Clinical Trials and Studies

The University of Washington’s Memory and Brain Wellness Center/Alzheimer's Disease Research Center serves as a site for observational studies and trials of potential treatments, prevention strategies, and new diagnostic approaches for Alzheimer’s disease and related neurodegenerative conditions, such as frontotemporal degeneration and Lewy Body dementia/Parkinson's disease dementia, open for enrollment at UW Medicine. This page provides information about these studies and how you can learn more or participate. New studies appear over time, and these may involve other groups of patients. We think of study participants as our partners in the effort to find a prevention for neurological conditions that lead to dementia.

Clinical trials provide a controlled and monitored environment where volunteer research participants can safely take experimental medication. The trials at our center are placebo-controlled, double-blind studies, meaning that there is a chance that participants will be on the experimental medication or on a placebo (a substance that looks the same but contains no medication).

For expanded information about participating in Alzheimer disease research studies at the UW, please visit Participating in Research

Guide to Clinical Trials and Studies at the UW

You may be eligible if you have:

Aging with Pride: IDEA (Innovations in Dementia Empowerment and Action for LGBTQ people)

Aging with Pride: IDEA (Innovations in Dementia Empowerment and Action) is an exercise and problem-solving program for older adults with memory loss and the people who help them. 

The study is the first federally-funded project testing a program designed to improve quality of life for LGBTQ people who experience memory loss or who help those experiencing memory loss. Participants are compensated for their time.

The study takes place in the Seattle, San Francisco, and Los Angeles metropolitan areas. Older adults with memory loss can participate with an informal care partner, who may be a spouse or partner, friend, family member, or anyone who assists them. Either the person with memory loss or the person who helps them (or both) must be LGBTQ. Participants meet with a coach to learn exercises and strategies related to memory loss. The program includes 9 in-person sessions with the coach over 6 weeks, with follow-up phone calls. 

IDEA is led by University of Washington School of Social Work professor Karen Fredriksen Goldsen and UW Nursing professor Linda Teri. Dr. Fredriksen Goldsen is the primary investigator for Aging with Pride: National Health, Aging, and Sexuality/Gender Study (NHAS), the first national longitudinal study of health and well-being in LGBTQ older adults, and Dr. Teri pioneered the RDAD (Reducing Disabilities in Alzheimer’s Disease) program, which has been shown to improve quality of life for people with memory loss and reduce rates of institutionalization.

Contact: 

Phone: 1-888-655-6646

Email: ageIDEA@uw.edu


Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Study NIA- LOAD

We are studying families with histories of dementia to understand the genetic components behind Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements: 

-Have living family member(s) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you 

-Are willing to be contacted every  1-2 years to complete memory testing and an interview, both of which can be completed over the phone

 

Contact

For more information, please contact the Research Coordinator at 206.277.1024

 

Study Leader

Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Adjunct Professor, Epidemiology
Director, GRECC, VISN-20 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center
Psychiatrist, Clinical Core,  ADRC

For More Information

Technology for Early Dementia Diagnosis

Researchers at the VA Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Centers are studying wearable technologies that may be useful to help diagnose Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

ELIGIBILITY

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements:

-Have a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or probable dementia with Lewy Bodies

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you

-Have at least 8 years of education

 

COMPENSATION

Volunteers who complete this study will receive up to $250 in appreciation for their time and participation.

 

CONTACT

Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

Study PI: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW


Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Study NIA- LOAD

We are studying families with histories of dementia to understand the genetic components behind Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements: 

-Have living family member(s) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you 

-Are willing to be contacted every  1-2 years to complete memory testing and an interview, both of which can be completed over the phone

 

Contact

For more information, please contact the Research Coordinator at 206.277.1024

 

Study Leader

Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Adjunct Professor, Epidemiology
Director, GRECC, VISN-20 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center
Psychiatrist, Clinical Core,  ADRC

For More Information

Technology for Early Dementia Diagnosis

Researchers at the VA Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Centers are studying wearable technologies that may be useful to help diagnose Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

ELIGIBILITY

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements:

-Have a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or probable dementia with Lewy Bodies

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you

-Have at least 8 years of education

 

COMPENSATION

Volunteers who complete this study will receive up to $250 in appreciation for their time and participation.

 

CONTACT

Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

Study PI: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW


ADRC Clinical Core

Who we are

The UW Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) is part of a nationwide network of research centers funded by the National Institute on Aging to learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.  We are exploring innovative approaches to diagnosis, treatment, and disease prevention by partnering with people who have normal memory and thinking and those who have memory concerns or are living with dementia.  

In order to learn more about diseases that cause memory loss and dementia, we are looking for volunteers from a variety of ethnic backgrounds and ages who are willing to participate in research.  It is important to study a diverse group of people so that the information we learn will benefit everyone.

 

Who we are seeking

The UW ADRC is interested in partnering with:

-People from underrepresented groups, such as African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians and Alaskan Natives.  

-People diagnosed with memory and thinking (cognitive) changes by their medical provider, especially a diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment

-We are also interested in partnering with people from any ethnic background who are 85 years or older and who do not have concerns about their memory or thinking. 

