Mr. David Tomporowski

Questions and Answers

Profile: Mr. David Tomporowski

I grew up in a small town in Minnesota called Perham, and lived in the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul for nine years before moving to Seattle. My favorite food is Japanese ramen. 

I grew up vacationing in Seattle every summer to visit family. During these visits, I quickly became fascinated with the large presence of freight and logistics activities in the city—the dense network of ships, cranes, containers, trucks, terminals, and train yards largely concentrated around the Port of Seattle. During college, I found ways to study freight transportation through the context of geography, and while working in statewide freight planning in Minnesota I came to understand freight transportation as a unique transportation planning, policy, and engineering challenge: a largely private sector industry that transports the freight, and the various public entities that own and maintain the infrastructure that the shippers depend on must cooperate together to deliver products safely, cost-effectively, and on time.

I decided to pursue graduate work in the place where my interest started—Seattle—with the academic and professional goal of linking freight transportation and urban planning. In my masters program I am studying issues of freight congestion and bottlenecks within and around major intermodal facilities.

I am working on several components of the City of Seattle’s Final 50 Feet project: the development of a toolkit documenting the steps we took to record loading docks and bays, and an ambitious data collection and analysis effort to document features of all alleys in Downtown Seattle. I monitor various government, academic, and research sites for available grant opportunities and calls for research proposals, and have led the drafting of a research proposal for a state DOT research program. I also provide editing and writing support for our research center’s many written reports and products.

I am excited and honored to be a part of the Center for Supply Chain Transportation and Logistics, which, as a new applied research center, has quickly become well known regionally, nationally, and internationally for its innovative work on studying urban goods movement. The SCTL has established itself as an important member of the small group of freight transportation research programs and consortiums around the world that drive pioneering research and real-world problem-solving for the freight and logistics industries. A highlight of my graduate work has been collaborating with my fellow motivated and incredibly smart research assistants, as well as Professor Anne Goodchild and Chief Operating Officer Barbara Ivanov, who are both well-known and widely-respected in their own right in freight planning, engineering, and logistics circles across academia, government, and the private sector. 

What is your hometown and favorite food?

I grew up in a small town in Minnesota called Perham, and lived in the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul for nine years before moving to Seattle. My favorite food is Japanese ramen. 

What inspired you to pursue a career in supply chain, transportation and logistics?

I grew up vacationing in Seattle every summer to visit family. During these visits, I quickly became fascinated with the large presence of freight and logistics activities in the city—the dense network of ships, cranes, containers, trucks, terminals, and train yards largely concentrated around the Port of Seattle. During college, I found ways to study freight transportation through the context of geography, and while working in statewide freight planning in Minnesota I came to understand freight transportation as a unique transportation planning, policy, and engineering challenge: a largely private sector industry that transports the freight, and the various public entities that own and maintain the infrastructure that the shippers depend on must cooperate together to deliver products safely, cost-effectively, and on time.

I decided to pursue graduate work in the place where my interest started—Seattle—with the academic and professional goal of linking freight transportation and urban planning. In my masters program I am studying issues of freight congestion and bottlenecks within and around major intermodal facilities.

What research projects are you working on?

I am working on several components of the City of Seattle’s Final 50 Feet project: the development of a toolkit documenting the steps we took to record loading docks and bays, and an ambitious data collection and analysis effort to document features of all alleys in Downtown Seattle. I monitor various government, academic, and research sites for available grant opportunities and calls for research proposals, and have led the drafting of a research proposal for a state DOT research program. I also provide editing and writing support for our research center’s many written reports and products.

What has been a highlight of being a research assistant at the UW SCTL?

I am excited and honored to be a part of the Center for Supply Chain Transportation and Logistics, which, as a new applied research center, has quickly become well known regionally, nationally, and internationally for its innovative work on studying urban goods movement. The SCTL has established itself as an important member of the small group of freight transportation research programs and consortiums around the world that drive pioneering research and real-world problem-solving for the freight and logistics industries. A highlight of my graduate work has been collaborating with my fellow motivated and incredibly smart research assistants, as well as Professor Anne Goodchild and Chief Operating Officer Barbara Ivanov, who are both well-known and widely-respected in their own right in freight planning, engineering, and logistics circles across academia, government, and the private sector. 

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