Dr. Anne Goodchild

Questions and Answers

Profile: Dr. Anne Goodchild

I’m leading investigations into:

  • Urban Freight Score’ which will define and quantify the features needed for trucks to load and unload goods in cities (height and other infrastructure conditions, drive-through or not, and other operating requirements), rate locations, and create city maps showing where trucks can get in and out easily and where they cannot.  

  • Final Fifty Feet: Urban Goods Delivery Systems’ that is testing real-world solutions to improve management of truck parking and commercial vehicle load zones, and private operations that move goods  from the city street to the city resident or retailer who takes receipt of the goods.

  • ‘National Freight Model’ that is building the first behaviorally-based national freight model for the United States. This will dramatically improve our ability to forecast freight flows at the national level.

  • ‘Bike-Truck Interactions’ where we are using a variety of empirical, data analysis, and simulation techniques to understand and improve the safety of cyclists when operating around trucks.

I love working with students. I feel very privileged to work with bright, motivated, and sincere people who are working to improve the world we live in. They keep me learning and give me hope for the future!

 

When I was a little girl I was fascinated by big transportation problems. I remember travelling to Washington, D.C. with my parents and riding the subway for the first time. I loved reading the map, figuring out the schedule, and planning our routes. I also remember visiting a postal sorting station on a school field trip and being absolutely fascinated that they could process so much mail with such speed and accuracy, with handwritten addresses! I’ve still never had a piece of mail get lost.  

 

I was born in London, Ontario, Canada, and lived there until I was 16, when I moved to California. My favorite thing to eat is fresh, ripe berries.

Photo by Anna Bovbjerg: SCTL Center Research Asst., student MSc(Eng.), University of Washington

What is your hometown and favorite food?

I was born in London, Ontario, Canada, and lived there until I was 16, when I moved to California. My favorite thing to eat is fresh, ripe berries.

What inspired you to pursue a career in supply chain, transportation and logistics?

When I was a little girl I was fascinated by big transportation problems. I remember travelling to Washington, D.C. with my parents and riding the subway for the first time. I loved reading the map, figuring out the schedule, and planning our routes. I also remember visiting a postal sorting station on a school field trip and being absolutely fascinated that they could process so much mail with such speed and accuracy, with handwritten addresses! I’ve still never had a piece of mail get lost.  

 

What has been a highlight of being a faculty member at the UW SCTL?

I love working with students. I feel very privileged to work with bright, motivated, and sincere people who are working to improve the world we live in. They keep me learning and give me hope for the future!

 

What research projects are you working on?

I’m leading investigations into:

  • Urban Freight Score’ which will define and quantify the features needed for trucks to load and unload goods in cities (height and other infrastructure conditions, drive-through or not, and other operating requirements), rate locations, and create city maps showing where trucks can get in and out easily and where they cannot.  

  • Final Fifty Feet: Urban Goods Delivery Systems’ that is testing real-world solutions to improve management of truck parking and commercial vehicle load zones, and private operations that move goods  from the city street to the city resident or retailer who takes receipt of the goods.

  • ‘National Freight Model’ that is building the first behaviorally-based national freight model for the United States. This will dramatically improve our ability to forecast freight flows at the national level.

  • ‘Bike-Truck Interactions’ where we are using a variety of empirical, data analysis, and simulation techniques to understand and improve the safety of cyclists when operating around trucks.