Research Publications

Seattle Center City Alley Infrastructure Inventory and Occupancy Study 2018

 

Final 50 Feet - Common Carrier Locker Pilot Test at Seattle Municipal Tower

 

Common Carrier Locker Systems - Phase I

The Final 50 Feet Urban Goods Delivery System

If you need help with access to any of these publications, please contact us at sctl@uw.edu.

Student Theses and Dissertations
Published:
2012
Authored by: Kelly A. Pitera

The effective and efficient movement of freight is essential to the economic well-being of our country but freight transport also adversely impacts our society by contributing to a large number of crashes, including those resulting in injuries and fatalities.

Paper
Published:
2012
Authored by: Erica Wygonik, Anne Goodchild

This paper compares the CO2 emissions from the use of personal vehicles to shared-use vehicles for grocery shopping in Seattle, Washington. The research builds on existing literature by considering the importance of modeling the logistical details of routing and scheduling, and by comparing the results of an American case study to existing European case studies.

Paper
Published:
2011
Authored by: Kelly Pitera, Felipe Sandoval, Anne Goodchild

A case study of the University of Washington Mailing Service, which operates a heterogeneous fleet of vehicles, provides insight into the impact of operational changes on cost, service quality, and emissions. An emissions minimization problem was formulated and solutions were identified with a creation and local search algorithm based on the I1 and 2-opts heuristics.

Paper
Published:
2011
Authored by: Anne Goodchild, J. G. McCall, John Zumerchik, Jack Lanigan

North American rail terminals need productivity improvements to handle increasing rail volumes and improve terminal performance. This paper examines the benefits of double cycling in wide-span gantry terminals that use automated transfer management systems.

Paper
Published:
2011
Authored by: Gautam Gupta, Anne Goodchild, and Mark Hansen

This paper presents a model for planning an air charter service for pre-scheduled group travel. This model is used to investigate the competitiveness of such an enterprise for student athlete travel in conference sports. The relevant demand subset to be served by a limited charter fleet is identified through a comparison with existing scheduled travel options. Further, the routing and scheduling of the charter aircraft is performed within the same framework.

Paper
Published:
2011
Authored by: Xiaolei Ma, Ed McCormack, Yinhai Wang

Although trucks move larger volumes of goods than other modes of transportation, public agencies know little about their travel patterns and how the roadway network performs for trucks. Trucking companies use data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) provided by commercial vendors to dispatch and track their equipment.

Paper
Published:
2011
Authored by: Erica Wygonik and Anne Goodchild

Growing pressure to limit greenhouse gas emissions is changing the way businesses operate. This paper presents the trade-offs between cost, service quality (represented by time window guarantees), and emissions of an urban pickup and delivery system under these changing pressures. A model, developed by the authors in ArcGIS, is used to evaluate these trade-offs for a specific case study involving a real fleet with specific operational characteristics.

Paper
Published:
2011
Authored by: Wenjuan Zhao, Anne Goodchild, Ed McCormack

A number of trucking companies use Global Positioning System (GPS) devices for fleet management. Data extracted from these devices can provide valuable traffic information such as spot (instantaneous) speeds and vehicle trajectory. However, the accuracy of GPS spot speeds has not been fully explored, and there is concern about their use for estimating truck travel speed. This concern was addressed by initially comparing GPS spot speeds with speeds estimated from dual-loop detectors.

Paper
Published:
2011
Authored by: Wenjuan Zhao and Anne Goodchild

This article will explore the reliability of the port drayage network. Port drayage is an important component of the marine intermodal system and affects the efficiency of the intermodal supply chain. Sharing and utilizing drayage truck arrival information could improve both port drayage and port operational efficiency. In this article two reliability measures are used to evaluate how the travel time reliability changes with trip origins and across drayage networks.

Student Theses and Dissertations
Published:
2011
Authored by: Wenjuan Zhao

Container terminals are important intermodal interfaces between marine and land transport networks. These interfaces have historically been sources of congestion and logistical inefficiencies. Exacerbated by growing trade volumes, the terminals have become bottlenecks in the port-related supply chain. This research explores using truck arrival information to integrate drayage truck and container terminal operations and improve intermodal system efficiency.

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