Friday Harbor Laboratories
last modified July 22, 2012

Summer 2012 Courses



SUMMER SESSION A (5 weeks)

Monday, June 18 - Friday, July 20
Each course is 9 credits

1) MARINE INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (Biol 432)
2) ESTUARINE & COASTAL FLUID DYNAMICS (Biol 533)
3) COMPARATIVE INVERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY (Biol 533)
4) NEUROETHOLOGY (Biol 533)
5) FUNCTIONAL MORPHOLOGY AND ECOLOGY OF MARINE FISHES (Biol 533)

SUMMER SESSION B (5 weeks)

Monday, July 23 - Friday, Aug 24
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Feb 1st

Each course is 9 credits
1) ECOLOGY & CONSERVATION OF MARINE BIRDS & MAMMALS (Fish 492)
2) ECOLOGY OF INFECTIOUS MARINE DISEASE (Biol 533)
3) BIOMECHANICS (Biol 533)
4) MARINE ALGAE (Biol 533)

MOLECULAR ECOLOGY & ENVIRONMENTAL GENOMICS OF PHYTOPLANKTON (Biol 533)
COURSE CANCELLED for 2012 (may be offered in 2013)

SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE & CONSERVATION
(Biol 497) Students live and study on Shaw Island. COURSE CANCELLED for 2012 (may be offered in 2013)

SUMMER (8-12 weeks)
BLINKS-NSF REU RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP
Seeking senior undergrads, post-bacs or grad students from diverse cultural backgrounds, especially those under-represented in the sciences; includes financial support.

Independent Study for UW graduate students

POST-SUMMER
SCIENTIFIC DIVING
Non-credit short course
August 28 - September 9
Application deadline extended to June 1st

SUMMER 2012 Session A
Student application review begins February 1*

*Applications will be accepted past due date if space available. For information please contact Stacy Markman, FHL Student Coordinator.

Marine Invertebrate Zoology

Biol 432 (9 undergraduate-level credits)
Session A: June 18 - July 20, 2012 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Students arrive Sunday, June 17 after 3:00 p.m., depart Friday, July 20 after lunch.

Dr. Julia Sigwart
Queen's University Belfast

Dr. Mikhail Matz

University of Texas at Austin

Photo: M. Matz

Learning about the diversity of marine invertebrates is a daunting task; from giant squid to microscopic slugs living between grains of sand, every new group of species, habitats, bodies and lifestyles, exposes more and more new things to discover. Over 90% of the macroscopic species in the marine biosphere are “invertebrates”. The central theme in this course is a practical approach to managing this sometimes-overwhelming diversity, and to provide students with a toolkit of techniques and knowledge that will enable them to approach further independent study of invertebrate biodiversity with confidence.

Course material will focus on how animals interact with their environments (including body plans, life history, and physiology) and in understanding apomorphies of key invertebrate groups. The course will reveal abundant and recurrent correlations between various aspects of biology and morphology in multicellular animals, and demonstrates how this inter-connectedness affects evolutionary possibilities. We combine the “classical” study of functional morphology with the latest insights from paleontology, phylogenetics, and genomics.
As the course focuses on managing the vast diversity of invertebrate life, we will study living exemplars of most major groups of marine animals, through field collection, observation of living animals in the field and in the lab, and dissection. Students will also learn to produce publication-quality scientific drawings, representing their understanding of the specimens, and investigate specific problems through independent research projects. Friday Harbor is the best location in the US for such a course, given the spectacular local diversity in the San Juan Islands and a century of accumulated knowledge at FHL.


Enrollment is limited to 20 students.

