Gabriela Girón-Valderrama

Profile: Gabriela Girón-Valderrama

I was born and raised in Panama City, Panama, and my favorite food is sushi.

Transportation issues are one of the biggest challenges in Panama City, my hometown. Therefore, my interest in this topic started since I was young. I grew up learning that enhancing the transportation network system is one of the main requirements for promoting national development, generating economic development and improving access to goods and services. After taking the Transportation course during my undergrad, I knew I wanted to become a transportation engineer. 

 

I’m on the following teams:

  • The Final 50 Feet of the Urban Goods Delivery System, which develops new data, knowledge and strategies to address the urban goods delivery system management in the City of Seattle. 

  • Greater Downtown Seattle Area Cordon Data Collection for Trucks and Cars, which establishes a baseline cordon truck and car count for the Greater Downtown area of Seattle

  • Ballard Cordon Data Collection for Trucks and Cars, which establishes a baseline cordon truck and car count for the Ballard neighborhood and Ballard Interbay North Manufacturing and Industrial Center (BINMIC) in Seattle

  • "Logistics Sprawl" to analyze the reported tendency of warehouses to move away from the urban center to more suburban and exurban areas

  • The "Last 800-ft of the Pickup/Delivery Operation" is a micro-scale analysis to develop a more holistic approach to understand the pickup and drop-off operations in the urban environment

Research Assistant, Urban Freight Lab
Ph.D. Student, Civil and Environmental Engineering (Transportation Track)
gabgv13@uw.edu
Office: 
Wilson Ceramics Lab 111

Bio

Gabriela Girón holds a BS in Civil Engineering from the Technological University of Panama and an MS in Civil Engineering (Transportation Track) from the University of Washington. She is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Transportation Engineering from the University of Washington as well as serving as a research assistant for the Urban Freight Lab and a Teaching Assistant for the Supply Chain Transportation & Logistics Master's degree program.

She is a member of the Urban Freight Transportation Committee (AT025) of the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine's Transportation Research Board (TRB)

Awards

  • Rising Star, Carnegie Mellon University's Civil and Environmental Engineering Rising Stars workshop (2020)
  • Thomas D. Larson Fellow, Eno Center for Transportation Future Leaders Program (2019)
  • Recipient, Women's Transportation Seminar Puget Sound - Scott White Memorial Scholarship (2018)
  • First Place, Washington State Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) Student Night Competition (2017)
  • Scholarship Recipient, Fulbright Student Scholarship Program (2015)

Questions and Answers

What is your hometown and favorite food?

I was born and raised in Panama City, Panama, and my favorite food is sushi.

What inspired you to pursue a career in supply chain, transportation and logistics?

Transportation issues are one of the biggest challenges in Panama City, my hometown. Therefore, my interest in this topic started since I was young. I grew up learning that enhancing the transportation network system is one of the main requirements for promoting national development, generating economic development and improving access to goods and services. After taking the Transportation course during my undergrad, I knew I wanted to become a transportation engineer. 

 

What research projects are you working on?

I’m on the following teams:

  • The Final 50 Feet of the Urban Goods Delivery System, which develops new data, knowledge and strategies to address the urban goods delivery system management in the City of Seattle. 

  • Greater Downtown Seattle Area Cordon Data Collection for Trucks and Cars, which establishes a baseline cordon truck and car count for the Greater Downtown area of Seattle

  • Ballard Cordon Data Collection for Trucks and Cars, which establishes a baseline cordon truck and car count for the Ballard neighborhood and Ballard Interbay North Manufacturing and Industrial Center (BINMIC) in Seattle

  • "Logistics Sprawl" to analyze the reported tendency of warehouses to move away from the urban center to more suburban and exurban areas

  • The "Last 800-ft of the Pickup/Delivery Operation" is a micro-scale analysis to develop a more holistic approach to understand the pickup and drop-off operations in the urban environment

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