The Department of History

News Spotlight

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Turning from the 2015 Lecture Series’ focus on the First World War, the 2016 History Lecture Series looked to the University’s immediate environs: Seattle. Drs. John Findlay, Quintard Taylor, Linda Nash, and James Gregory examined Seattle’s history through the lens of political, environmental, demographic, and radical history. Ranging from an introduction to the origins of Seattle’s founders to an examination of Seattle’s incredible growth, from its relatively homogenous early years to its increasingly diverse modern makeup, “Excavating Seattle’s Histories: People, Politics, Place” offered new perspectives on Seattle’s history. The Series challenged assumptions on what makes Seattle the city it is today and pointed to the many different possible futures. To watch videos of this year’s lectures, follow the link: History Lecture Series 2016.

Featured Story

If asked the question “what can you do with a Bachelor’s Degree in History?” history majors will provide many different answers. Recent graduate Josie Rollins’ response to this question was to go to graduate school. A former recipient of the Department of History’s Sleizer Scholarship and the Magna Carta Society Prize, Josie has decided to take what she learned at the UW and pursue an advanced degree. Now at Cambridge University in England, Josie is pursuing first an M.Phil, the British equivalent of an M.A., and then a Ph.D. While at the UW, Josie took as many history classes as she could, but found herself increasingly drawn to medieval history. Her favorite courses at the UW were Professor Charity Urbanski’s Medieval England class and Professor Robin Stacey’s Reacting to the Past. When asked why these classes were her favorites, Josie said “they challenged me to examine my assumptions about medieval history and see how many gaps there are in our knowledge about the period.

Faculty Book Corner

For the Makahs, a tribal nation at the most northwestern point of the contiguous United States, a deep relationship with the sea is the locus of personal and group identity. Unlike most other indigenous tribes whose lives are tied to lands, the Makah people have long placed marine space at the center of their culture, finding in their own waters the physical and spiritual resources to support themselves. This book is the first to explore the history and identity of the Makahs from the arrival of maritime fur-traders in the eighteenth century through the intervening centuries and to the present day.