For additional information, contact:
j.sigwart@qub.ac.uk
matz@mail.utexas.edu

And check out the video of this species retreating into its shell (something they do not do very willingly, but all that foot does fit into the shell):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nUGZ4lrquzU


Illustration: K. Zbranek (Invertebate Zoology student): drawing of the head of Nereis, a polychaete

And, a song about invertebrate chordates!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LNoHBU1He1o

Summer 2012 Inverts Syllabus
2012 Costs (estimated)
Student Information


Estuarine and Coastal Fluid Dynamics
Biol 533 (9 credits)

Please note: course is offered under the "umbrella" course Biology 533: Advanced Organismal Biology. Thus transcripts from University of Washington will list the course title ADV ORG BIOL rather than the specific Friday Harbor Laboratories' course title listed above.

Session A: June 18 - July 20, 2012 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, June 17 after 3 pm, depart Friday, July 20 after lunch.


Photo: Dr. Parker MacCready

Dr. Parker MacCready
University of Washington School of Oceanography

Dr. W. Rockwell Geyer

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

This is an intensive introduction to the physical oceanography of estuarine and coastal regions. The first half of the course is devoted to lectures, from the instructors and from several guest faculty, on fluid mechanics and processes intrinsic to these scales. We review shallow water flows, unstratified turbulence, tides and hydraulics, and stratified mixing driven by winds and tides. We also cover the coupled systems of estuarine dynamics, river plumes, and coastal circulation. The second half of the course focuses on student-designed experiments, either in the field or numerical. Students work in teams to develop their experiments, and each is expected to develop an individual project within that. Students write a short paper and give a presentation to document their work.

This course is a great way to develop a strong peer group with young scientists in their field, and to meet a number of researchers from different institutions. In addition, the waters around FHL provide some spectacular and challenging areas in which to understand environmental fluid dynamics.

Students are expected to have completed at least the first year of a graduate program in physical oceanography.

A more detailed course description is available through the following link:
http://faculty.washington.edu/pmacc/Classes/FHL_2012/syllabus.html

Please contact Parker MacCready pmacc@uw.edu, or Rocky Geyer rgeyer@whoi.edu for more information.

Enrollment is limited to 15 students.

Summer 2012 Estuarine Coastal Fluid Dynamics Syllabus
2012 Costs (estimated)
Student Information


Comparative Invertebrate Embryology
Biol 533 (9 credits)

Please note: course is offered under the "umbrella" course Biology 533: Advanced Organismal Biology. Thus transcripts from University of Washington will list the course title ADV ORG BIOL rather than the specific Friday Harbor Laboratories' course title listed above.

Session A: June 18 - July 20, 2012 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, June 17 after 3 pm, depart Friday, July 20 after lunch.

Dr. Billie Swalla
University of Washington
Biology Department

Dr. Charles (Brad) Shuster

New Mexico State University
Department of Biology

This course provides extensive hands-on laboratory experience with the fertilization and development of diverse animals. Phyla represented usually include the Porifera, Cnidaria, Ctenophora, Platyhelminthes, Nemertea, Mollusca, Annelida, Brachiopoda, Phoronida, Bryozoa, Echinodermata, Chordata, Chaetognatha, and Arthropoda.

In addition to the basics of invertebrate reproduction and development, lectures will also include analysis of morphogenetic processes, evolutionary changes in development, and functional consequences of different modes of development. Lab time will be devoted to obtaining, observing and documenting stages of embryogenesis. Lecture and lab practice will also introduce various techniques including (but not limited to) time-lapse microscopy, in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence. Field collecting trips to diverse habitats will acquaint students with the environments in which reproduction and development occur and diverse sources of embryos.

The course is intended to serve both marine biologists who wish to understand diversity in modes of development for ecological and evolutionary studies and developmental biologists who wish to broaden their knowledge of embryos beyond the standard model system organisms.

This is a graduate course, but exceptionally qualified undergraduates will be considered. We encourage applicants from foreign institutions and diverse scientific backgrounds.

Enrollment is limited to 15 students.

Photos: Brad Shuster

Faculty contact information:
bjswalla@u.washington.edu
cshuster@nmsu.edu



Summer 2012 Comparative Invertebrate Embryology Syllabus
2012 Costs
(estimated)
Student Information









Neuroethology
Biol 533 (9 credits)

Tritonia neuroethology in action in the Wyeth lab.

