Fellows

Graduates

Undergraduates

Wind Energy
The Center for Environmental Politics seeks to play a leading role in training next generation scholars of environmental politics and governance. We welcome UW students, graduate and undergraduate, from any department to participate in the Center’s activities. To be designated as a Graduate Fellow in Environmental Politics and Governance, students should get in touch with the Center Director, Aseem Prakash (aseem at uw.edu).  CEP Graduate Fellows will enjoy:

  • Invitations to all CEP-sponsored events, including talks and colloquia;
  • Invitations to join outside speakers for lunches and dinners;
  • Opportunities to participate in the annual Pacific NW Duck Family Graduate Workshop in Environmental Politics and Governance;
  • Invitation to participate in the 2-day overnight annual Camp Casey Whidbey Island retreat to discuss your research;
  • Opportunities to develop their academic networks by interacting with CEP faculty and outside visitors;
  • Apply for Mel Belding Travel and Research Grants for conference travel.

Graduate fellows, 2020-2021


Sandra Ahmadi

Sandra Ahmadi

Ph.D. student
Department of Political Science

Sandra Ahmadi is a political economist in the Department of Political Science whose primary research concerns central banking and monetary governance. Through quantitative analyses focused on monetary policymakers and other central bank staff as individual decision makers, she explores the climate impacts of currency systems. Before coming to the University of Washington, Sandra worked in underwriting for nearly a decade, where she was immersed in the realities of financial markets and their various actors. Sandra has a strong interest in the climate implications of central bank digital currencies and distributed ledger technology. She holds a BA in political science and economics from the University of Missouri at Kansas City.

Email: sahmadi4 AT u.washington.edu


Robert Anderson

Robert Anderson

Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Geography

Rob is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Geography. His research examines the practices of biodiversity conservation and ecological restoration as cultural and political processes, exploring the formation and reproduction of values and norms about wildlife and the “natural” world. His dissertation research uses ethnographic methods to examine the controversy and conflict over the return of wolves to the Pacific Northwest. Rob holds a B.A. in political science from Vassar College and an M.A. in geography from the University of Washington, and has professional experience planning and supervising ecological restoration projects in the Pacific Northwest.

Email: anderrm AT u.washington.edu


Ashli Blow

Ashli Blow

MPA Candidate
Evans School of Public Policy & Administration

Ashli Blow’s research interests include people-first policies, and how meaningful journalism about climate change can directly inform resiliency programs. Ashli started her career in broadcast newsrooms covering natural disasters as a breaking news producer for seven years. She then went on to work as a Public Information Officer for the Washington State Department of Natural Resources during wildfire and flooding seasons. Currently, in addition to her studies at the Evans School, Ashli is a freelance writer with bylines in The Guardian and Outside+, and she is a communications strategist at a Seattle-based agency that focuses on behavior change and public relations campaigns. Ashli graduated from the University of Memphis with a degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Communications, with a focus on journalism.

Email: ashlib AT u.washington.edu


Katie Breen

Katie Breen

Graduate Student
School of Environmental and Forest Sciences

Katie Breen is a graduate student researching Wildlife Ecology in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences. Her focus is on how climate change affects wildlife in northern climates, collaborating with researchers in Norway. She intends to use her conclusions to facilitate conservation planning for wildlife. Before joining the program, she worked on conservation policy at The Wilderness Society and energy efficiency policy on contract to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. She is a member of the Clean Energy Leadership Institute and the Seattle chapter for the grassroots group, 500 Women Scientists, which works to connect and mobilize women scientists around the globe to create action on policy. She holds a BA in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Princeton University.

Email: cbreen AT u.washington.edu


Meagan Carmack

Meagan Carmack

Ph.D. student
Department of Political Science

Meagan is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Political Science, with a focus on Latin American environmental politics. Her main research area is focused in environmental mandate enforcement, specifically endangered species mandate enforcement in Latin America, with strong interests in the ways state policies reflect environmental protective compliance, mixed methods, and comparative state policy in the Latin American region. Her current research focuses in on the mechanisms behind legal enforcement of endangered species mandates in Costa Rica post-2000 and the scholarly generation of policy recommendations adapted from Latin America to the United States.

