open up when you begin designing and building systems with people in mind.

Eliot Hemingway is a senior undergraduate student with a longtime interest in methods of learning.  He has been a gamer for over a decade and has brought that passion and perspective into his educational experience.  Eliot has facilitated three CGP-affiliated focus groups under the CHID program (Actions Speak Louder, The Ninja Matters, and Challenging Forth).

Theresa Horstman is a doctoral student in Learning Sciences at the University of Washington.  She received her B.A. with a focus in philosophy from The Evergreen State College and her M.Ed. from the University of Washington.  Her interests include comparative analysis of video game and e-learning design methodologies and the correlation between the metaphoric process and creative process in designing instruction for virtual environments.

Taya Huang is a UW student aiming to double major in Biochemistry and Scandinavian Studies.  She is also an art student at Gage Academy of Art.  She is learning 3D modeling and whether she will model proteins or human figures or bones, she doesn’t yet know.

Kris Knigge is a sophomore majoring in English at UW.  He is also the Associate Editor at Siliconera.com and founding member of Sega-Addicts.com.

After working in the New York film and television industries, and then some award-winning work in the machinima medium, Nathan Moller joined BioWare and helped ship Mass Effect, Mass Effect: Bring Down the Sky, Dragon Age: Origins, Mass Effect 2, and the upcoming Star Wars: The Old Republic.  He now works for 5th Cell Media, the creators of Drawn to Life and Scribblenauts, in Bellevue, WA.

Terry Schenold is a Ph.D. candidate in English writing his dissertation “Reading and Reflection in the Novel and New Media,” which includes an exploration of digital roleplaying games as the best potential analog to literary media, as instruments for reflection, within the emerging digital media ecology.  He has taught several classes on digital games, most notably the seminar “Poetics of Play in Digital Roleplaying Games.”  He is also the founding member of the Critical Gaming Project.  His specific research interests in the field of game studies include ergodicity and narrative, all things having to do with time, sources of “immersion,” and comparative configurations of imaginative work in different game media.

Gary Walsh, Jr. is a UW senior majoring in Comparative History of Ideas with a minor in Anthropology.  He is also a humanities and writing tutor at Seattle Central Community College.  His research focus is on cultural authenticity, identity, and representation in relation to the commodity form.  Currently he is working on his senior thesis which examines my relationship to Japanese popular culture and how Japanese cultural productions are utilized in the construction of cosplay identities (individuals which dress as anime, manga, videogame characters) and the identities of American tourists in Japan.

Timothy J. Welsh is a Ph.D. Candidate in English at the University of Washington studying Twentieth Century US fiction and new media.  He received an M.Ed. from the University of Notre Dame while volunteer teaching at St. Louis High School in Louisiana, before completing an M.A. in English at Washington.  A version of his MA essay, “Everyday Play: Cruising for Leisure in San Andreas,” appears in the collection The Meaning and Culture of Grand Theft Auto.  His research interests include postmodern fiction, literary theory, contemporary art, digital media, and video games.  He is currently completing a dissertation entitled, “Immersive Fictions: Modern Narrative, New Media, Mixed Reality,” in which he reads contemporary novels in conjunction with popular video games to develop an approach to narrative media that responds to the expanded role of digital environments in contemporary life.

 

“GAMER” Colloquium, Sat. May 21, 9-3 PM, CMU 202, UW Seattle

May 2nd, 2011

GAMIFICATION+GAMER
Keywords for Video Game Studies Colloquium
May 21, 2011
9-3 PM
Communication 202
University of Washington, Seattle

____________________________________________________________

The Keywords for Video Game Studies colloquium invites game scholars, artists, designers, developers, and enthusiasts to participate in roundtable discussions, presentations of individual and collaborative work, scholarship, and play.  The colloquium, broadly themed by the keyword “gamer,” is the capstone event to a year-long series of workshop sessions on play, immersion/interactivity, avatar, power/control, and pedagogy.  The colloquium hopes to foster the growing engagement with what it means to study or make or play digital games.

The Keywords for Video Game Studies working group, in collaboration with the Critical Gaming Project at the University of Washington and the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory (HASTAC), is supported by the Simpson Center for the Humanities.  For more information about the Keywords group, go to: https://depts.washington.edu/critgame/wordpress/keywords/

The colloquium is free and open to University of Washington students, faculty, staff, and community.

Program

9:00 AM-10:00 AM Registration & Welcome

10:00 AM-12:00 PM Session I: “Gamification”

The morning session will engage the questions, issues, and challenges of game development, game commodification, and games as life.  How might scholars, teachers, writers, and developers think about the trend to gamify everything and the recent multi-billion dollar investment in gamification?  Gamification.org defines gamification as “the concept that you can apply the basic elements that make games fun and engaging to things that typically aren’t considered a game.  In theory you can apply Game Design to almost anything including Education, Health, Work and more.  Gamification at its core is about fun, rewards and social connections.  It has the opportunity to connect people in ways never seen before.”  What are the theories and possibilities of fun and games?  What are the critiques and problems of fun and games?

