The Department of History

News Spotlight

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Turning from the 2015 Lecture Series’ focus on the First World War, the 2016 History Lecture Series looked to the University’s immediate environs: Seattle. Drs. John Findlay, Quintard Taylor, Linda Nash, and James Gregory examined Seattle’s history through the lens of political, environmental, demographic, and radical history. Ranging from an introduction to the origins of Seattle’s founders to an examination of Seattle’s incredible growth, from its relatively homogenous early years to its increasingly diverse modern makeup, “Excavating Seattle’s Histories: People, Politics, Place” offered new perspectives on Seattle’s history. The Series challenged assumptions on what makes Seattle the city it is today and pointed to the many different possible futures. To watch videos of this year’s lectures, follow the link: History Lecture Series 2016.

Featured Story

Quintard Taylor, Emeritus Professor of American History, was recently featured in an article on KPLU. Professor Taylor, who recently gave a lecture entitled “The Peopling of Seattle: Race, Migration, and Immigration” for the History Lecture Series “Excavating Seattle’s Histories,” specializes in African American History. KPLU’s article highlights Professor Taylor’s website BlackPast.org, which has become one of the leading internet resources on African American History. To read the article, follow the link KPLU BlackPast Article. To view a video of Professor Taylor’s lecture on Seattle History, please follow the link History Lecture Series.

Faculty Book Corner

For the Makahs, a tribal nation at the most northwestern point of the contiguous United States, a deep relationship with the sea is the locus of personal and group identity. Unlike most other indigenous tribes whose lives are tied to lands, the Makah people have long placed marine space at the center of their culture, finding in their own waters the physical and spiritual resources to support themselves. This book is the first to explore the history and identity of the Makahs from the arrival of maritime fur-traders in the eighteenth century through the intervening centuries and to the present day.