Email: mcarmack AT u.washington.edu


Rachel Castellano

Rachel Castellano

Ph.D. student
Department of Political Science

Rachel is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Political Science, focusing on international relations and nonprofit studies. Her research interests include human trafficking, environmental migration, climate change advocacy, and political violence. Prior to her studies at UW, Rachel was the Program Director for StolenYouth, a Seattle-based nonprofit which raises funds and awareness for child sex trafficking in Washington state. Rachel holds a B.A. from Skidmore College.

Email: rcastell AT u.washington.edu


Rebeca de Buen Kalman

Rebeca de Buen Kalman

Ph.D. Student
Evans School of Public Policy and Governance

Rebeca de Buen Kalman started her Ph.D. in Public Policy and Management at the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance in 2015. Before joining the program, she worked as a corporate social responsibility analyst at KPMG Madrid and as a Program Associate at the Latin America Regional Climate Initiative sponsored by the ClimateWorks Foundation. Rebeca is interested in a broad range of issues about environmental policy, climate change policy, transportation, and public health. She holds a BS in physics from the National Autonomous University of Mexico and an MSc in Water Science, Policy and Management from Oxford University.

Email: rdebuen AT uw.edu


Dennis Duffin

Dennis Duffin

MPA Candidate
Evans School of Public Policy and Governance

Dennis Duffin is a graduate student at the Evans School focusing on Environmental Policy. He is interested in energy policy related to decarbonization, sustainability, and conservation. He holds a BA in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Princeton University, and has previously conducted research on caribbean invasive species interactions.

Email: dduffin AT uw.edu


Megan Erickson

Megan Erickson

Ph.D. candidate
Department of Political Science

Megan is a doctoral student in the Department of Political Science. She studies international relations and comparative politics, focusing on civil war and urban conflict. Currently, her research focuses on how cartel violence contributes to environmental degradation in Latin America. She holds an MSc in Conflict Studies from the London School of Economics and has worked for the Department of Defense on programs combatting the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, as well as several international NGOs.

Email: meganke AT u.washington.edu


MacKenzie Gaddy

MacKenzie Gaddy

MPA candidate
UW Evans School

MacKenzie is a second year MPA candidate at the UW Evans school. She is interested in the intersection of sustainability and international development as well as alternative economic models such as circular economies, de-growth and the Green New Deal. Before coming to UW, she earned a MSc from Uppsala University in Sweden and a BA in Humanities from Seattle University. MacKenzie also serves as the co-president of GreenEvans.

Email: gaddym AT u.washington.edu


Jeffrey Grove

Jeffrey Grove

Ph.D. student
Department of Political Science

Jeffrey studies American Politics and Political Theory, using a historical institutionalist framework to examine legal and political development. His research centers on issues of territorial expansion and western settlement, with a particular focus on how courts utilized available institutional mechanisms to enhance federal state control of Native nations. Jeffrey takes a strong interest in the intersections between indigenous sovereignty and environmental activism as well as the development of American jurisprudence on environmental law. He holds a B.A. in Political Science from Moravian College and an M.A. in Political Science from the University of Washington.

Email: jgrove91 AT u.washington.edu


Zhaowen Guo

Zhaowen Guo

Ph.D. student
Department of Political Science

Zhaowen Guo is a Ph.D. student in Political Science at the University of Washington. She holds a bachelor’s degree in political science at Fudan University (China) and a master’s degree in political science at Columbia University with Chinese Government Scholarship. Her research focuses primarily on the politics of information, with an emphasis on how technology and digital tools affect public discourses, social behavior, and government accountability in combating air pollution.

Email: zwguo AT u.washington.edu


Nick Hadjimichael

Nick Hadjimichael

Ph.D. student
Evans School of Public Policy and Governance

Nick Hadjimichael is a Ph.D. student at the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance. Prior to joining the program, he earned a MPP from the Price School at the University of Southern California and a BA in Public Policy Studies and in Economics from the University of Chicago. Previous work includes researching community power building and the just transition away from fossil fuels for the USC Equity Research Institute (formerly PERE) and evaluating the health co-benefits of the GEF’s Chemicals & Waste Portfolio for its Independent Evaluation Office. Nick’s research agenda is focused on environmental justice, climate change, and health geography. Current work centers on residential proximity to oil and natural gas production and on the cumulative health burden of environmental stressors and climate hazards.