Please note: course is offered under the "umbrella" course Biology 533: Advanced Organismal Biology. Thus transcripts from University of Washington will list the course title ADV ORG BIOL rather than the specific Friday Harbor Laboratories' course title listed above.

Session A: June 18 - July 20, 2012 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, June 17 after 3 pm, depart Friday, July 20 after lunch.

Dr. James Murray
California State University, East Bay
Biological Sciences

Dr. Shaun Cain

Eastern Oregon University
Department of Biology

This 5-week graduate course will focus on learning techniques in neuroethological research such as behavioral recording and analysis, electrophysiology of intact and reduced preparations, and pharmacology, immunohistochemistry, and confocal microscopy of neural structures.  Each pair of students will explore a project that helps them to learn the techniques they need in their own research.  The course research will focus on the nudibranch sea slug Tritonia diomedea because of its amenability to neuroethological analysis and use as a teaching model.  Lectures will focus primarily on background necessary to understand fundamental techniques in neurophysiology as well as behavioural analysis.

This course is one of very few advanced courses offered worldwide on advanced topics in the neurobiology of behavior.  Neuroscience, like molecular biology and genetics, has tended over recent decades to emphasize reductionistic techniques that have been extremely fruitful in illuminating the basic principles of how cells function and interact in nervous systems.  But now we find that our ability to collect large data sets of recordings from dozens or hundreds of nerve cells have often outstripped our ability to relate these data back to the behavior of the organism, and ultimately to the ecological context of that behavior.  The  sea slug Tritonia  has served as a model system both in this reductionist approach, and also in a complementary neuroethological approach that focuses more on relating the activities of multiple nerve cells to behavior in a natural context. In particular, the system is ripe for an integrative analysis of how the animals orient using multimodal sensory cues and how their brains make ecologically-relevant decisions on a cellular level (e.g. how does a slug decide to turn right or left if it smells both food and predator).

Students will be paired for 4-week projects, each pair with its own "rig" of electrophysiological equipment.  The rigs will include neural activity amplifiers, digitization equipment to record data onto computers, microscopes to help guide the recording electrodes, and other devices as necessary.  We will instruct students in techniques such as intracellular recording, single-cell inactivation, whole nerve recording, and fine-wire recording in freely-moving animals. 

Photo: R. Wyeth

We will also teach students how digital video can be used to record and quantitatively analyze many aspects of behaviour how to correlate these data with neural activity. Possibilities include tracking animal movement and measuring components body movement, amongst others. Students will be exposed to lesion experiments that isolate behavioural function to specific neurons (through drug inactivation) or parts of the nervous system (by nerve cuts) by comparing behaviors between sham-operated animals with that of lesioned animals.  Students will also learn to label specific nerve cells using iontophoresis of fluorescent tracers, to immunolabel neural markers, and to process tissue for confocal microscopy. 
Neuroethology has historically been characterized by a focus on comparative, interdisciplinary, integrative, evolutionary, and ecologically-relevant approaches.  FHL has a long tradition of emphasizing these approaches and is an ideal location for the study of the neuroethology of navigation in Tritonia and other sea slugs.

Photo: R. Wyeth
Tritonia diomedea
in the midst of an escape swim that allows tidal currents to sweep the slug away from predatory seastars. We explore the neural circuits that control this and other behaviours.




Enrollment limited to 15 students.

Animation: This confocal image stack animation shows a 3-D view of four neurons that have been injected with a fluorescent tracer.  The largest cell body is ~100 microns wide.  By Dr. Jim Murray

Dr. Russell Wyeth's web pages:
Research Projects
Research Links
Videos and Images
Course syllabus
Dr. Jim Murray's web pages:
Tritonia Videos
Faculty profile

Slide show: Tritonia neuroethology in action in Wyeth lab.