 

What to expect at a UW ADRC research visit

This study involves a yearly visit during which volunteers complete tests of their memory and thinking, have a brief physical and neurological examination, and answer questions about their medical history, memory, mood, and ability to perform daily activities. Volunteers must also have a study partner who knows them well and would notice changes in their memory, mood or ability to perform daily activities.  

We may also ask some volunteers for a blood or cerebral spinal fluid sample in order to learn more about how our bodies change in response to normal aging and dementia.

To learn more about participating, contact: UW ADRC at 206-744-0588,  uwadrc@uw.edu

For More Information

Aging with Pride: IDEA (Innovations in Dementia Empowerment and Action for LGBTQ people)

Aging with Pride: IDEA (Innovations in Dementia Empowerment and Action) is an exercise and problem-solving program for older adults with memory loss and the people who help them. 

The study is the first federally-funded project testing a program designed to improve quality of life for LGBTQ people who experience memory loss or who help those experiencing memory loss. Participants are compensated for their time.

The study takes place in the Seattle, San Francisco, and Los Angeles metropolitan areas. Older adults with memory loss can participate with an informal care partner, who may be a spouse or partner, friend, family member, or anyone who assists them. Either the person with memory loss or the person who helps them (or both) must be LGBTQ. Participants meet with a coach to learn exercises and strategies related to memory loss. The program includes 9 in-person sessions with the coach over 6 weeks, with follow-up phone calls. 

IDEA is led by University of Washington School of Social Work professor Karen Fredriksen Goldsen and UW Nursing professor Linda Teri. Dr. Fredriksen Goldsen is the primary investigator for Aging with Pride: National Health, Aging, and Sexuality/Gender Study (NHAS), the first national longitudinal study of health and well-being in LGBTQ older adults, and Dr. Teri pioneered the RDAD (Reducing Disabilities in Alzheimer’s Disease) program, which has been shown to improve quality of life for people with memory loss and reduce rates of institutionalization.

Contact: 

Phone: 1-888-655-6646

Email: ageIDEA@uw.edu


Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Study NIA- LOAD

We are studying families with histories of dementia to understand the genetic components behind Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements: 

-Have living family member(s) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you 

-Are willing to be contacted every  1-2 years to complete memory testing and an interview, both of which can be completed over the phone

 

Contact

For more information, please contact the Research Coordinator at 206.277.1024

 

Study Leader

Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Adjunct Professor, Epidemiology
Director, GRECC, VISN-20 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center
Psychiatrist, Clinical Core,  ADRC

For More Information

MIND: Memory Improvement Through Nicotine Dosing

MIND: A National Research Treatment Study for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): Memory Improvement Through Nicotine Dosing

The purpose of this study is to determine whether daily transdermal nicotine (patch) will have a positive effect on early memory impairment in participants diagnosed with MCI.  This study, which will take place at multiple sites across the U.S., will consist of 12 visits over a 2-year period. 

 

Details:

Healthy, non-smoking adults, ages 55+, who either notice changes in their memory or whose family members notice memory changes may be eligible to participate.  The purpose of this study is to determine whether nicotine (in patch form) improves memory and functioning in adults diagnosed with MCI. Participants  will have extensive memory & cognitive testing as part of the screening process. Those who meet the study qualifications will be placed on either daily nicotine or placebo (inactive ingredient) patches. Some study sites will additionally conduct an MRI (brain scan) in addition to the regular study procedures.

Participants are required to have a study partner who will accompany them to each appointment.  This partner may be a family member, close friend, or caregiver.  This person must be someone that knows the participant well and spends a minimum of 10 hours a week with them.  This is necessary in order for the partner to give the research staff feedback on the participant’s memory, health, & functioning throughout the study.

Learn More: MIND Study Website and Frequently Asked Questions

 

Study Coordinator: Yeung Tutterrow  |  Email: ylt2@uw.edu 

Study Principle Investigator: Dr. Michael Persenaire, MD

For More Information

ADRC Clinical Core

Who we are

The UW Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) is part of a nationwide network of research centers funded by the National Institute on Aging to learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.  We are exploring innovative approaches to diagnosis, treatment, and disease prevention by partnering with people who have normal memory and thinking and those who have memory concerns or are living with dementia.  

In order to learn more about diseases that cause memory loss and dementia, we are looking for volunteers from a variety of ethnic backgrounds and ages who are willing to participate in research.  It is important to study a diverse group of people so that the information we learn will benefit everyone.

 

Who we are seeking

The UW ADRC is interested in partnering with:

-People from underrepresented groups, such as African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians and Alaskan Natives.  

-People diagnosed with memory and thinking (cognitive) changes by their medical provider, especially a diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment

-We are also interested in partnering with people from any ethnic background who are 85 years or older and who do not have concerns about their memory or thinking. 

 

What to expect at a UW ADRC research visit

This study involves a yearly visit during which volunteers complete tests of their memory and thinking, have a brief physical and neurological examination, and answer questions about their medical history, memory, mood, and ability to perform daily activities. Volunteers must also have a study partner who knows them well and would notice changes in their memory, mood or ability to perform daily activities.  

We may also ask some volunteers for a blood or cerebral spinal fluid sample in order to learn more about how our bodies change in response to normal aging and dementia.

