The Department of History

News Spotlight

The department is pleased to announce that Professor Linda Nash recently received a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities for research on her new project, "American Engineers and Hydroelectric Development Projects in the US and Afghanistan." With the help of this funding, Nash seeks to examine how Americans’ approach to postwar development was shaped by the nation’s abundant resources and its history of settler colonialism in the American West.

More details are available at the Simpson Center.

Congratulations Linda!

 

Featured Story

Traditionally many undergraduate majors in history have chosen to go on to law school. The academic skills learned in studying history—research, logical argument, evidence-based analysis and persuasive communication—translate well to careers in law, politics and public administration. For UW alum and longtime lawyer Robin Lindley, however, history has always been more than a powerful intellectual toolkit—it has been a motivating passion at every stage in his life. 

Faculty Book Corner

In Motherless Tongues, Vicente L. Rafael examines the vexed relationship between language and history gleaned from the workings of translation in the Philippines, the United States, and beyond. Moving across a range of colonial and postcolonial settings, he demonstrates translation's agency in the making and understanding of events. These include nationalist efforts to vernacularize politics, U.S. projects to weaponize languages in wartime, and autobiographical attempts by area studies scholars to translate the otherness of their lives amid the Cold War. In all cases, translation is at war with itself, generating divergent effects. Over the course of this journey, Rafael delineates the untranslatable that inheres in every act of translation, asking about the politics and ethics of uneven linguistic and semiotic exchanges.