Email: nickhadj AT u.washington.edu


Farrah Hasan

Farrah Hasan

MA student
School of Marine and Environmental Affairs

Farrah Hasan is a Master’s student at the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs. She holds Bachelor’s degrees in Chemistry and Creative Writing from Vanderbilt University. She has a research interest in climate migration and pursues projects related to policy and communication.

Email: farrah.hasan AT vanderbilt.edu


Brian Huang

Brian Huang

Ph.D. student
Department of Political Science

Brian Huang is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Political Science. Most broadly, Brian works at the intersection between political theory and environmental politics. Brian’s research is on the human/non-human divide in political thought with particular attention
to the instrumentally rational turn in human orientation to the environment. He seeks to uncover the theoretical roots of the ecological crisis and discover the implications of environmental policy that necessitates further domination and control of nature.
Brian holds a Masters degree from California State University Long Beach where he studied American Politics and Political Theory.

Email: bphuang AT u.washington.edu


Sarah Inman

Sarah Inman

Ph.D. student
Human Centered Design & Engineering

Sarah Inman is a doctoral student in the Human Centered Design and Engineering Program at the University of Washington. She has a background in Political Science and Science and Technology Studies. Her primary research interests include: 1) knowledge production and distribution through large-scale research; 2) individual and collective tensions when solving global problems such as climate change; 3) data science and visualization. For her master’s thesis, she conducted an ethnographic study of how citizens engaged with scientific data in the context of extractive industries. She also explored how citizens can use mobile air quality sensors to collect information about their environment. She is currently researching the challenges of drawing together heterogeneous Alaskan Salmon data from across diverse scientific and regulatory actors. She holds a Master of Arts from Georgetown University and is an aspiring mountain climber.

Email: sinman1 AT u.washington.edu


Steve Karceski

Steven Karceski

Ph.D. student
Department of Sociology

Steven is a doctoral student in the Sociology Department at the University of Washington. His research focuses on the political economy of environmental taxation, specifically how carbon tax policy is shaped by political institutions and societal beliefs. More generally, he is interested in political sociology, comparative historical sociology, and political economy. He earned a BA in Business and Economics from North Park University in Chicago. In the time between his undergraduate and graduate education he worked at the Chicago Board of Trade as an Options Clerk and Futures Trader, and later as an Investigator in the Regulatory Division at the Chicago Board Options Exchange.

Email: stevek7 AT u.washington.edu


Inhwan Ko

Inhwan Ko

Ph.D. student
Department of Political Science

Inhwan Ko is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Political Science with a focus on international relations and environmental politics. His research interests are climate policy and climate clubs, social movement, East Asia, quantitative research methods and politics of technology. He holds a Master’s degree in Political Science (Yonsei University, 2019) where he conducted a case study on the effect of transnational advocacy networks of Minamata disease (mercury poisoning) patients from 1972 to 2011, drawing from the fieldwork in Minamata, Japan. After participating in UNFCCC COP21 in 2015, he served as a steering committee member in a climate change NGO and produced a climate change podcast series in Korean from 2016 to 2019.

Email: inhwanko AT u.washington.edu


Griffin Lerner

Griffin Lerner

MPA Candidate
Evans School of Public Policy and Governance

Griffin is an MPA student with interests in Environmental Policy and Local Government Management. As an undergraduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, he developed a burgeoning interest in humans’ ever changing relationship to the natural world, taking relevant coursework in anthropology, sociology, and history. He also recently served as a Teaching Assistant for Nathan Roberts’ History of the Environment course. Currently, he is studying how to best leverage behavioral science in effectively communicating climate change to diverse audiences, as well as doing a policy analysis on shoreline management approaches in small coastal towns.

