Skip to Content
Skip to Navigation

Health Promotion

CALL for ART at HALL HEALTH

Top three student works will receive a $100 prize!

UW students and faculty submit up to 2 digital submissions to be considered for an exhibit in Hall Health to promote physical and mental well-being.

Any medium will be considered.

Submit artwork images by June 13, 2014 to hhpccweb@uw.edu

Learn about our May 6, 2014 artwalk here.


Here are some common questions college students have about diet, nutrition, and metabolism:healthy-foods-jpg-11.jpg

  • “Are you concerned about the “Freshman 15”?
  • “Do you power through the day with caffeine and sugar only to crash in the afternoon?”
  • “Do you constantly go on different diets and wonder why they never work?”
  • “Do you wonder which information to trust on the internet about food and nutrition?”
  • “Are you confused with all the different messages on the media about diets and nutrition?”
  • “Would you like to learn how to eat to support your metabolism and have optimal energy throughout the day?”

Come join us for a free workshop with UW graduate and Registered Dietitian Mya Kwon to learn about some things you might have not known about nutrition and metabolism, and how to sort through the web of information and misinformation when it comes to food, diets, and nutrition in the media.

When: 4:30pm, Thursday April 24

Where: Hall Health Center

To RSVP, please contact Mark Shaw, Director of Health Promotion 

** Healthy refreshments and gift cards will be provided to participants. 


insurance.jpg

What is the Affordable Care Act?

The Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare or the ACA, is a law intended to reform the health care system and make health insurance more affordable.  The law has gone into effect in stages.  For example, a provision that requires insurance to fully cover preventive services (like cancer screenings) was implemented in 2010, while the part of the law that stops insurance companies from denying people health insurance because of pre-existing conditions takes effect in 2014.

If you already have health insurance

Say you've already got health insurance.  How does Affordable Care Act affect you?  Well, there are a couple of ways:

  • If you're insured through a parent, you are eligible to continue to receive that coverage up until you're 26 years old.  That means that you've got more time to figure out the other Affordable Care Act provisions before you need to start arranging for your own coverage.
  • Your insurance now covers the full cost of some services that are meant to prevent illness, including birth control, regardless of whether your plan includes a deductible, co-insurance or co-pays.  These services include things like immunizations (like that pesky measles vaccine you have to get in order to attend college!), pap smears and birth control.  Even if your insurance has a deductible, or an amount that you have to pay out-of-pocket before your coverage kicks in, you won't be charged for these services.  Same thing goes for co-insurance (the percent of a service or visit that your insurance company normally makes you pay for) and co-pays (the amount you pay at your doctor's front desk or when you pick up a medication at the pharmacy).
  • If you're a graduate teaching assistant (TA) or research assistant (RA), and have the Graduate Appointee Insurance Plan (GAIP), expect expanded coverage for preventive care.  Otherwise, your benefits should remain mostly unchanged.

If you already have health insurance, you don't need to do anything new or different, unless your insurance company says so.  Be sure to read about the preventive services that are now fully covered by your plan, regardless of whether you have a deductible, co-insurance or co-pays. 

If you purchase student health insurance through UW

If you buy the Student Health Insurance Plan (SHIP) through the University of Washington, you should expect to find very little changed.  However, SHIP is subject to the same requirements as other health insurance policies, and therefore now fully covers preventive services like birth control and immunizations.  You can read about your benefits under SHIP here.

Please note that SHIP will no longer be offered starting Fall Quarter of 2015. Click here for more information.

If you don't have health insurance

Starting January 1, 2014, the Affordable Care Act will require everyone to purchase a health insurance plan, just like the government requires people who own a car to buy car insurance.  Fortunately, if you're a typical college student without much income, there are subsidies available to lower the cost of private insurance.  If you are low-income, you might be eligible for public insurance, also known as Medicaid, for which you would not need to pay.

Please note that under Medicaid (aka Washington Apple Health), mental health services can only be provided by one of the Regional Support Networks (RSNs). Medicaid does not cover these services at Hall Health Center.