Faculty contact information:
james.murray@csueastbay.edu
rwyeth@stfx.ca
shaun.cain@eou.edu

Syllabus
2012 Costs (estimated)
Student Information



Functional Morphology and Ecology of Marine Fishes
Biol 533 (9 credits)

Please note: course is offered under the "umbrella" course Biology 533: Advanced Organismal Biology. Thus transcripts from University of Washington will list the course title ADV ORG BIOL rather than the specific Friday Harbor Laboratories' course title listed above.

Session A: June 18 - July 20, 2012 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, June 17 after 3 pm, depart Friday, July 20 after lunch.

Ferry1

Dr. Adam Summers
University of Washington Friday Harbor Laboratories

Dr. Lara Ferry

Arizona State University
Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Dr. Andrew J. Clark
College of Charleston
Department of Biology

The course will use the diverse marine fish community of the San Juan Islands as a tool to explore the relationship between functional morphology and ecology. Students in the course will learn: 1) the evolutionary history and relationships of the major radiations of bony and cartilaginous fishes; 2) basic ecological principles as they relate to fish biology; 3) tools and techniques for collecting fishes; 4) basic morphology of cartilaginous and bony fishes; 5) tools and techniques of functional morphology.

Ferry 2

For the first several weeks of the course there will be daily lectures and field trips to familiarize students with the basic tools and animals that they will need for the latter portion of the course. For the second half of the course students will pursue an independent research project. A variety of projects will be suggested but it is also possible to come up with a completely original project based on personal interest. In the past, projects have covered a wide range of topics including ecology, eco-morphology, comparative physiology, comparative morphology and functional morphology. The course will culminate in an oral and written presentation of the results of the research project. This course has historically enjoyed a strong place in the training of functional morphological researchers and the learning goals reflect this.

Enrollment limited to 15 students.

Photos: Dr. Lara Ferry

For additional information contact:
fishguy@u.washington.edu


Syllabus
2012 Costs (estimated)
Student Information


SUMMER 2012 Session B
Student application review begins February 1st*

*Applications will be accepted past due date if space available. For information please contact Stacy Markman, FHL Student Coordinator.

Ecology and Conservation of Marine Birds and Mammals
Fish 492 (9 credits)

Session B: July 23 - August 24, 2012 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, July 22 after 3 pm, depart Friday, Aug. 24 after lunch.

Breck Tyler
Institute of Marine Sciences
University of California, Santa Cruz
Long Marine Laboratory

Eric Anderson
Center for Wildlife Ecology
Simon Fraser University

The Salish Sea supports a diverse community of marine birds and mammals. This intensive, field-based course offers motivated students the opportunity to learn about these ecologically and culturally important animals and the conservation problems they face. Perched at the edge of the San Juan Channel, the Friday Harbor Labs are a great place to develop the research skills needed to study a range of species including eagles, auklets, seals, and porpoises. We welcome applications from undergraduates, post-baccalaureates, and graduate students.

This course emphasizes first-hand learning and makes full use of the Labs’ research boats and facilities. Students will learn: 1) the systematics, morphology, physiology, and ecology of local species; 2) field identification and research techniques for studies of populations, behavior, diet, energetics, and other topics; 3) relationship of tides and other environmental variables to animal distribution and abundance; and 4) the status and conservation of local species. During the first two weeks, lectures, field trips, and lab demonstrations will familiarize students with the local fauna, their habitats, and relevant research techniques. For the next three weeks, students will conduct independent research on the ecology of local species and communities. Projects will cover a variety of topics and will be designed to gather data pertinent to pressing conservation problems. Students will present their results and discuss their findings in light of these conservation issues. Examples of past projects include effects of tidal currents on Harbor Seal haul out patterns, foraging behavior of molting Harlequin Ducks, and patterns in surface behaviors of Orcas.

Recent evidence suggests that populations of many seabirds and marine mammals are declining in the Salish Sea. However, available data are sparse and much additional study is needed. Student projects will contribute to a growing database of population trends in the San Juan Island region now being developed by other FHL courses and researchers. Cumulatively these data will help us better understand the ecology and status of local species.

Enrollment limited to 20.

