The Department of History

News Spotlight

The department is happy to report that the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) has awarded a collaborative research grant to Professor Adam Warren. Warren is joined on the project by Martha Few of Penn State and Zeb Tortorici of NYU. Their project is entitled "Postmortem Cesarean Operations and the Spread of Fetal Baptism in the Spanish and Portuguese Empires."

More details can be found at the Simpson Center for the Humanities

Well done Adam!

 

Featured Story

We recently caught up with department alum Michael Kendrick. Kendrick graduated from UW with a BA in history in 1996, and now teaches Social Studies at Meadowdale Middle School in Lynnwood. Thanks for taking the time to answer a few questions Michael!

At what point did you decide to become a teacher? 

From a very early age, I was inspired to become a teacher because of one of my greatest influences: my father. He was a middle school science teacher in the Shoreline school district. He would often come home and share funny stories that made me think about the possibility of teaching. I saw the difference he was making in the lives of students and in the community, and I felt like it was something that I, too, was destined to do. 

Faculty Book Corner

Serious and silly, unifying and polarizing, presidential elections have become events that Americans love and hate. Today's elections cost billions of dollars and consume the nation's attention for months, filling television airwaves and online media with endless advertising and political punditry, often heated, vitriolic, and petty. Yet presidential elections also provoke and inspire mass engagement of ordinary citizens in the political system. No matter how frustrated or disinterested voters might be about politics and government, every four years, on the first Tuesday in November, the attention of the nation—and the world—focuses on the candidates, the contest, and the issues. The partisan election process has been a way for a messy, jumbled, raucous nation to come together as a slightly-more-perfect union.