To learn more about participating, contact: UW ADRC at 206-744-0588,  uwadrc@uw.edu

For More Information

Brain Inflammation and Glucose Regulation Study

In research done in animals, scientists have discovered that certain diets, especially those high in fat, cause not only weight gain but changes in the brain. These changes occur in the area of the brain that regulates body weight and fat stores as well as glucose levels. This region is called the hypothalamus.

The purpose of the study is to learn more about the differences in human brain structure in people with and without diabetes and if these differences affect regulation of blood sugar over time. Participants will be asked to complete study visits at the University of Washington Medical Center.

 

PARTICIPANT ELIGIBILITY

  • Age 25-60
  • Currently Overweight or Obese
  • Diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes
  • Available to come to UW Medical Center and UW South Lake Union 2-3 Times
  • Not Taking Insulin
  • Non-Smoker
  • No History of Bariatric Surgery

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

Phone: (206) 616-6360

Email: bigr@uw.edu

 

ADDITIONAL STUDY DETAILS

Full Study Title
Brain Inflammation and Glucose Regulation

Investigator
Ellen Schur, MD, MS

Accepts Healthy Volunteers?
Yes

Study Sites

1959 NE Pacific St
Seattle, Washington 98195
United States

750 Republican St
Seattle, Washington 98109
United States


Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Study NIA- LOAD

We are studying families with histories of dementia to understand the genetic components behind Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements: 

-Have living family member(s) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you 

-Are willing to be contacted every  1-2 years to complete memory testing and an interview, both of which can be completed over the phone

 

Contact

For more information, please contact the Research Coordinator at 206.277.1024

 

Study Leader

Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Adjunct Professor, Epidemiology
Director, GRECC, VISN-20 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center
Psychiatrist, Clinical Core,  ADRC

For More Information

Meal and Memory Study

APOE genotype and diet influences on Alzheimer's biomarkers

We are learning more and more about the risks for Alzheimer's disease every year, and that includes learning what foods are best at promoting brain health. It might be more complicated than 'this food is good or bad.' Dr. Angela Hanson, a geriatric physician at the University of Washington, is conducting a study that examines how a risk gene for Alzheimer's disease might affect people's memory and metabolic responses to different meals. Her preliminary work showed that people who carry the gene APOE4 (E4) responded differently to different Alzheimer's treatments and diets, compared to people who did not carry this gene. Dr. Hanson plans to study this further with the “Meal and Memory Study” in adults age 55 and older who do not have dementia. 

 

Eligibility: Participants may be men or women, ages 55 and older. People who have known dementia, or known diabetes, are not eligible.

 

Key researcher:  Angela Hanson, MD

Study Contact: Angela Hanson at 206-897-5393 or hansonaj@uw.edu

For More Information

PoND: Prazosin and CSF Biomarkers in Aging, MCI and AD

We are seeking healthy, medically stable volunteers over the age of 45 who do not have memory problems for a new approach to preventing Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

Details

  • The study includes an assessment of your physical and mental health.
  • You will receive prazosin (a pill used for posttraumatic stress disorder and high blood pressure).
  • The study will take about 14 hours, spread over roughly 9 visits during a 3-month period.
  • These visits will be at the Seattle VA.
  • You will be compensated for each of your visits, with the total compensation for the study amounting to $750 to $825.

Key Researcher: The PI of this study is Murray Raskind at S-116-MIRECC, 1660 S. Columbian Way, Seattle, WA  98108.

Study Contact: 206.277.1491 or 1.800.329.8387 ext. 1491 

For More Information

ADRC Clinical Core

Who we are

The UW Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) is part of a nationwide network of research centers funded by the National Institute on Aging to learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.  We are exploring innovative approaches to diagnosis, treatment, and disease prevention by partnering with people who have normal memory and thinking and those who have memory concerns or are living with dementia.  

In order to learn more about diseases that cause memory loss and dementia, we are looking for volunteers from a variety of ethnic backgrounds and ages who are willing to participate in research.  It is important to study a diverse group of people so that the information we learn will benefit everyone.

 

Who we are seeking

The UW ADRC is interested in partnering with:

-People from underrepresented groups, such as African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians and Alaskan Natives.  

-People diagnosed with memory and thinking (cognitive) changes by their medical provider, especially a diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment

-We are also interested in partnering with people from any ethnic background who are 85 years or older and who do not have concerns about their memory or thinking. 

 

What to expect at a UW ADRC research visit

This study involves a yearly visit during which volunteers complete tests of their memory and thinking, have a brief physical and neurological examination, and answer questions about their medical history, memory, mood, and ability to perform daily activities. Volunteers must also have a study partner who knows them well and would notice changes in their memory, mood or ability to perform daily activities.  

We may also ask some volunteers for a blood or cerebral spinal fluid sample in order to learn more about how our bodies change in response to normal aging and dementia.