For more information, contact Breck Tyler: ospr@ucsc.edu

Summer 2012 Fish 492 Syllabus
2012 Costs (estimated)
Student Information



Ecology of Infectious Marine Diseases
Biol 533 (9 credits)

Please note: course is offered under the "umbrella" course Biology 533: Advanced Organismal Biology. Thus transcripts from University of Washington will list the course title ADV ORG BIOL rather than the specific Friday Harbor Laboratories' course title listed above.

Session B: July 23 - August 24, 2012 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, July 22 after 3 pm, depart Friday, Aug. 24 after lunch.

Dr. Drew Harvell
Cornell University
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Dr. Steven Roberts
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences

Dr. Carolyn Friedman
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences

Infectious diseases of marine organisms are on the increase, and yet processes governing host infectivity and pathogen virulence are poorly known, especially for non-commercial marine invertebrates. Indeed, one of the emerging frontiers in ocean research is invertebrate-microbial interactions. Despite these knowledge gaps, the prediction is that diseases will increase in warming oceans and become an ever-present component of near-shore ecological interactions. This course will be a training program in invertebrate-pathogen ecology that will bring together and train the future leaders in this rapidly emerging, multidisciplinary field. The course will 1) survey host-pathogen interaction in the Friday Harbor region, 2) teach diagnostic tools for identifying viral, bacterial, protozoan and fungal infections of invertebrates, 3) teach approaches to examine the invertebrate innate immune response to different pathogens, and finally 4) use these methods to address ecological questions about the distribution of pathogenic interactions, and the experimental effects of temperature and increased acidification on interactions.
A primary goal of the program is to provide advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral investigators with a broad understanding of host-pathogen interactions as well as the techniques used to study the ecology of marine animals in situ. By bringing together top researchers in host-pathogen interactions, we provide students with a unique opportunity to work side by side with world experts using state-of-the-art tools and technologies. The program also provides a setting for developing and testing new technologies and methods. We also hope it will serve as a research magnet, attracting leading scientists to conduct their own research in a creative teaching and learning environment that catalyzes interactions across the various disciplines associated with Marine Disease Ecology.

In a broader sense, this project will add to our limited understanding of how climate change affects the ecological health of temperate coastal communities. It will also help to address basic information gaps concerning direct biological effects of climate change on susceptible species and the dynamics of parasitism and symbiosis. This understanding is critical to developing realistic management schemes for mitigating impacts of climate change.

This is an NSF-supported workshop-course.

Enrollment limited to 15 students.

Photo: Glenn VanBlaricom

For additional information contact: cdh5@cornell.edu, carolynf@u.washington.edu, or sr320@u.washington.edu

Summer 2012 Ecology of Infectious Marine Diseases Syllabus
2012 Costs (estimated)
Student Information



Biomechanics
Biol 533 (9 credits)

Please note: course is offered under the "umbrella" course Biology 533: Advanced Organismal Biology. Thus transcripts from University of Washington will list the course title ADV ORG BIOL rather than the specific Friday Harbor Laboratories' course title listed above.

Session B: July 23 - August 24, 2012 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, July 22 after 3 pm, depart Friday, Aug. 24 after lunch.

Dr. Emily Carrington
University of Washington
Friday Harbor Laboratories

Dr. Michael O'Donnell
University of Washington
Friday Harbor Laboratories

Dr. Patrick Martone

University of British Columbia
Department of Botany

This graduate level course uses an engineering perspective to evaluate the mechanical design of marine organisms. We will broadly study the mechanics of “fluids and solids” in order to develop an understanding of the diversity of ways organisms construct materials, organize body plans, and interact with other organisms and their environment. The first three weeks of the course will introduce biomechanical theories and techniques through lectures, laboratory exercises, and field activities. The final two weeks of the course are devoted to independent student research projects. The 2012 course focuses on two major themes:

1) Ecomechanics. Organisms must perform within the constraints of their physical environment. How have environmental parameters guided the evolution of organismal form and function, and how will future shifts in climate (temperature, water motion, ocean acidification, etc.) affect ecological performance? This year’s course will include a short module on marine carbonate chemistry.

