Physiology and Biophysics

Emeritus Faculty

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Marjorie E. Anderson Ph.D.

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Marge received her PhD in Physiology and Biophysics from the University of Washington in 1969. After two years of postdoctoral work at The Rockefeller University, she returned to the department of Rehabilitation Medicine at UW in 1971 and became a joint appointee in PBio in 1973. As an affiliate of the Primate Center, her research has focused on the roles of the basal ganglia in controlling movement, both in normal animals and in those with drug-induced parkinsonism.

Marge has twice served as Acting Chair of Rehabilitation Medicine and, as one of the few women who were early basic scientists in the School of Medicine, she led committees that focused on issues of women faculty. In retirement, she continues to mentor postdocs and junior faculty, especially physical therapists doing translational research on motor function.

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Albert Berger Ph.D.

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After 33 years on the PBIO faculty, Albert Berger joined the ranks of Emeritus Professor, effective July 1, 2011. Albert joined the department in 1978, was promoted to Associate Professor in 1980 and to Professor in 1985. Trained in chemical engineering (Bachelors degree from Cornell and PhD from Princeton), he worked as a research engineer for a few years before joining the faculty at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. In 1972, he began graduate study at UCSF and earned a PhD in Physiology.

Albert has won numerous awards, including a Ford Foundation Fellowship, a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship and a Fogarty Fellowship. He received two Javits awards (contiguous) from the NIH for his research on neuronal regulation of respiration. Albert co-authored a text book on Physiology of Respiration and has published more than 125 research papers. During his tenure as a faculty member, Albert taught many courses and served as course director on several occasions.

In 2000, Albert served as acting chair of the Department of Physiology & Biophysics. From 2001-2005, he was Vice Dean for Research & Graduate Education in the UW School of Medicine.

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George L. Brengelmann Ph.D.

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Eric O. Feigl M.D.

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Albert F. Fuchs Ph.D.

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Albert M. Gordon Ph.D.

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Albert joined the Department in 1962 as a postdoctoral fellow, became an assistant professor in 1965 and quickly advanced through the ranks, achieving full professor status in 1975. Albert continued his research on muscle contraction here at the University of Washington and has made numerous important contributions to our understanding of calcium regulation of contraction and the role of the troponins. He received a Jacob Javits Neuroscience Award from the NIH in 1984 and is an honorary Professor of Physiology at Guangzhou Medical College. Perhaps, most notably, he has served for many years as the Department’s representative to the WWAMI program. Despite becoming Emeritus Professor in 2002, Albert will maintain a close connection with the Department by continuing to teach in the medical course, serving as the WWAMI coordinator and collaborating with his research colleagues.

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Michael P. Hlastala Ph.D.

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Donna J. Koerker Ph.D.

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Martin Kushmerick M.D., Ph.D.

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Loring B. Rowell Ph.D.

Dr. Rowell earned his Ph.D. in Physiology at the University of Minnesota in 1962. He joined the UW faculty in the Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology from 1963 to 1970. He then received a joint appointment in the Department of Physiology & Biophysics and Medicine/Cardiology and has worked here until his retirement in 1997. He continues to lecture, write and review.

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Peter Schwindt Ph.D.

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Orville A. Smith Ph.D.

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Dr. Smith received his Ph.D. in Psychology from Michigan State University in 1953. He came to the Physiology and Biophysics Department and Regional Primate Center in 1958. He was the Director of the Primate Center from 1971 until 1988. Dr. Smith retired from the department in 1997, but continues to work.

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William L. Stahl Ph.D.

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Bill received his B.S. in Chemistry at the University of Notre Dame in 1958 and his Ph.D. in Biochemistry at the University of Pittsburgh in 1963. After post-doctoral work in London at the Institute of Psychiatry and in Bethesda at the NIH he came to Seattle in 1967 with joint faculty appointments in Physiology and Biophysics and Medicine (Neurology) and the VA Medical Center, advancing to full professor in 1977. His work centered on mechanisms of ion transport in the nervous system. In 2003 he became Professor Emeritus at the UW and Executive Director of the Histochemical Society. He mow works on administration for the Society and develops and teaches laboratory-based immunohistochemistry and microscopy courses which are offered at the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole.

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Charles Stirling Ph.D.

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Charles joined the Department in 1968 as an assistant professor and became professor in 1980. His main research focus was how proteins that transport Na and small molecules are organized in epithelial tissues and the retina. Studies of note are the membrane defect in the genetic decease "Glucose-Galactose Malabsorption", the role of the Na pump in secretory epithelia. The relative distribution of the Na pump in the kidney and the origin of the "dark current" in vertebrate photoreceptors. His teaching encompassed graduate, medical, dental and nursing students. His present interest is in developing "web based" teaching material for selective subjects in physiology.