To learn more about participating, contact: UW ADRC at 206-744-0588,  uwadrc@uw.edu

For More Information

Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Study NIA- LOAD

We are studying families with histories of dementia to understand the genetic components behind Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements: 

-Have living family member(s) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you 

-Are willing to be contacted every  1-2 years to complete memory testing and an interview, both of which can be completed over the phone

 

Contact

For more information, please contact the Research Coordinator at 206.277.1024

 

Study Leader

Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Adjunct Professor, Epidemiology
Director, GRECC, VISN-20 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center
Psychiatrist, Clinical Core,  ADRC

For More Information

Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Study NIA- LOAD

We are studying families with histories of dementia to understand the genetic components behind Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements: 

-Have living family member(s) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you 

-Are willing to be contacted every  1-2 years to complete memory testing and an interview, both of which can be completed over the phone

 

Contact

For more information, please contact the Research Coordinator at 206.277.1024

 

Study Leader

Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Adjunct Professor, Epidemiology
Director, GRECC, VISN-20 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center
Psychiatrist, Clinical Core,  ADRC

For More Information

Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Study NIA- LOAD

We are studying families with histories of dementia to understand the genetic components behind Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements: 

-Have living family member(s) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you 

-Are willing to be contacted every  1-2 years to complete memory testing and an interview, both of which can be completed over the phone

 

Contact

For more information, please contact the Research Coordinator at 206.277.1024

 

Study Leader

Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Adjunct Professor, Epidemiology
Director, GRECC, VISN-20 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center
Psychiatrist, Clinical Core,  ADRC

For More Information

Technology for Early Dementia Diagnosis

Researchers at the VA Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Centers are studying wearable technologies that may be useful to help diagnose Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

ELIGIBILITY

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements:

-Have a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or probable dementia with Lewy Bodies

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you

-Have at least 8 years of education

 

COMPENSATION

Volunteers who complete this study will receive up to $250 in appreciation for their time and participation.

 

CONTACT

Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

Study PI: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW


The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The purpose of the Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium is to develop a collection of samples from individuals diagnosed with dementia with lewy bodies (DLB), dementia with lewy bodies/mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or Parkinson's disease dementia who will be followed over time. The consortium will collect detailed clinical information, biospecimens, and imaging data. Led by top leaders in the field, this consortium will fill the gap in resources available for biomarker development in Lewy Body Dementia and promote additional future research by having a readily available subject sample. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you:

-Have a diagnosis of probable dementia with lewy body/MCI or Parkinson's disease dementia

-Have a study partner who is able and willing to comply with required study procedures

-Have at least eight years of education

The study doctor will also check for other medical conditions or reasons that might prevent you from participating in the study

 

Study Leader: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW

Seattle Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

For More Information

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The purpose of the Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium is to develop a collection of samples from individuals diagnosed with dementia with lewy bodies (DLB), dementia with lewy bodies/mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or Parkinson's disease dementia who will be followed over time. The consortium will collect detailed clinical information, biospecimens, and imaging data. Led by top leaders in the field, this consortium will fill the gap in resources available for biomarker development in Lewy Body Dementia and promote additional future research by having a readily available subject sample. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you:

-Have a diagnosis of probable dementia with lewy body/MCI or Parkinson's disease dementia

-Have a study partner who is able and willing to comply with required study procedures

-Have at least eight years of education

The study doctor will also check for other medical conditions or reasons that might prevent you from participating in the study

 

Study Leader: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW

Seattle Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

For More Information

Sort by Study Type

Aging with Pride: IDEA (Innovations in Dementia Empowerment and Action for LGBTQ people)

Aging with Pride: IDEA (Innovations in Dementia Empowerment and Action) is an exercise and problem-solving program for older adults with memory loss and the people who help them. 

The study is the first federally-funded project testing a program designed to improve quality of life for LGBTQ people who experience memory loss or who help those experiencing memory loss. Participants are compensated for their time.

The study takes place in the Seattle, San Francisco, and Los Angeles metropolitan areas. Older adults with memory loss can participate with an informal care partner, who may be a spouse or partner, friend, family member, or anyone who assists them. Either the person with memory loss or the person who helps them (or both) must be LGBTQ. Participants meet with a coach to learn exercises and strategies related to memory loss. The program includes 9 in-person sessions with the coach over 6 weeks, with follow-up phone calls. 

IDEA is led by University of Washington School of Social Work professor Karen Fredriksen Goldsen and UW Nursing professor Linda Teri. Dr. Fredriksen Goldsen is the primary investigator for Aging with Pride: National Health, Aging, and Sexuality/Gender Study (NHAS), the first national longitudinal study of health and well-being in LGBTQ older adults, and Dr. Teri pioneered the RDAD (Reducing Disabilities in Alzheimer’s Disease) program, which has been shown to improve quality of life for people with memory loss and reduce rates of institutionalization.

Contact: 

Phone: 1-888-655-6646

Email: ageIDEA@uw.edu


Brain Inflammation and Glucose Regulation Study

In research done in animals, scientists have discovered that certain diets, especially those high in fat, cause not only weight gain but changes in the brain. These changes occur in the area of the brain that regulates body weight and fat stores as well as glucose levels. This region is called the hypothalamus.

The purpose of the study is to learn more about the differences in human brain structure in people with and without diabetes and if these differences affect regulation of blood sugar over time. Participants will be asked to complete study visits at the University of Washington Medical Center.