Email: glerner AT u.washington.edu


David Lucas

David Lucas

Ph.D. Student
Department of Political Science

David Lucas is a doctoral student in the department of political science studying political theory, international relations, and public law. His research interests include deliberative democratic theory, human rights, as well as theories of sustainability. He is particularly interested in the practice of deliberation and “truth seeking” as an alternative logic within international relations. He holds an M.A in Conflict Resolution and B.A in Philosophy from Portland State University, and has worked previously for various international organizations abroad.

Email: dclucas AT u.washington.edu


Nela Mrchkovska

Nela Mrchkovska

Ph.D. Student
Department of Political Science

Nela is a Ph.D. student at the Department of Political Science, studying comparative politics, political economy, and methodology. Her research examines the discourse of religious leaders on environmental degradation and the influences of religious institutions on climate beliefs and climate change policy. Nela holds an MA in Global Economics and Development from the University of Oklahoma.

Email: nelam AT u.washington.edu


Daniel Olsen

Daniel Olsen

Ph.D. Student
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Daniel Olsen graduated from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering and Electric Power Engineering. Before coming to the University of Washington, he worked at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researching industrial demand response capabilities. His current research focus is on regulatory policies which incentivize the construction and operation of low-carbon power systems. Specifically, he develops models of power systems, including decisions by independent stakeholders, and uses those models to determine the optimal degree to which various policies (e.g. carbon pricing, efficiency standards, grid-scale storage) should be implemented in order to achieve carbon emissions reductions goals.

Email: danieljolsen AT gmail.com


Christianna Parr

Christianna Parr

Ph.D. Student
Department of Political Science

Christianna is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Political Science and a steering committee member of the Equality Initiative in Political Science. Her main area of research is international relations and comparative politics, focusing on the region of South East Asia. She has a strong interest in the relationships civil society has with states and international organizations. Additional interests include the political strategies employed by environmental NGOs, ecofeminism, and human rights in Malaysia and Singapore. Her research focuses on the ascension efforts of NGOs in international organizations, and the types of NGOs that are given ascension status. She holds a B.A. in Political Science from the University of Washington and previously attended Taylor’s University in Malaysia.

Email: parr182 AT u.washington.edu


Michael Quinlan

Michael Quinlan

Graduate student
Department of Communication

Michael Quinlan is a graduate student studying communication in digital media. His areas of focus include habit formation, motivational interviewing, and the science of storytelling for environmental change. As part of his studies, he produces mission driven videos for nonprofits and government organizations addressing environmental issues, including the Pacific Coast Shellfish Growers Association and Seattle Public Utilities. Michael holds a B.A in political science from the University of Vermont.

Email: quinlanm AT uw.edu


Andres Sheikh

Andres Sheikh

MPA Candidate
UW Evans School of Public Policy & Governance

Andres is pursuing a specialization in Environmental Policy. He has over two years experience in the nonprofit sector campaign organizing and researching issues to protect public lands. As an undergrad at UC Berkeley he majored in Political Science with a concentration in International Relations and has taken coursework with an emphasis on Conservation and Resource Studies. His research interests are evaluating climate change and international environmental policy impacts to political institutions and international relations.

Email: amsheikh AT u.washington.edu


Morgan Wack

Morgan Wack

Ph.D. student
Department of Political Science

Morgan is a doctoral student in the Department of Political Science. He studies the how domestic institutions in developing countries influence the proliferation of new technologies and impact local responses to environmental degradation. Currently, his research is focused on discerning how communication technologies can serve to augment efforts aimed at mitigating the deleterious impacts of climate change and violence in sub-Saharan Africa. He holds an MSc in Global Politics from the London School of Economics, has served as a Princeton in Africa Fellow, and has worked for a variety of developmental organizations, NGOs, and government agencies.

Email: mwack AT u.washington.edu


Hanjie Wang

Hanjie Wang

Ph.D. student
Department of Political Science

Hanjie is a Ph.D. Student in the Department of Political Science. She studies international relations, focusing on international environmental politics and international law. Currently, her research interests include 1) global politics of renewable energy, the dynamic between energy transition and international political order; the issues of transnational environmental migrations, in particular international regulations and human rights; and 3) eco-feminism. She holds a Master’s degree in International Affairs from the Graduate Institute, Geneva (IHEID), and has worked for the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD).

