Making the Case for P-3

To establish and sustain comprehensive P-3 approaches, it is necessary to convince policymakers, key stakeholders, and the public that traditional approaches to education reform are not as effective as they could be. Further, it is necessary to engage policymakers and other stakeholders in active opposition of P-3 approaches. To accomplish this, it is important to make compelling and persuasive arguments about the far-reaching benefits of P-3 approaches.

The following resources provide compelling arguments that "make the case" for P-3:

Overview of Issues

Publication Date: Jan 2013
Authors:
Kristie Kauerz
Synopsis:

Birth-through-age-8 reform efforts are based on an in-depth understanding of what young children need to develop the skills, knowledge, behaviors, and dispositions that will enable them to succeed in school and life. Akin to entrepreneurial endeavors, these reform efforts embrace a multi-sector approach to establishing and linking services and systems to meet and nurture children's comprehensive needs. 

Publication Date: Mar 2013
Authors:
Kristie Kauerz
Synopsis:

Comprehensive PreK-3rd grade approaches hold tremendous potential to dramatically change the trajectory of achievement gaps and set young children on sturdy pathways to educational and lifelong success. Elementary principals are the lynchpin of effective P-3 work, as they set the tone and priorities both inside and outside of their buildings. 

Commissioned Papers

Publication Date: Jan 2009
Authors:
Rima Shore
Synopsis:

This brief makes the case that a more reasoned, realistic approach to school reform — one that builds a solid foundation for learning by providing coordinated, enhanced learning opportunities every year from PreK (for three- and four-year-olds) through 3rd Grade (PreK-3rd) — offers the best chance for raising achievement. This paper challenges three pervasive myths about early and elementary education:

  • Myth 1: Elementary schools are doing just fine; problems begin later.
  • Myth 2: Good PreK programs guarantee later success.
  • Myth 3: Solving the “Fourth-Grade slump” will reverse today’s widespread pattern of underachievement.
Publication Date: Apr 2017
Authors:
Deborah Phillips, Mark Lipsey, Kenneth Dodge, Ron Haskins, Daphna Bassok, Margaret Burchinal, Greg Duncan, Mark Dynarski, Katherine Magnuson, and Christina Weiland
Synopsis:

This report, authored by a task force comprised of esteemed social scientists from Brookings and Duke University, includes six consensus statements on what is known about the effects of PreK. Not surprisingly, but of great importance, the scholars agree that what happens before, during, and after PreK all matter.

Policy Briefs

Publication Date: Jan 2009
Authors:
Sharon Ritchie, Gisele Crawford
Synopsis:

This brief focuses on strategies and approaches used in the United States and internationally to re-prioritize the use of time in schools, and explores several areas of time-use beyond those most often cited in literature. It concludes that in order for schools to be more effective and more responsive to children and families, it is essential to engage in professional learning communities; develop positive relationships with students; build and sustain school-family partnerships; learn new skills and acquire more in-depth understanding of subject matter; and enhance communication across disciplines. 

Publication Date: Jan 2009
Authors:
Kelly Maxwell, Sharon Ritchie, Sue Bredekamp, Tracy Zimmerman
Synopsis:

Four foundational elements of young children's develolpment underlie their competence and appear to predict their success in school from PreK through 3rd grade: self regulation, representation, memory, and attachment. Infusing knowledge about child development into the early education system would transform early schooling and help all children achieve and succeed.