Featured Roundtable Presenters:

Mark Chen, “The Mangle of Gaming to Socially Create Meaningful Experiences,” Advancing Gaming in Innovative Learning Ecologies (AGILE), Institute for Science and Math Ed, LIFE Center, University of Washington

Joshua Gerrish, Incentive-Centered Design is related to “Gamification” and “Game Mechanics,” Founder gaming and gamification startups Empty Box and Reciprocade

Eliot Hemingway, “Games and Classroom Education,” Comparative History of Ideas (CHID), UW

Theresa Horstman, “Approaches in Game Design for Learning,” Department of Education, UW

Kris Knigge, “Video Game Blogging and Journalism,” Associate Editor at Siliconera.com and founding member of Sega-Addicts.com, Department of English, UW

Timothy Welsh, Moderator, Department of English, UW

12:00 PM-1:00 PM Lunch/Break

1:00-3:00 PM Session II: “Gamer”

In “Growing Up Gamer,” researcher and designer Jane McGonigal says, “We cherish the time we’ve spent playing games.  We love what games give us the power to do.  We love who games give us the opportunity to become.  And with every additional generation that grows up playing games, there are more and more of us who see gaming as a way to have the best kinds of experiences, to make the best kinds of friendships and lifelong partnerships, to do the most amazing work, and to become the best possible version of ourselves.”  The afternoon session will engage video games and play, art, community, and cultural critique.  How might scholars, artists, developers, and players think about games as cultural artifact and popular culture?

Featured Roundtable Presenters:

Megan Bertelsen, “Environments of Flesh: Body and Flesh in the Fantasy RPG Environment,” Department of Comparative Literature, UW

Blaine Doherty, “Close Playing of LIMBO,” Comparative History of Ideas (CHID), University of Washington

Taya Huang, “Immersion and Assassin’s Creed,” Departments of Biochemistry and Scandinavian Studies, UW

Nathan Moller, “Machinima and Game Cinematics,” 5th Cell Media

Terry Schenold, “RPG Games & Memory,” Department of English, UW

Gary Walsh, Jr., “Taming the Monster: Violence, Spectacle, and the Virtual Animal,” Comparative History of Ideas, UW

Edmond Chang, Moderator, Department of English, UW

CFP: Keywords “GAMER” Colloquium, May 21, University of Washington

February 7th, 2011

CALL FOR PARTICIPANTS

“GAMER”
Keywords for Video Game Studies Colloquium
Saturday, May 21, 2011
9 AM to 4 PM
Communication 202
University of Washington, Seattle

The Keywords for Video Game Studies graduate interest group (GIG) at the University of Washington invites game scholars, artists, designers, developers, and enthusiasts to participate in our one-day colloquium on critical gaming.  The colloquium, broadly themed by the keyword “gamer,” is the capstone event to our year-long series of workshop sessions on “play,” “immersion/interactivity,” “avatar,” “power/control,” and “pedagogy” and hopes to provide a space for individuals and groups to present their work, to discuss and collaborate on what it means to study or make digital games, to network, and to play games.

In “Growing Up Gamer,” researcher and designer Jane McGonigal says, “We cherish the time we’ve spent playing games. We love what games give us the power to do.  We love who games give us the opportunity to become.  And with every additional generation that grows up playing games, there are more and more of us who see gaming as a way to have the best kinds of experiences, to make the best kinds of friendships and lifelong partnerships, to do the most amazing work, and to become the best possible version of ourselves.”  The Keywords group takes this optimism and now asks how, what, and why.

Our colloquium then invites brief presentations, demonstrations, or performances that engage (suggested but not limited to):

Video games and play/work
Video games and other media
Video games and academia
Video games and teaching
Video games and activism/politics
Video games and art/poetics/performance
Video games and fandom/community
Video games and design/development
Video games and capitalism
Video games and storytelling

Send a brief abstract or rationale (500 words or less) for your presentation to critgame@uw.edu by 5 PM on Friday, April 1, 2011.  Colloquium sessions will be roundtable, discussion format organized around short programs (6-8 quickfire presenters) or long programs (1-3 presenters or extended performance or demonstration).  Short program presentations should be less than 10 minutes to allow for question and answer and conversation.  These should not be conference paper style presentations, but rather provide introductions, provocations, or focused interventions into your work, your project, or your idea.  Long program presentations can be more fully developed game play walk-throughs, performances, or interactive demonstrations.  Please include along with your abstract the names, titles, affiliations or institutions of presenters, and your A/V requirements.

Participants will be notified of their acceptance by email by April 8, 2011.  Participants, if accepted, will need to arrange for travel, transportation, lodging, and equipment on their own.  Unfortunately, the Keywords group is unable to provide any funding for expenses.

The Keywords for Video Game Studies working group, in collaboration with the Critical Gaming Project at the University of Washington and the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory (HASTAC), is supported by the Simpson Center for the Humanities.

Download the Call for Participants PDF.