Email: hjwang AT u.washington.edu


Nicolas Wittstock

Nicolas Wittstock

Ph.D. student
Department of Political Science

Nicolas Wittstock, PhD student in the Department of Political Science.
Nicolas studies the governance and international political economy of innovation and technology, focusing specifically on climate innovation.
He holds an MA in International Political Economy from King’s College London, UK and a BA in Political Science and Economics from the University of Mannheim, Germany.

Email: nwitts AT u.washington.edu


Matt Ziegler

Matt Ziegler

Ph.D. student
Department of Computer Science and Engineering

Matt Ziegler is a Ph.D. student in Computer Science with a background in ecological informatics, studying computing for underserved communities and developing countries. His research currently focuses on tools for natural resource management and environmental conservation in places where remoteness and socioeconomic factors present challenges for technology deployments, with particular interests in technologies for conservation project management and governance by local populations, and for facilitating communication and understanding between different participant groups. He holds a B.S. from University of Wisconsin in Computer Science and Biological Aspects of Conservation, and has previously worked on software for ecology research.

Email: mattzig AT cs.washington.edu


Undergraduate fellows, 2020-2021


Jack Anderson

Jack Anderson

Political Science and Economics

Jack is an undergraduate student majoring in Political Science and Economics, with a focus in Environmental and Natural Resource Economics. Since coming to the University of Washington he has participated in several local and national political campaigns and has acted as an instructor for First Year Programs at UW. His current research interests include the economics of environmental policy, sustainability in the corporate sector, and climate change adaptation policies and strategies.

Email: jackand AT u.washington.edu


Emily Asplin

Emily Asplin

Law, Societies, and Justice Department; Jackson School of International Studies

Emily is an undergraduate student in the Interdisciplinary Honors Program studying Law, Societies, and Justice and International Studies in the Environmental Track. She is interested in environmental justice, climate infrastructure, and energy security, both in the US and internationally. Her current research focuses on the governance processes behind grid modernization and its impact on gender equity. Emily has worked on state and national political campaigns and is the founder and president of the Environmental Policy Student Association at UW.

Email: easplin AT u.washington.edu


Megan Baffaro

Megan Baffaro

Depts. of Political Science and Law, Societies, and Justice

Megan is an undergraduate student double majoring in Political Science and Law, Societies, and Justice, with a minor in Human Rights. She is a member of the Interdisciplinary Honors Program, and an undergraduate fellow for the Center for American Politics and Public Policy. She is interested in a variety of topics including environmental injustice, political polarization, human rights, and political theory. Through the Political Science Honors Program, Megan is currently researching the influence of elite messaging on climate change polarization, and the potential of a united elite for promoting climate policy.

Email: megb1717 AT u.washington.edu


Sam Barbezat

Sam Barbezat

Department of Political Science

Sam is a senior majoring in Political Science. Prior to enrolling at the University of Washington, Sam gravitated towards working outdoors, including several years in tree work, and in outdoor education, where he facilitated nature connection programs for children and adults. Through a fellowship with the Center for American Politics and Public Policy, he is currently researching the relationship between time in nature and pro-environmental behavior. Through the School of Environmental and Forestry Sciences, Sam also serves as a research assistant for the Prugh Lab, compiling data on mesopredator behavior in Washington State.

Email: barbezat AT u.washington.edu


Clement J. Bermudes Jr.

Clement J. Bermudes Jr.

Depts. of Political Science and Geography

Clement is an undergraduate student majoring in Political Science, on the Political Economy option, and minoring in Geography. His academic and research interests center on political-military affairs, international trade/political economy/development, and climate policy as it relates to the Pacific Rim. Currently, his research focuses on economic development in the Northern Mariana Islands. In the past, Clement has served as an Elections Official in Texas, conducted academic study at the United States Military Academy (West Point), and currently serves as an undergraduate intern at the United States District Court for the Northern Mariana Islands.