 

PARTICIPANT ELIGIBILITY

  • Age 25-60
  • Currently Overweight or Obese
  • Diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes
  • Available to come to UW Medical Center and UW South Lake Union 2-3 Times
  • Not Taking Insulin
  • Non-Smoker
  • No History of Bariatric Surgery

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

Phone: (206) 616-6360

Email: bigr@uw.edu

 

ADDITIONAL STUDY DETAILS

Full Study Title
Brain Inflammation and Glucose Regulation

Investigator
Ellen Schur, MD, MS

Accepts Healthy Volunteers?
Yes

Study Sites

1959 NE Pacific St
Seattle, Washington 98195
United States

750 Republican St
Seattle, Washington 98109
United States


Technology for Early Dementia Diagnosis

Researchers at the VA Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Centers are studying wearable technologies that may be useful to help diagnose Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

ELIGIBILITY

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements:

-Have a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or probable dementia with Lewy Bodies

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you

-Have at least 8 years of education

 

COMPENSATION

Volunteers who complete this study will receive up to $250 in appreciation for their time and participation.

 

CONTACT

Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

Study PI: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW


The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The purpose of the Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium is to develop a collection of samples from individuals diagnosed with dementia with lewy bodies (DLB), dementia with lewy bodies/mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or Parkinson's disease dementia who will be followed over time. The consortium will collect detailed clinical information, biospecimens, and imaging data. Led by top leaders in the field, this consortium will fill the gap in resources available for biomarker development in Lewy Body Dementia and promote additional future research by having a readily available subject sample. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you:

-Have a diagnosis of probable dementia with lewy body/MCI or Parkinson's disease dementia

-Have a study partner who is able and willing to comply with required study procedures

-Have at least eight years of education

The study doctor will also check for other medical conditions or reasons that might prevent you from participating in the study

 

Study Leader: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW

Seattle Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

For More Information

MIND: Memory Improvement Through Nicotine Dosing

MIND: A National Research Treatment Study for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): Memory Improvement Through Nicotine Dosing

The purpose of this study is to determine whether daily transdermal nicotine (patch) will have a positive effect on early memory impairment in participants diagnosed with MCI.  This study, which will take place at multiple sites across the U.S., will consist of 12 visits over a 2-year period. 

 

Details:

Healthy, non-smoking adults, ages 55+, who either notice changes in their memory or whose family members notice memory changes may be eligible to participate.  The purpose of this study is to determine whether nicotine (in patch form) improves memory and functioning in adults diagnosed with MCI. Participants  will have extensive memory & cognitive testing as part of the screening process. Those who meet the study qualifications will be placed on either daily nicotine or placebo (inactive ingredient) patches. Some study sites will additionally conduct an MRI (brain scan) in addition to the regular study procedures.

Participants are required to have a study partner who will accompany them to each appointment.  This partner may be a family member, close friend, or caregiver.  This person must be someone that knows the participant well and spends a minimum of 10 hours a week with them.  This is necessary in order for the partner to give the research staff feedback on the participant’s memory, health, & functioning throughout the study.

Learn More: MIND Study Website and Frequently Asked Questions

 

Study Coordinator: Yeung Tutterrow  |  Email: ylt2@uw.edu 

Study Principle Investigator: Dr. Michael Persenaire, MD

For More Information

PoND: Prazosin and CSF Biomarkers in Aging, MCI and AD

We are seeking healthy, medically stable volunteers over the age of 45 who do not have memory problems for a new approach to preventing Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

Details

  • The study includes an assessment of your physical and mental health.
  • You will receive prazosin (a pill used for posttraumatic stress disorder and high blood pressure).
  • The study will take about 14 hours, spread over roughly 9 visits during a 3-month period.
  • These visits will be at the Seattle VA.
  • You will be compensated for each of your visits, with the total compensation for the study amounting to $750 to $825.

Key Researcher: The PI of this study is Murray Raskind at S-116-MIRECC, 1660 S. Columbian Way, Seattle, WA  98108.

Study Contact: 206.277.1491 or 1.800.329.8387 ext. 1491 

For More Information

Prazosin and CSF Biomarkers in mTBI

Prazosin and CSF Biomarkers in mTBI

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) from explosions is the “signature injury” of Veterans who have deployed to the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Although the immediate effects of a single mTBI usually resolve over days or weeks, multiple mTBIs can lead to both persistent symptoms and, years later, to two fatal progressive brain diseases, chronic traumatic encephalopathy and Alzheimer's disease. It is believed that these diseases are caused by nerve damaging chemicals called tau and beta amyloid produced by the brain but which are not removed from the brain in a normal manner in persons with mTBIs. The investigators will determine in Veterans who experienced mTBIs whether a clinically available drug called prazosin increases removal of tau and beta amyloid from the brain. This will be accomplished by seeing if prazosin reduces the amount of tau and beta amyloid in the spinal fluid that surrounds the brain. If the investigators find such reductions, prazosin will be evaluated as a preventative treatment in future studies. (from Clinical Trials.gov)

 

Key researcher: Murray A Raskind, MD, VA Puget Sound Health Care System Seattle Division, Seattle, WA

Study Contacts: Rebecca C Hendrickson, MD | Rebecca.Hendrickson@va.gov | 206-277-5054

                         Hollie A Holmes | hollie.holmes@va.gov | (206) 277-6207

Trial Description on clinicaltrials.gov

For More Information

MIND: Memory Improvement Through Nicotine Dosing

MIND: A National Research Treatment Study for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): Memory Improvement Through Nicotine Dosing

The purpose of this study is to determine whether daily transdermal nicotine (patch) will have a positive effect on early memory impairment in participants diagnosed with MCI.  This study, which will take place at multiple sites across the U.S., will consist of 12 visits over a 2-year period. 