2) Biomaterials. Material scientists increasingly look to nature for inspiration in the design of high-performance materials, such as the strong underwater adhesives of barnacles, the tough durable tethers of mussels, and the fracture resistant shells of snails. To date, relatively few marine biomaterials have been adequately characterized; the rich diversity of marine flora and fauna in the San Juan Islands will undoubtedly provide for novel observations.

Application review begins February 1, 2012. Enrollment is limited to 15 students and financial aid is available. Late applications will be considered if space is available.

Questions? Contact Emily Carrington at ecarring@uw.edu.

Summer 2012 Biomechanics Syllabus
2012 Costs (estimated)
Student Information



Molecular Ecology and Environmental Genomics of Marine Phytoplankton
COURSE CANCELLED for 2012 (may be offered in 2013)
Biol 533 (9 credits)

Please note: course is offered under the "umbrella" course Biology 533: Advanced Organismal Biology. Thus transcripts from University of Washington will list the course title ADV ORG BIOL rather than the specific Friday Harbor Laboratories' course title listed above.

Session B: July 23 - August 24, 2012 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, July 22 after 3 pm, depart Friday, Aug. 24 after lunch.

Dr. Robin Kodner
Lead Faculty
Beam Reach Marine Science and Sustainability School
Seattle, WA 98115
robin@beamreach.org

Dr. Adrian Marchetti
Assistant Professor
Department of Marine Sciences
3202 Venable Hall, CB# 3300
University of North Carolina
amarchetti@unc.edu

Phytoplankton are the most genetically diverse group of organisms in the marine environment, and play a central role in coastal and open ocean ecosystems as primary producers. Equally important, these organisms play a fundamental role in the global carbon cycle. Because of these important roles, phytoplankton are crucial to understand changing oceans and ecosystems. In recent years a combination of molecular techniques and genomics has increased our ability to quantitatively describe the composition of phytoplankton communities and the functional interactions between phytoplankton and their environment. This course will provide an integrated foundation to understanding phytoplankton diversity, ecology, physiology, and biogeochemistry that will cover a range of traditional lab and field methods to the most modern high throughput sequencing technologies. An emphasis will be placed on integrating methods for application in the lab and the field.

Photo: Marchetti
Natural phytoplankton assemblage from Puget Sound


This course will describe the broad diversity of phytoplankton groups from an evolutionary perspective and will explore various molecular and genomic-based tools for studying the diversity and physiology of these dynamic groups. Students will leave the course having explored the genome papers of all major phytoplankton groups, learned the history of molecular techniques in this field, and become familiar with bioinformatics techniques for comparative genomics and environmental genomics (metagenomics). From the bioinformatics and comparative genomics methods, the students will learn to form hypothesis in silico from existing sequence data, and then test these hypotheses in the lab or in the field using a mixture of methods presented though the course. The molecular and bioinformatics methods presented in the course are now necessary tools for all graduate students in biological oceanography and phycology, and this introduction will give students a practical introduction that will be applicable to their own projects. Students will then learn how to apply molecular tools such that they can bridge these techniques with physiological experimentation and ecological observations.

Enrollment will be limited to 15 students.

2012 Costs (estimated)
Student Information


Marine Algae

*Marine Algae 2012 Brochure
Biol 533 (9 credits)

Please note: course is offered under the "umbrella" course Biology 533: Advanced Organismal Biology. Thus transcripts from University of Washington will list the course title ADV ORG BIOL rather than the specific Friday Harbor Laboratories' course title listed above.

Session B: July 23 - August 24, 2012 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, July 22 after 3 pm, depart Friday, Aug. 24 after lunch.