Email: cjmudes AT u.washington.edu


Forrest Brungardt

Forrest Brungardt

Depts. of Political Science and Geography

Forrest is an undergrad at the University of Washington in the Environmental Studies program. His interests include climate advocacy, community organizing, and gardening. Forrest advocates for comprehensive climate policy as the founder and chair of Sierra Club at the University of Washington and a member of the Sierra Club Seattle executive committee.

Email: forrest1 AT u.washington.edu


Nate Constan

Nate Constan

International Studies and Political Science

Nate is an undergraduate student double majoring in International Studies and Political Science, with an emphasis in Environmental Studies. Nate first came into the University of Washington as an Environmental Sustainability and Resource Management major but quickly found that his passions and skills were best cut out for the policy side of climate mitigation. He is interested in the “greening” of economies, political reform, and Scandinavia’s model of capitalism, coined “Eco-Capitalism”. Previously, Nate has independently researched topics that complement his interests, his most recent being the correlation between coronavirus, climate change, and capitalism.

Email: nbc4 AT u.washington.edu


Denise Anne Devlyn

Denise Anne Devlyn

School of Oceanography

Denise Devlyn is a sophomore in the School of Oceanography. She is very interested in researching issues involving water quality and coastal ecosystems. Denise believes it is important to bring an interdisciplinary approach to her STEM interests so she wishes to explore how policy and regulation can have an effect on our global water systems. On-campus, Denise is a Research Assistant at the Armbrust Oceanography lab monitoring picophytoplankton populations and she is also an athlete on the Woman’s Rowing team.

Email: ddevlyn AT u.washington.edu


Mason Green

Mason Green

Depts. of Political Science and Informatics

Mason (he/him/his) is a sophomore transfer student from Whatcom Community College, where he graduated with an Associates in General Engineering. Seeking a Political Science and Informatics degree, he hopes to learn how to synthesise information technologies with complex political issues. Mason is extremely interested in how advanced computing algorithms, data analysis, and machine learning can be used to better understand large scale political and institutional issues, specifically climate change. Mason is currently researching Alaska’s Permanent fund dividend – a form of Universal Basic Income- looking to examine how it has affected the state holistically, and works as a Back-End developer on a UW Start-up, AvePass. In the past, Mason has worked as a student advocate serving at Whatcom as ASWCC Student Body President and Senator. In Mason’s free time he runs with the Husky Run Club and is an avid music listener.

Email: msaongreen511 AT gmail.com


Hannah Harris

Hannah Harris

Depts. of Sociology and Geography

Hannah is an undergraduate student double majoring in Sociology and Geography, pursuing the Environment, Economy and Sustainability Track. Her interests include climate change advocacy, political organizing, and community outreach. By pursuing her chosen fields, Hannah hopes to develop her skills in multimedia education to provide accessible information to communities affected by environmental harms. In the past, Hannah has worked with HFS SEED to spread awareness of on-campus sustainability and the Washington Bus to increase political action with Seattle youth. Hannah is currently working with UW EcoReps and Sunrise UW to continue advocating for policy change to mitigate the climate crisis and other Environmental Justice issues within the local community and beyond.

Email: hannahja AT uw.edu


Eva Jacroux

Eva Jacroux

Department of Political Science

Eva is an undergraduate student majoring in Political Science and minoring in Data Science. She is interested in climate finance, colonialism studies, and international development. Eva is a Boren Scholar who will be traveling to Morocco to learn Arabic, while conducting research on rising foriegn renewable energy investment as a national security strategy and its neocolonial implications. Since coming to the University of Washington, Eva has gained work experience as a congressional intern, student organizer, and grassroots canvasser. Currently, she is interning at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, aiding research and data analysis on national security issues.

Email: jacroe AT uw.edu


Lily Kinyon

Lily Kinyon

Department of Political Science and International Studies

Lily is an undergraduate student majoring in Political Science and International Studies with a focus on Environmental Studies and Italian. She is interested in international environmental policy, corporate climate governance, and electoral systems/politics. She hopes to utilize her dual degrees to pursue an MPA in Environmental Policy with the goal of working internationally on climate policy. Lily previously worked as Field Manager in a state political campaign, volunteered with WashPIRG to ban plastics in Washington State, and currently works on the executive board of Pi Sigma Alpha as Director of Communications.