In order to obtain coverage for services received at Hall Health Center and other parts of UW Medicine, you must have an insurance plan through one of the following companies:

  • BridgeSpan
  • Regence Blue Shield
  • Molina Healthcare

Eligibility information for Washington residents

If you are an uninsured resident of Washington State, you may have two options:

Curious as to how much you might be looking at paying for your health insurance?  Here's a special calculator that estimates your monthly payment for health insurance (though keep in mind that you might be eligible for Medicaid if you earn less than 138% of the Federal Poverty Level).

Eligibility information for residents of other states

Depending on where you're from, your home state may or may not have its own health insurance exchange (a website set up to facilitate finding and purchasing a health insurance plan).  You can use the federal government's Health Insurance Marketplace to get routed to your state's exchange.  If your state does not operate an exchange, you can use the federal government's version to buy your plan.

Similarly, your state may not have opted to expand Medicaid eligibility.  Read more here about the Medicaid expansion.

International students

If you are a citizen of another country attending the University of Washington, you are required to enroll in the Student Health Insurance Plan (SHIP). You can read about your benefits here.

Other provisions of the Affordable Care Act

There are other elements of the Affordable Care Act that may affect you:

  • Starting in 2014, insurance companies can no longer reject you or charge you more because you have a medical condition
  • If you don't have health insurance at the end of 2014, you may have to pay a penalty (probably less than $100).  Take a look at this graphic to find out if the penalty could apply to you.

Additional resources

Online

Get help enrolling through a Patient Navigator (a health insurance expert).

Read about insurance and Hall Health.

Check out this cartoon-style infographic on what the Affordable Care Act means for young people.

The federal government's HealthCare.gov website offers lots of resources to help you make sense of the Affordable Care Act.

Washington State's Health Plan Finder is where you'll purchase health insurance if you need to buy an individual (i.e., not employer- or parent-sponsored) plan and are a Washington resident.

If you're not a Washington State resident, the federal government's Health Insurance Marketplace can help you purchase a plan.

 

Authored by: Hall Health Center Health Promotion staff

Reviewed by: Hall Health Center Administration staff, January 2014


Colin Maloney_StaffPhoto.jpg

Welcome to the Tobacco Talk blog! 

Here you'll find useful insights about stopping smoking from the coordinator of UW's tobacco cessation program, Colin Maloney.  Contact Colin to learn more about the program at (206) 685-7848 or quittalk@uw.edu


How can I help a friend whose alcohol use may be harming them?

The most obvious signs that a friend has a drinking problem include:


Tobacco Cessation Program Coordinator

Before coming to the University of Washington, Colin worked with homeless youth, in HIV and Hepatitis C prevention, and for the Washington State Tobacco Quitline. Colin has a degree in Community Health Education and Political Science from Portland State University and is currently enrolled in the Community-Oriented Public Health Practice MPH program at University of Washington. In addition to pursuing the Masters in Public Health, Colin is also part of the University’s Tobacco Scholars Program. Colin is primarily motivated by an interest in the social determinants of health, health equity, and access issues.

Outside of work and school, Colin is engaged with a number of social justice oriented civic organizations. In more dedicated off time, Colin enjoys reading, cycling, and spending time with their cat.
 


The Wellness Wheel is a representation of a person's overall health using spokes to convey a number of important aspects of wellness.  Individuals can use these aspects and their extensions to help evaluate and improve their overall health and wellness.

The Wellness Wheel used by Peer Health Educators at the University of Washington encompasses the five important categories of social, mental, physical, cultural, and spiritual health.  These categories often overlap with one another, but can also be seen as exclusive in the overall picture of wellness. 


When you have sleep apnea, your breathing pauses while you sleep. This can happen many times each night. These pauses last 10-20 seconds. It is estimated that 12 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea.

There are two types of sleep apnea:sleep apnea.jpg


male student sleepingOne of the most frequent problems experienced by college students is fatigue.  Students have a busy and demanding lifestyle that often leaves precious few hours for rest.  One essential tool for combating fatigue is an adequate amount of restful sleep.  While this may vary with different individuals, a minimum of 7 hours can be a good starting point.


Syndicate content