Research Publication

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Paper

ITS Devices Used to Collect Truck Data for Performance Benchmarks

Date of Publication: 2006

Authored by: Ed McCormack, Mark Hallenbeck

Publication: Transportation Research Record

Volume: 1957

Pages: 43-50

Publication URL:
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0361198106195700107

Publication File:
ITS Devices Used to Collect Truck Data for Performance Benchmarks

Recommended Citation:

McCormack, Edward & Hallenbeck, Mark. (2006). ITS Devices Used to Collect Truck Data for Performance Benchmarks. Transportation Research Record. 1957. 43-50. 10.3141/1957-07. 

Abstract:

This paper documents the development of data collection methodologies that can be used to measure truck movements along specific roadway corridors in Washington State cost-effectively. The intent of this study was to design and test methodologies that could provide information to ascertain the performance of freight mobility roadway improvement projects. The benchmarks created would be used to report on speed and volume improvements that resulted from completed roadway projects. One technology tested consisted of Commercial Vehicle Information System and Networks electronic truck transponders, which were mounted on the windshields of approximately 30,000 trucks traveling in Washington. These transponders were used at weigh stations across the state to improve the efficiency of truck regulatory compliance checks. With transponder reads from sites anywhere in the state being linked through software, the transponder-equipped trucks can become a travel time probe fleet. The second technology tested involved Global Positioning Systems (GPS) placed in volunteer trucks to collect specific truck movement data at 5-s intervals. GPS data made it possible to locate when and where monitored trucks experienced congestion. With this information aggregated over time, it was possible to generate performance statistics related to the reliability of truck trips and even to examine changes in route choice for trips between high-volume origin-destination pairs. The study found that both data collection technologies could be useful; however, the key to either technology is whether enough instrumented vehicles pass over the roadways for which data are required.

Research Topic(s):
Truck Travel Time Performance Measurement and Modeling

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