 

Details:

Healthy, non-smoking adults, ages 55+, who either notice changes in their memory or whose family members notice memory changes may be eligible to participate.  The purpose of this study is to determine whether nicotine (in patch form) improves memory and functioning in adults diagnosed with MCI. Participants  will have extensive memory & cognitive testing as part of the screening process. Those who meet the study qualifications will be placed on either daily nicotine or placebo (inactive ingredient) patches. Some study sites will additionally conduct an MRI (brain scan) in addition to the regular study procedures.

Participants are required to have a study partner who will accompany them to each appointment.  This partner may be a family member, close friend, or caregiver.  This person must be someone that knows the participant well and spends a minimum of 10 hours a week with them.  This is necessary in order for the partner to give the research staff feedback on the participant’s memory, health, & functioning throughout the study.

Learn More: MIND Study Website and Frequently Asked Questions

 

Study Coordinator: Yeung Tutterrow  |  Email: ylt2@uw.edu 

Study Principle Investigator: Dr. Michael Persenaire, MD

For More Information

ADRC Clinical Core

Who we are

The UW Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) is part of a nationwide network of research centers funded by the National Institute on Aging to learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.  We are exploring innovative approaches to diagnosis, treatment, and disease prevention by partnering with people who have normal memory and thinking and those who have memory concerns or are living with dementia.  

In order to learn more about diseases that cause memory loss and dementia, we are looking for volunteers from a variety of ethnic backgrounds and ages who are willing to participate in research.  It is important to study a diverse group of people so that the information we learn will benefit everyone.

 

Who we are seeking

The UW ADRC is interested in partnering with:

-People from underrepresented groups, such as African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians and Alaskan Natives.  

-People diagnosed with memory and thinking (cognitive) changes by their medical provider, especially a diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment

-We are also interested in partnering with people from any ethnic background who are 85 years or older and who do not have concerns about their memory or thinking. 

 

What to expect at a UW ADRC research visit

This study involves a yearly visit during which volunteers complete tests of their memory and thinking, have a brief physical and neurological examination, and answer questions about their medical history, memory, mood, and ability to perform daily activities. Volunteers must also have a study partner who knows them well and would notice changes in their memory, mood or ability to perform daily activities.  

We may also ask some volunteers for a blood or cerebral spinal fluid sample in order to learn more about how our bodies change in response to normal aging and dementia.

To learn more about participating, contact: UW ADRC at 206-744-0588,  uwadrc@uw.edu

For More Information

Brain Inflammation and Glucose Regulation Study

In research done in animals, scientists have discovered that certain diets, especially those high in fat, cause not only weight gain but changes in the brain. These changes occur in the area of the brain that regulates body weight and fat stores as well as glucose levels. This region is called the hypothalamus.

The purpose of the study is to learn more about the differences in human brain structure in people with and without diabetes and if these differences affect regulation of blood sugar over time. Participants will be asked to complete study visits at the University of Washington Medical Center.

 

PARTICIPANT ELIGIBILITY

  • Age 25-60
  • Currently Overweight or Obese
  • Diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes
  • Available to come to UW Medical Center and UW South Lake Union 2-3 Times
  • Not Taking Insulin
  • Non-Smoker
  • No History of Bariatric Surgery

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

Phone: (206) 616-6360

Email: bigr@uw.edu

 

ADDITIONAL STUDY DETAILS

Full Study Title
Brain Inflammation and Glucose Regulation

Investigator
Ellen Schur, MD, MS

Accepts Healthy Volunteers?
Yes

Study Sites

1959 NE Pacific St
Seattle, Washington 98195
United States

750 Republican St
Seattle, Washington 98109
United States


Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Study NIA- LOAD

We are studying families with histories of dementia to understand the genetic components behind Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements: 

-Have living family member(s) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you 

-Are willing to be contacted every  1-2 years to complete memory testing and an interview, both of which can be completed over the phone

 

Contact

For more information, please contact the Research Coordinator at 206.277.1024

 

Study Leader

Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Adjunct Professor, Epidemiology
Director, GRECC, VISN-20 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center
Psychiatrist, Clinical Core,  ADRC

For More Information

Technology for Early Dementia Diagnosis

Researchers at the VA Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Centers are studying wearable technologies that may be useful to help diagnose Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

ELIGIBILITY

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements:

-Have a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or probable dementia with Lewy Bodies

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you

-Have at least 8 years of education

 

COMPENSATION

Volunteers who complete this study will receive up to $250 in appreciation for their time and participation.