Email: lilyk21 AT uw.edu


Zoe Lew

Zoe Lew

Environmental Studies

Zoe is an undergraduate student majoring in Environmental Studies, with a focus in climate justice and environmental policy. She is interested in policy and research on reducing and preparing for climate change impacts on human health. Since coming to the University of Washington, she has lobbied to Washington state’s House of Representatives and Senators for the University of Washington and is currently a research assistant for Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy and Asthma Research at Stanford University.

Email: zoelew AT u.washington.edu


Sydney Lyman

Sydney Lyman

Depts. of Political Science and Environmental Studies

Sydney Lyman is an undergraduate student majoring in Political Science with minors in Environmental Studies and Ethics. Her current interests include global environmental policy, institutional sustainability, the ethics of climate change, and the intersection of climate change and capitalism. Sydney is the recipient of several philanthropy honors, including the Young Philanthropist award from Spokane County United Way, for her community service and organizing efforts. At UW, Sydney is active with First Year Programs as a environmental studies FIG instructor and writes for the student newspaper The Daily, focusing on environmental issues and current events.

Email: sydlyman AT u.washington.edu


Emma Maggioncalda

Emma Maggioncalda

Environmental Science & Resource Management, Urban Design & Planning

Emma is an undergraduate student in the Departmental Honors Program of Environmental Science and Resource Management (ESRM), minoring in Urban Design & Planning (URBDP). Within the UW Urban Infrastructure Lab she has done research with the Climate-Smart CIP group and served as the policy analyst to provide context in the UW Campus Solar Plan with the RSO UW Solar. Her main interests involve leveraging governmental relationships and resources to provide planning guidance to local jurisdictions and promote sustainable, resilient infrastructure investment targeted to provide services to historically disadvantaged groups.

Email: emmamagg AT u.washington.edu


Phillip Meng

Phillip Meng

Interdisciplinary Honors Business Administration, Finance

Phillip Meng is an undergraduate student in the Interdisciplinary Honors program studying finance. He is interested in the role of climate change/sustainability in trade and foreign policy, green finance, and public opinion towards environmental issues. Phillip has been a research assistant in the Jackson School of International Studies and created the Polling and Open Data Initiative at the University of Washington, a public-interest data analytics student organization. In 2022, he is serving on the council of the Pacific Chapter of the American Association for Public Opinion Research.

Email: pmeng AT u.washington.edu


Aditi Menon

Aditi Menon

Applied and Computational Mathematical Sciences

Aditi Menon is a sophomore at the University of Washington. She is pursuing a bachelor’s degree in Applied and Computational Mathematical Sciences with a concentration in Social and Behavioral Sciences and minoring in Public Policy. At UW she is involved in a variety of organizations like UW Consulting Association and the editorial committee at HOMEROOM UW. She has always been passionate about using her dual mathematical and statistical experience and social science background to conduct research in public policy. Aditi is particularly interested in researching a just transition to clean energy, corporate sustainability, and the economics of environmental policy. She hopes to pursue a career in environmental and sustainability policy analysis.

Email: aditim15 AT u.washington.edu


Sarah Tucker

Sarah Tucker

Depts. of Political Science and Law Societies and Justice

Sarah is an undergraduate student majoring in Political Science and Law Societies and Justice. She is interested in a broad range of topics regarding immigration, climate advocacy, and legal reform. Her current interests include the intersection of private enterprise and public policy in the response to climate crises and the relative availability of legal services to minorities, immigrants, and the poor. Sarah recently completed an internship with the King County Bar Association.

Email: sbronwynt AT gmail.com


Jessica Vollbrecht

Jessica Vollbrecht

Depts. of Political Science and International Studies, Jackson School

Jessica is an undergraduate student majoring in Political Science, with a focus in Political Economics, alongside minoring in International Studies from the Jackson School. She is interested in studying foreign relations, economic development, international trade and finance, and international climate policy. Her current research involves around the short and long term effects of environmental policy on major industries within the market, such as transportation.

Email: jessvoll AT u.washington.edu


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