The Department of History

NEWS

The Department of History is pleased to announce three new faculty members for the 2015-2016 academic year. Please join us in welcoming these three distinguished scholars to the department!


Josh Reid will take up the position of associate professor of Native American history of the Pacific Northwest. Born and raised in Washington State, Reid is currently assistant professor of history at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. He also directs the university’s program in Native American and indigenous studies. His first monograph, The Sea Is My Country: The Maritime World of the Makahs, will be released this spring. He currently sits on the editorial advisory board of Pacific Northwest Quarterly and on the American Historical Association Council.

 

 


Matthew Mosca has accepted the position of assistant professor specializing in the history of Imperial China. Matthew Mosca is currently assistant professor of Chinese history at the College of William & Mary. He previously held research fellowships at the University of California, Berkeley, the University of Hong Kong, and the Institute for Advanced Study. His first book, From Frontier Policy to Foreign Policy: The Question of India and the Transformation of Geopolitics in Qing China, was published in 2013.

 

 

STORIES

Today, Christine R. Charbonneau (B.A., 1982) is the CEO of Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest, but she started out as a volunteer while studying History at the University of Washington. Planned Parenthood, whose reproductive health mission includes health services, education, and advocacy, is one of the twenty largest not-for-profit organizations in Washington State. Ms. Charbonneau has 500 employees. Looking back, Charbonneau considers her history courses, many of which included learning about social movements, to have been “excellent preparation for the work of leading a social movement.”

As CEO, Charbonneau is responsible for building a shared vision of her organization’s mission and articulating that vision to potential partners. She explains “much of my time… is spent story-telling… creating a picture of a world that would work so well we would all want to live in it, and giving people a chance to give their money to make it a reality.” She credits the skills she built as a History major for much of her success in her current position.

“Working to get my degree in History, I learned to research, write more concisely, argue an intellectual point, assess issues from various angles in various contexts, and organize my thinking into stories evocative of a time and place and set of facts.”

“My greatest strength, especially early in my career, was that I was a skilled generalist. I have been grateful for my education in History every day, which honed those generalist skills. Not only can I occasionally pull some salient fact out of deep memory, but being able to argue persuasively for my cause has been vital for inspiring staff and supporters. Envisioning, then being able to convey exciting ideas and goals and motivate people to work together over three states (and three time zones) and on nationwide projects has made my organization stronger.”

NEW BOOKS

In the late 1960s and early 1970s hundreds of thousands of white middle-class American youths suddenly became hippies. This short overview of the hippie social movement in the United States examines the movement's beliefs and practices, including psychedelic drugs, casual sex, and rock music, as well as the phenomena of spiritual seeking, hostility to politics, and communes. W. J. Rorabaugh synthesizes how hippies strived for authenticity, expressed individualism, and yearned for community. Viewing the tumultuous Sixties from a new angle, Rorabaugh shows how the counterculture led to subsequent social and cultural changes in the United States with legacies including casual sex, natural foods, and even the personal computer.