Mr. Jose Machado

Questions and Answers

Profile: Mr. Jose Machado

I was born and raised in Murcia, a city on Southeast Spain, and my favorite food is gazpacho manchego, which is a traditional dish in a region in middle Spain famous for the adventures of Don Quijote de la Mancha.

 

During my undergrad studies, I realized that I would find the most fascinating projects of civil infrastructure in transportation. It requires modeling but also includes community values and expectations.  I love both math and working with people, so I decided to become a transportation engineer.

 

Looking back to my first year as a graduate student and all the hard work, the most rewarding moments have been all the opportunities to develop critical thinking and practical skills; hands-on activities and projects closely related to the profession such as planning public transit services in Seattle.

 
  • The ‘Community Resilience Modeling Environment’ project is funded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). We are developing computer tools that help local governments build resilience against natural hazards, such as tsunamis near the coast.

  • ‘Final-50-Feet: Urban Freight Delivery Systems’ project is funded by the Seattle Department of Transportation and the SCTL Center, and we are developing a toolkit to improve urban freight delivery operations in dense urban areas of Seattle. 

Photo by Anna Bovbjerg Alligood: SCTL Center Research Asst., student MSc(Eng.), University of Washington

What is your hometown and favorite food?

I was born and raised in Murcia, a city on Southeast Spain, and my favorite food is gazpacho manchego, which is a traditional dish in a region in middle Spain famous for the adventures of Don Quijote de la Mancha.

 

What inspired you to pursue a career in supply chain, transportation and logistics?

During my undergrad studies, I realized that I would find the most fascinating projects of civil infrastructure in transportation. It requires modeling but also includes community values and expectations.  I love both math and working with people, so I decided to become a transportation engineer.

 

What has been a highlight of being a research assistant at the UW SCTL?

Looking back to my first year as a graduate student and all the hard work, the most rewarding moments have been all the opportunities to develop critical thinking and practical skills; hands-on activities and projects closely related to the profession such as planning public transit services in Seattle.

 

What research projects are you working on?

  • The ‘Community Resilience Modeling Environment’ project is funded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). We are developing computer tools that help local governments build resilience against natural hazards, such as tsunamis near the coast.

  • ‘Final-50-Feet: Urban Freight Delivery Systems’ project is funded by the Seattle Department of Transportation and the SCTL Center, and we are developing a toolkit to improve urban freight delivery operations in dense urban areas of Seattle. 

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