Final 50 Feet: Urban Goods Delivery System

The Seattle Neighborhood Delivery Hub Pilot Project: An Evaluation of the Operational Impacts of a Neighborhood Delivery Hub Model on Last-Mile Delivery

As one of the nation's first zero-emissions last-mile delivery pilots, the Seattle Neighborhood Delivery Hub serves as a testbed for innovative sustainable urban logistics strategies on the ground in Seattle's dense Uptown neighborhood. Providers can test and evaluate new technologies, vehicles, and delivery models — all in service of quickly getting to market new more fuel- and resource-efficient solutions, reducing emissions and congestion, and making our cities more livable and sustainable.

Generating Opportunity for All (GOAL): Micro-Freight Hubs Feasibility in North Fort Smith, Arkansas

(This project is being conducted under the Urban Freight Lab's (UFL) Technical Assistance Program, where UFL contributes to the project by providing 1:1 match funds in terms of staff and/or research assistants to complete project tasks.)

NYC Zero-Emission Freight and Green Loading Zone Market Research

(This project is being conducted under the Urban Freight Lab's (UFL) Technical Assistance Program, where UFL contributes to the project by providing 1:1 match funds in terms of staff and/or research assistants to complete project tasks.)

Examining the Effects of Common Carrier Lockers on Residential Delivery

In recent years, e-commerce has dramatically increased deliveries to residential areas. The rise in delivery vehicle activity creates externalities for the transportation system, including congestion, competition for parking space, and emissions. Common carrier lockers have emerged as a way to manage these effects by consolidating deliveries, but they remain largely untested in the United States. This thesis examines the effects of a common carrier locker placed in a residential building in downtown Seattle, Washington. An experimental design with on-street data tests the effect of the locker on dwell times and time that delivery people spend in the building. Data collected by the locker provider gives insight into the e-commerce behavior patterns of residents. Finally, a simulation model was constructed to obtain the optimal configuration of box sizes in similar lockers. 

Understanding Urban Commercial Vehicle Driver Behaviors and Decision Making

As e-commerce and urban deliveries spike, cities grapple with managing urban freight more actively. To manage urban deliveries effectively, city planners and policy makers need to better understand driver behaviors and the challenges they experience in making deliveries. In this study, we collected data on commercial vehicle (CV) driver behaviors by performing ridealongs with various logistics carriers.

Empirical Analysis of Commercial Vehicle Dwell Times Around Freight-Attracting Urban Buildings in Downtown Seattle

Dwell time is defined as the time that delivery workers spend performing out-of-vehicle activities while their vehicle is parked. Restricting vehicle dwell time is widely used to manage commercial vehicle parking behavior. However, there is insufficient data to help assess the effectiveness of these restrictions. This makes it difficult for policymakers to account for the complexity of commercial vehicle parking behavior. The current study aims to identify factors correlated with dwell time for commercial vehicles.

Estimating the Location of Private Infrastructure for Delivery and Pick-Up Operations in Dense Urban Areas

This thesis presents the first predictive tool to estimate the presence of private freight loading/unloading infrastructure based on observable characteristics of property parcels and their buildings. The predictive model classifies parcels with and without these infrastructures using random forest, a supervised machine learning algorithm. The model was developed based on a rich geodatabase of private truck load/unload spaces in the City of Seattle and the King County tax parcel database. The performance of the random forest model was evaluated through cross-validated estimates of the test error. The distribution of the outcome variables is unbalance with over 90% of parcels without private freight infrastructure. To consider the problem of unbalance sample, the optimum model was set to maximize the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The authors investigated the confusion matrix and the model classifier was design to balance the sensitivity and specificity of the model. Model results showed AUC of 81.5%, a true positive rate of 82.1% and a misclassification error of 22.5%

Modeling of Urban Freight Deliveries: Operational Performance at the Final 50 Feet

This dissertation aims to provide insights and data-driven approaches to support freight plans in various cities around the globe with a focus on urban freight deliveries. To accomplish this goal, this dissertation first proposes to discover the current delivery process at the final 50 feet by creating value stream maps that summarize the flow of delivery activities and times, time variations between activities. The map will be based on the data collected from five freight-attracting buildings in downtown Seattle. Secondly, this research explores contributing factors associated with dwell time for commercial vehicles by building regression models. Dwell time, in this study, is defined as the time that delivery workers spend performing out-of-vehicle activities while their vehicle is parked. Finally, this dissertation predicts total time spent at the final 50 feet of delivery, including dwell times and parking-related times through discrete event simulations for various “what if” delivery scenarios.

Year Two Progress Report: Technology Integration to Gain Commercial Efficiency for the Urban Goods Delivery System, Meet Future Demand for City Passenger and Delivery Load/Unload Spaces, and Reduce Energy Consumption

We are living at the convergence of the rise of e-commerce, ride-hailing services, connected and autonomous vehicle technologies, and fast-growing cities. Online shoppers want the goods delivery system to bring them whatever they want, where they want it, in one to two hours. At the same time, many cities are replacing goods delivery load/unload spaces with transit and bike lanes.

A Data-Driven Simulation Tool for Dynamic Curb Planning and Management

Project Budget: $2.9M (UW amount: $500k)

Lead Institution:

  • Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL)

Partner Institutions:

  • University of Washington, Urban Freight Lab (UFL)
  • Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)
  • Lacuna Technologies, Inc. (Lacuna)
  • National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

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