 

CONTACT

Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

Study PI: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW


The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The purpose of the Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium is to develop a collection of samples from individuals diagnosed with dementia with lewy bodies (DLB), dementia with lewy bodies/mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or Parkinson's disease dementia who will be followed over time. The consortium will collect detailed clinical information, biospecimens, and imaging data. Led by top leaders in the field, this consortium will fill the gap in resources available for biomarker development in Lewy Body Dementia and promote additional future research by having a readily available subject sample. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you:

-Have a diagnosis of probable dementia with lewy body/MCI or Parkinson's disease dementia

-Have a study partner who is able and willing to comply with required study procedures

-Have at least eight years of education

The study doctor will also check for other medical conditions or reasons that might prevent you from participating in the study

 

Study Leader: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW

Seattle Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

For More Information

All Studies and Trials

ADRC Clinical Core

Who we are

The UW Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) is part of a nationwide network of research centers funded by the National Institute on Aging to learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.  We are exploring innovative approaches to diagnosis, treatment, and disease prevention by partnering with people who have normal memory and thinking and those who have memory concerns or are living with dementia.  

In order to learn more about diseases that cause memory loss and dementia, we are looking for volunteers from a variety of ethnic backgrounds and ages who are willing to participate in research.  It is important to study a diverse group of people so that the information we learn will benefit everyone.

 

Who we are seeking

The UW ADRC is interested in partnering with:

-People from underrepresented groups, such as African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians and Alaskan Natives.  

-People diagnosed with memory and thinking (cognitive) changes by their medical provider, especially a diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment

-We are also interested in partnering with people from any ethnic background who are 85 years or older and who do not have concerns about their memory or thinking. 

 

What to expect at a UW ADRC research visit

This study involves a yearly visit during which volunteers complete tests of their memory and thinking, have a brief physical and neurological examination, and answer questions about their medical history, memory, mood, and ability to perform daily activities. Volunteers must also have a study partner who knows them well and would notice changes in their memory, mood or ability to perform daily activities.  

We may also ask some volunteers for a blood or cerebral spinal fluid sample in order to learn more about how our bodies change in response to normal aging and dementia.

To learn more about participating, contact: UW ADRC at 206-744-0588,  uwadrc@uw.edu

For More Information

Aging with Pride: IDEA (Innovations in Dementia Empowerment and Action for LGBTQ people)

Aging with Pride: IDEA (Innovations in Dementia Empowerment and Action) is an exercise and problem-solving program for older adults with memory loss and the people who help them. 

The study is the first federally-funded project testing a program designed to improve quality of life for LGBTQ people who experience memory loss or who help those experiencing memory loss. Participants are compensated for their time.

The study takes place in the Seattle, San Francisco, and Los Angeles metropolitan areas. Older adults with memory loss can participate with an informal care partner, who may be a spouse or partner, friend, family member, or anyone who assists them. Either the person with memory loss or the person who helps them (or both) must be LGBTQ. Participants meet with a coach to learn exercises and strategies related to memory loss. The program includes 9 in-person sessions with the coach over 6 weeks, with follow-up phone calls. 

IDEA is led by University of Washington School of Social Work professor Karen Fredriksen Goldsen and UW Nursing professor Linda Teri. Dr. Fredriksen Goldsen is the primary investigator for Aging with Pride: National Health, Aging, and Sexuality/Gender Study (NHAS), the first national longitudinal study of health and well-being in LGBTQ older adults, and Dr. Teri pioneered the RDAD (Reducing Disabilities in Alzheimer’s Disease) program, which has been shown to improve quality of life for people with memory loss and reduce rates of institutionalization.

Contact: 

Phone: 1-888-655-6646

Email: ageIDEA@uw.edu

Brain Inflammation and Glucose Regulation Study

In research done in animals, scientists have discovered that certain diets, especially those high in fat, cause not only weight gain but changes in the brain. These changes occur in the area of the brain that regulates body weight and fat stores as well as glucose levels. This region is called the hypothalamus.

The purpose of the study is to learn more about the differences in human brain structure in people with and without diabetes and if these differences affect regulation of blood sugar over time. Participants will be asked to complete study visits at the University of Washington Medical Center.

 

PARTICIPANT ELIGIBILITY

  • Age 25-60
  • Currently Overweight or Obese
  • Diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes
  • Available to come to UW Medical Center and UW South Lake Union 2-3 Times
  • Not Taking Insulin
  • Non-Smoker
  • No History of Bariatric Surgery

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

Phone: (206) 616-6360

Email: bigr@uw.edu

 

ADDITIONAL STUDY DETAILS

Full Study Title
Brain Inflammation and Glucose Regulation

Investigator
Ellen Schur, MD, MS

Accepts Healthy Volunteers?
Yes

Study Sites

1959 NE Pacific St
Seattle, Washington 98195
United States

750 Republican St
Seattle, Washington 98109
United States

Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Study NIA- LOAD

We are studying families with histories of dementia to understand the genetic components behind Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements: 

-Have living family member(s) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you 

-Are willing to be contacted every  1-2 years to complete memory testing and an interview, both of which can be completed over the phone

 

Contact

For more information, please contact the Research Coordinator at 206.277.1024

 

Study Leader

Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Adjunct Professor, Epidemiology
Director, GRECC, VISN-20 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center
Psychiatrist, Clinical Core,  ADRC

For More Information

Meal and Memory Study

APOE genotype and diet influences on Alzheimer's biomarkers

We are learning more and more about the risks for Alzheimer's disease every year, and that includes learning what foods are best at promoting brain health. It might be more complicated than 'this food is good or bad.' Dr. Angela Hanson, a geriatric physician at the University of Washington, is conducting a study that examines how a risk gene for Alzheimer's disease might affect people's memory and metabolic responses to different meals. Her preliminary work showed that people who carry the gene APOE4 (E4) responded differently to different Alzheimer's treatments and diets, compared to people who did not carry this gene. Dr. Hanson plans to study this further with the “Meal and Memory Study” in adults age 55 and older who do not have dementia. 