Dr. Thomas F. Mumford
Marine Agronomics
Washington Department of Natural Resources, Div. of Aquatic Resources (Retired)

Dr. J. Robert Waaland
University of Washington
Biology Department

This course explores the biodiversity of marine algae with emphasis on their role in marine ecosystems. The course will have four major components: 1) Seaweed diversity will be investigated by introducing and practicing the techniques and skills essential for identification of marine macrophytes; 2) seaweeds from a diversity of habitats (e.g., intertidal, subtidal, sheltered and exposed, eelgrass beds, salt marshes) will be examined through field and laboratory studies of the seaweed-dominated marine communities accessible in the San Juan Archipelago and on the exposed outer coast of Vancouver Island; 3) collection, preservation and record keeping essential for biodiversity sampling and analysis will be emphasized; and 4) laboratory methods will emphasize the use of essential literature, databases, and microscopic examination to understand the morphological and reproductive diversity and the details required for identification of diverse seaweed taxa. We plan to include two dredging trips on the R/V Centennial for access to the deeper marine flora; we plan to use an underwater video camera system to examine seaweed communities in select localities.

The functional role of seaweeds in marine ecosystems will be examined through discussion, laboratory and field methods emphasizing the role of seaweeds as primary producers in coastal marine communities. The functional morphology of seaweeds and their role as primary producers in food webs, their function as structural elements in habitats and interactions with other marine community components will be explored. Lab and field exercises will include introduction to selected analytical gear (e.g., dissolved oxygen meters, nutrient analysis, and data loggers for temperature and light).

Quantitative analysis of the distributions and abundances of seaweed populations will be investigated by lectures, field and lab exercises. Emphasis will be placed on study designs, sampling procedures, methods of data analysis and data interpretation. Students will obtain experience with different field methods of sampling seaweeds and with handling and analyzing population and community data. Various approaches for analyzing assemblage or community data will be discussed. Practical applications such as the design of monitoring programs at multiple scales will be addressed; prior statistical knowledge is not a prerequisite.
Methods for cultivation of seaweeds will be investigated for use at laboratory to commercial scales as tools to elucidate algal life histories, growth rates and development patterns, and physiological responses. The use of mesocosms as experimental systems, and for production of food, chemicals and restoration will be discussed. Special emphasis will be placed on kelp monitoring and restoration techniques in the vicinity of Friday Harbor.
This is a course appropriate for marine biologists, botanists and ecologists as well as oceanographers with interests in marine biodiversity, environmental and conservation biology, ecosystem-based restoration, understanding critical coastal habitats for ESA-listed species, and coastal ecology with an emphasis on macroalgal primary producers. Graduate students and advanced undergraduates students (juniors, seniors) are encouraged to apply.

The FHL facilities and environment provide the ideal combination of laboratory facilities, housing and a great variety of marine habitats with “hot spot” biodiversity representative of cool-temperate marine habitats. Ready access to a diversity of field sites, to small boats, a larger research vessel, labs with running seawater aquaria for maintaining specimens and conducting experiments, excellent microscopy facilities, an excellent library and computing facilities with internet access make this an ideal environment for this course. Concurrent courses and research activities make it easy to develop interactions with students and researchers from around the globe in a variety of disciplines.

Enrollment limited to 15 students.

For additional information contact:
Bob Waaland (jrw@uw.edu)
Tom Mumford (tmumford@uw.edu).

Summer 2012 Marine Algae Syllabus
2012 Costs (estimated)
Student Information



Sustainable Agriculture and Conservation

COURSE CANCELLED for 2012 (may be offered in 2013)

Biol 497 (9 credits)
July 23 - August 24, 2012 (5 weeks)
Application Deadline: Feb. 1st or until filled

Students live and study at the Cedar Rock Preserve on Shaw Island, sleeping in tents.

Estimated $1000 Room and board fee.
Tuition fees posted at:
studentcosts2012

Dr. Elizabeth Wheat
University of Washington
Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellow
Program on the Environment
Education Coordinator - UW Farm

"Caminante, no hay camino, se hace camino al andar."
"There is no path. The path is made by walking."

