NOW MSN network has an article entitled Sweet new printer pumps out 3-D chocolate creations. 

The posting was forwarded to me by Dennis DePape (an architect that I work with).

It is really interesting idea but a little late (perhaps 5-6 years).   We tried to post a comment but alas the only comments that are allowed are those people who are part of Windows Live.   No other ID’s are trusted (I guess that’s the implication).

Instead, here’s our comment:

” Check out Fab-at-Home.org.  Circa 2006/2007 for Version 1.   We at Open3DP got a Fab-at-Home and by the Spring of 2007 we were printing in Chocolate with a heated syringe to assist the chocolate flow.   We even put down peanut butter (think peanut- butter cups).

The Fab-at-Home group have several write-ups on printing food.

Any RepRap or PrintrBot can add the Frustruder/Syringe kit and print in chocolate for a total cost with everything new of less than $1000.   There are over 50,000 RepRaps in the world. Anyone of them could add Frostruder/Syringe hardware to do this for a cost of well less than $200.”

 

Why is this the NOW news?

 

UnFold.be has even printed in ceramics and clays….
P.S.  This update came in yesterday.
The folks over at RichRap.Blogspot have published on Thingiverse the Universal Paste Extruder.  It looks like
something that we  should print and give it a try (no more compressed required).   Excellent Work!

6 Comments on Sweet but not so new printer

  1. Gary Hodgson says:

    Agreed, hard to imagine what $4,600 brings to the table. Plus Richrap posted his Universal Paste Extruder for
    RepRap just the other day, with great examples and guides of printing with pastes, including chocolate: http://richrap.blogspot.de/201.....-food.html

  2. Gary Hodgson says:

    Agreed, hard to imagine what $4,600 brings to the table. Plus Richrap posted his Universal Paste Extruder for
    RepRap just the other day, with great examples and guides of printing with pastes, including chocolate: http://richrap.blogspot.de/201.....-food.html

  3. Martinette says:

    Prosthetics made with 3d printers are probably the most noble use for these devices. At TEDxCambridge, Scott Summit shows 3D-printed, individually designed prosthetic legs that are unabashedly artificial and completely personal. Great video worth watching.

  4. Martinette says:

    Prosthetics made with 3d printers are probably the most noble use for these devices. At TEDxCambridge, Scott Summit shows 3D-printed, individually designed prosthetic legs that are unabashedly artificial and completely personal. Great video worth watching.