We have been printing many, many molds and having great fun casting glass (more posts on that subject later).   It seems that our kilns have been going non-stop over the past week (what an exciting time in our lab).

Today’s post is a new development that came as a result  of observing  the glass molds after the casting process.    The molds were quite robust after firing.   We tested fired PVOH (hydroperm) past 2200 F (1200 C) succesfully.  Thus it seemed that PVOH might be able to take glaze!  Wow!

We test fired a few bars with glaze and the results were positive (although they were very porous).    Laura West suggested showing something cool (not just your standard test bars).

glypsum_finish glypsum1 glypsum2

We present a simple bowl with glaze and and some dark blue crystal glaze sprinkles.     We took care of the porosity issue by infusing with colloidal silica before glazing.

With all of our excitement, we sent an email to Michael Eden in England with a simple question “Hey Michael, have you ever heard of anyone glazing plaster?”.  The answer “Yes, me!”

{Copyright Michael Eden}

“I infused one of the commercial printing plasters with a proprietary refractory infiltrate (from Axiatec) that allows it to be heated to 1500C (2730F). The material is too absorbent for glaze, so I coated with vitreous slip, fired it to 1000 C, then dipped it into our lovely lead glaze, stained with copper oxide. Then fired to 1085 (1985F)

Definitely a case of the pre-industrial meeting the post-industrial!”
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Great fun to find other minds that ask the same questions “What if you did …  OR Could we do that…?”

6 Comments on Introducing Glypsum (glazed gypsum plaster)

  1. […] 17th 3D printing materials savant Mark Ganter and his research team at the Solheim lab introduce glazed gypsum as a 3D printing material. Previously the Open3DP team  also came up with several inexpensive materials and a glass 3D […]

  2. […] 17th 3D printing materials savant Mark Ganter and his research team at the Solheim lab introduce glazed gypsum as a 3D printing material. Previously the Open3DP team  also came up with several inexpensive materials and a glass 3D […]

  3. jenani says:

    Dear Sir and Madam

    we are from the University of Bremen. We have received project. actually we need some information about Introducing Glypsum (glazed gypsum plaster. If you don’t mind can u give us some infomation. we still want to try the same. how we can do that. how much does the whole.

    I am looking forward on your reply!

    Regards Jenani

  4. jenani says:

    Dear Sir and Madam

    we are from the University of Bremen. We have received project. actually we need some information about Introducing Glypsum (glazed gypsum plaster. If you don’t mind can u give us some infomation. we still want to try the same. how we can do that. how much does the whole.

    I am looking forward on your reply!

    Regards Jenani

  5. Neil Ward says:

    Hello! I have been trying to replicate this process, but so far to no avail! Can you help? I am printing with hydroperm, using an alcohol / water binder, then brushing on colloidal silica. I have test-fired a number of pieces, and all end up the same – powdery and porous, and more delicate than before firing. I have fired from cone 05 to cone 6, most as fast firing schedules.

    Whether firing with or within the colldial silica, all are delicate and powdery. The only different is that with the silica, the piece is white. If the piece was stable and durable, I would consider this a success with further testing required. However, it doesn’t seem that I am getting the durable results you were. Any thoughts?

    • ganter says:

      Neil, we didn’t fire with colloidal silica. We just added lower fire (cone 06) glaze and then fired. Colloidal silica needs a much higher firing temperature to fuse properly.

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