-Antonio Machado

Objectives:

• Immerse participants in the study of sustainable food production
• Allow participants time to reflect deeply on our food system:
• Use the pedagogical technique of experiential education to help participants better understand the complexities embodied in dichotomies like: natural/unnatural, organic/conventional, sustainable/extractive.

Sustainable Agriculture Workshop topics:

Sustainable Agriculture:

Participants will explore the ecological connections of sustainable agriculture. How can agriculture take advantage of the structure of natural systems to help establish and maintain productive farms? This topic will cover cropping, crop rotation systems, ruminant animal ecology, introduction to soils (biotic and abiotic components), and vegetable crop production. Participants will work in groups to set up and follow field experiments on a sustainable agriculture topic of their choosing.

Forest Ecology:

This topic will develop participants’ understanding of forest ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest. The 370 acre cedar rock preserve consists of broad mixture open fields, woodlands, and several forest types. Much of the forest was logged yet a surprising level of habitat diversity and structural complexity is present. Also, many scattered and fire-scarred old-growth trees can be found—providing clues to the disturbance history of what was once a human maintained landscape. Participants will learn to identify common trees and shrubs, learn how forests develop and respond to disturbance, and learn how to assess and characterize different forest types. Participants will get a chance to be involved in one or more of the forest restoration projects that have been initiated on the preserve. Understanding native ecosystems is the first step in constructing agricultural systems that mimic natural systems in productivity and functionality. This workshop will build the foundation for participants to ask the question: how can a forest be a productive part of a sustainable farm or, alternatively, how can a productive farm be a forest?

The Sustainable Community:

Perhaps better titled “The Community Sustained”, this workshop topic will devote time to the work of developing the skills necessary to create and participate in a sustainable community. During this workshop participants will be living communally in satellite housing. Participants will work together to prepare meals using food grown on the farm and will take turns caring for the community kitchen – for some students this will be their first experience helping prepare meals from ‘scratch.’ Participants will keep weekly journals reflecting on assigned readings about sustainable communities as well as documenting their own experiences living in and working as part of an intentional community.

Participation limited to 15.

Apply


Scientific Diving


August 28 - September 9, 2012
Credits: 0

APPLICATION DEADLINE EXTENDED UNTIL JUNE 1st

Pema Kitaeff, Instructor

This non-credit short course begins with a standard check-out dive and includes all the components required to acheieve current scientific diving status with AAUS (the American Academy of Underwater Scientists, see www.aaus.org for more information) and the University of Washington.
The short intensive course will include First Aid/CPR and Oxygen for SCUBA emergencies certifications and a full SCUBA rescue course resulting in PADI certification. Other topics that will be covered in either lecture, lab, or class-discussion format are local subtidal animal and algae identification, SCUBA accident management, small-boat handling, and commonly-used methods for gathering biological data underwater.


$2100 total cost to cover the course fee plus room & board.

Following admission to the course, students must pay a $500 non-refundable deposit on or before Monday, August 6.

You may either call Stacy Markman (206-616-0753) with your payment by Visa or Mastercard credit card or mail a check, made payable to University of Washington, to:
Friday Harbor Labs
620 University Rd.
Friday Harbor, WA 98250
Attn: Stacy Markman

The remaining amount will be due upon arrival at Friday Harbor Labs.

Enrollment is limited to 9 students.

Photo by Kevin Turner

To apply, students must:

  1. Read carefully through the information about the Scientific Diving Course before completing the application;
  2. Complete the general Friday Harbor Labs' on-line application form (Scientific Diving is listed in the drop-down menu under "Post-Summer");
  3. Download and complete the Scientific Diving Application Addendum and submit via email to Pema Kitaeff (pema at uw.edu) as a PDF file.

For additional information about the Scientific Diving course, please contact Pema Kitaeff

Application deadline: June 1st


Independent Study for UW Graduate Students

During all quarters, graduate students may register for research with the consent of their faculty advisors.

600 Independent Study or Research
700 Master's Thesis
800 Doctoral Dissertation