 

Eligibility: Participants may be men or women, ages 55 and older. People who have known dementia, or known diabetes, are not eligible.

 

Key researcher:  Angela Hanson, MD

Study Contact: Angela Hanson at 206-897-5393 or hansonaj@uw.edu

For More Information

MIND: Memory Improvement Through Nicotine Dosing

MIND: A National Research Treatment Study for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): Memory Improvement Through Nicotine Dosing

The purpose of this study is to determine whether daily transdermal nicotine (patch) will have a positive effect on early memory impairment in participants diagnosed with MCI.  This study, which will take place at multiple sites across the U.S., will consist of 12 visits over a 2-year period. 

 

Details:

Healthy, non-smoking adults, ages 55+, who either notice changes in their memory or whose family members notice memory changes may be eligible to participate.  The purpose of this study is to determine whether nicotine (in patch form) improves memory and functioning in adults diagnosed with MCI. Participants  will have extensive memory & cognitive testing as part of the screening process. Those who meet the study qualifications will be placed on either daily nicotine or placebo (inactive ingredient) patches. Some study sites will additionally conduct an MRI (brain scan) in addition to the regular study procedures.

Participants are required to have a study partner who will accompany them to each appointment.  This partner may be a family member, close friend, or caregiver.  This person must be someone that knows the participant well and spends a minimum of 10 hours a week with them.  This is necessary in order for the partner to give the research staff feedback on the participant’s memory, health, & functioning throughout the study.

Learn More: MIND Study Website and Frequently Asked Questions

 

Study Coordinator: Yeung Tutterrow  |  Email: ylt2@uw.edu 

Study Principle Investigator: Dr. Michael Persenaire, MD

For More Information

PoND: Prazosin and CSF Biomarkers in Aging, MCI and AD

We are seeking healthy, medically stable volunteers over the age of 45 who do not have memory problems for a new approach to preventing Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

Details

  • The study includes an assessment of your physical and mental health.
  • You will receive prazosin (a pill used for posttraumatic stress disorder and high blood pressure).
  • The study will take about 14 hours, spread over roughly 9 visits during a 3-month period.
  • These visits will be at the Seattle VA.
  • You will be compensated for each of your visits, with the total compensation for the study amounting to $750 to $825.

Key Researcher: The PI of this study is Murray Raskind at S-116-MIRECC, 1660 S. Columbian Way, Seattle, WA  98108.

Study Contact: 206.277.1491 or 1.800.329.8387 ext. 1491 

For More Information

Prazosin and CSF Biomarkers in mTBI

Prazosin and CSF Biomarkers in mTBI

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) from explosions is the “signature injury” of Veterans who have deployed to the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Although the immediate effects of a single mTBI usually resolve over days or weeks, multiple mTBIs can lead to both persistent symptoms and, years later, to two fatal progressive brain diseases, chronic traumatic encephalopathy and Alzheimer's disease. It is believed that these diseases are caused by nerve damaging chemicals called tau and beta amyloid produced by the brain but which are not removed from the brain in a normal manner in persons with mTBIs. The investigators will determine in Veterans who experienced mTBIs whether a clinically available drug called prazosin increases removal of tau and beta amyloid from the brain. This will be accomplished by seeing if prazosin reduces the amount of tau and beta amyloid in the spinal fluid that surrounds the brain. If the investigators find such reductions, prazosin will be evaluated as a preventative treatment in future studies. (from Clinical Trials.gov)

 

Key researcher: Murray A Raskind, MD, VA Puget Sound Health Care System Seattle Division, Seattle, WA

Study Contacts: Rebecca C Hendrickson, MD | Rebecca.Hendrickson@va.gov | 206-277-5054

                         Hollie A Holmes | hollie.holmes@va.gov | (206) 277-6207

Trial Description on clinicaltrials.gov

For More Information

Technology for Early Dementia Diagnosis

Researchers at the VA Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Centers are studying wearable technologies that may be useful to help diagnose Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

ELIGIBILITY

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements:

-Have a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or probable dementia with Lewy Bodies

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you

-Have at least 8 years of education

 

COMPENSATION

Volunteers who complete this study will receive up to $250 in appreciation for their time and participation.

 

CONTACT

Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

Study PI: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The purpose of the Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium is to develop a collection of samples from individuals diagnosed with dementia with lewy bodies (DLB), dementia with lewy bodies/mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or Parkinson's disease dementia who will be followed over time. The consortium will collect detailed clinical information, biospecimens, and imaging data. Led by top leaders in the field, this consortium will fill the gap in resources available for biomarker development in Lewy Body Dementia and promote additional future research by having a readily available subject sample. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you:

-Have a diagnosis of probable dementia with lewy body/MCI or Parkinson's disease dementia

-Have a study partner who is able and willing to comply with required study procedures

-Have at least eight years of education

The study doctor will also check for other medical conditions or reasons that might prevent you from participating in the study

 

Study Leader: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW

Seattle Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

For More Information