Program

Sessions are scheduled from 9 AM Thursday, May 19 to 4 PM Saturday May 21. Conference dinner on Saturday, May 21.

Thursday, May 19 | Husky Union Building (HUB)

8:15-8:45 AM | Registration begins; coffee and pastries available, HUB 250
8:45-9:00 AM | Welcome, HUB 250
9:00-10:30 AM | Session 1
Session 1A | HUB 332 Session 1B | HUB 334

chair: Laurel Brinton, University of British Columbia

"profesing hur Iinocensy": Evidential Markers and Speech Representation in the Witness Testimonies Supporting the Accused during the Salem Witch Trials of 1692
Sarah Moar, University of British Columbia

The Epistemic Stance and the Rhetorical Stance: A Word Frequency Analysis of Epistemic Modal Verb Usage in Expert Witness Testimony in The Scopes Trial
Josh Eskew, University of Washington

What did prefixes have to do with the evolution of English stress?
Donka Minkova, UCLA

chair: Lindsay Rose Russell, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Audience, Context, and the Role of Written Communication in the Development of Language Policy in Alaska, 1877-1902
Jennifer C. Stone, University of Alaska Anchorage

Linguistic Reciprocity: An Examination of how Social Attitudes Influence Lexical and Semantic Change in Psychiatry’s "bible"—the DSM
Hunter C. Little, University of Washington

(Some of) What Lies Beneath: Ideological Problems of the Dictionary of American English and Dictionary of Americanisms
Michael Adams, Indiana University at Bloomington

10:30-10:45 AM | Break; coffee available, HUB 250
10:45am-12:15 PM | Session 2
Session 2A | HUB 332 Session 2B | HUB 334
Historical Sociolingustics I

chair: Chris C. Palmer, Kennesaw State University

-ster: The most interesting suffix in English
K. Aaron Smith and Zachary Dukic, Illinois State University

"Exceeding Great" Participles in Early Modern English: Problems of Categorization
Felicia Jean Steele, The College of New Jersey

A transhistorical approach to aspects of orality in digital writing practices: exploring coordinators and subordinators in five text types across the history of English
Imogen Marcus, Edge Hill University

organizer: Mark Richard Lauersdorf, University of Kentucky (NARNiHS)

Approaching the History of English "from below": The Value of Late Modern English Pauper Petitions
Anita Auer, Anne-Christine Gardner, Mark Iten, University of Lausanne

Reconsidering the Role of Race in Historical Sociolinguistics Data: Who Gets to Be Minnesotan?
Anna Whitney, University of Michigan

Oral Histories in Dialectology Research: Monophthongal /oʊ/ Among Nordic Americans in Seattle
Julia Thomas Swan, San Jose State University

12:15-1:30 PM | Lunch, HUB 250 (or on your own)
1:30-3:30 PM | Session 3
Session 3A | HUB 332 Session 3B | HUB 334
Historical Sociolingustics II

chair: Donka Minkova, UCLA

Moving forward: The development of a discourse marker
Sarah M. B. Fagan, Carolyn Whitehead, Jeffery Davis, Mary Johnson, The University of Iowa

"maybe I’m not that great of a person": intrusive of in the global 21st century
Mary Blockley, University of Texas at Austin

Why pronouns do not tend to change very often. Do they?
Peter Siemund, University of Hamburg

organizer: Mark Richard Lauersdorf, University of Kentucky (NARNiHS)

How to Certify the Truth: Stance, Evidential Verbs, and Intensifying Adverbs in Early and Late Modern English
Peter J. Grund, University of Kansas

Historical retention or 20th century revival? Canadian evidence for the rise of gotten in North America
Sali Tagliamonte, University of Toronto

Historical Folk Linguistics: Shakespeare & Elizabethan linguistic folk belief
Dennis R Preston, University of Kentucky

Historical sociolinguistics as a field and the North American Research Network in Historical Sociolinguistics (NARNiHS) as a professional support initiative
discussion

3:30-4:00 PM | Break; coffee available, HUB 250
4:00-5:15 PM | Plenary, Hub 250

Hyperstandardization and Its Ideological Tensions
Anne Curzan, the University of Michigan

reception to follow


Friday, May 20 | Husky Union Building (HUB)

8:15-8:45 AM | Coffee and pastries available, HUB 250
8:45-10:15 AM | Session 4
Session 4A | HUB 332 Session 4B | HUB 334

Roundtable: Dialect and Literature: Language Ideologies and Identity Performance
David West Brown, Carnegie Mellon University
Taryn Hakala, California State University Channel Islands
Starlina D. Rose, University of Sheffield

chair: Stefan Dollinger, University of British Columbia

Semantics meets Syntax: Diachronic study of tag questions
Fuyo Osawa, Hosei University

"They … practically live in canoes": The rise of a new downtoner in LModE
Laurel Brinton, University of British Columbia

The socio-pragmatics of intensifiers: Evidence from the Old Bailey Corpus
Claudia Claridge, University of Augsburg, Ewa Jonsson, Uppsala University, and Merja Kytö, Uppsala University

10:15-10:30 AM | Break; coffee available, HUB 250
10:30am-12:30 PM | Session 5
Session 5A | HUB 332
Teaching the Future of English: Pedagogy in the HEL Course
Session 5B | HUB 334

organizers: Felicia Jean Steele, The College of New Jersey; Melinda J. Menzer, Furman University

Perusall in the HEL Toolbox: Practical and Ethical Considerations
Moira Fitzgibbons, Marist College

Reading early English like a medieval person: HEL pedagogical strategies gleaned from Old English glosses, translations, and commentaries
Dylan Wilkerson, University of Toronto

HEL via Formal Grammar Instruction for Preservice K-12 Teachers and More
Matthieu Boyd, Fairleigh Dickinson University

"HEL for the future: Open Access Resources for the Informed User of the English Language"
Mary Dockray-Miller, Lesley University

chair: Michael Adams, Indiana University at Bloomington

"To be avoided by every correct Writer": George Harris’s Observations and the first English Usage Guide
Alexander Christensen, Kiersten Guymon, KaTrina Weyerman, Don Chapman, Brigham Young University

Early Prescriptivism: Prescriptive Discourse in England before 1700
Don Chapman, Brigham Young University

"Her Speech Betrayeth Her": The New Woman and Gendered Slang
Alycia Gilbert, University of Washington

12:30-1:30 PM | Lunch, HUB 250 (or on your own)
1:30-3:00 PM | Roundtable: the History of English in Cascadia
Stefan Dollinger, the University of British Columbia
Tami Hohn, the University of Washington
Betsy Evans, the University of Washington
Lorraine McConaghy, Museum of History and Industry
Jennifer Stone, University of Alaska Anchorage
Alicia Beckford Wassink, the University of Washington
3:00-3:30 PM | Break; coffee available, HUB 250
3:30-4:45 PM | Plenary, Hub 250

Historical trends in English sentence length and syntactic complexity
Mark Liberman, the University of Pennsylvania

reception to follow


Saturday, May 21 | Husky Union Building (HUB)

8:15-8:45 AM | Coffee and pastries available, HUB 340
8:45-10:15 AM | Session 6
Session 6A | HUB 332
Advocacy in HEL and HEL as Advocacy for the Humanities
Session 6B | HUB 334
Writing Studies I

organizers: K. Aaron Smith and Susan M. Kim, Illinois State University

Infectious Language: HEL Undergraduates Advocate for the Humanities
Tamara F. O’Callaghan, Northern Kentucky University

Confronting Linguistic and Racial Purity Ideologies in the History of the English Language Course
Melinda J. Menzer, Furman University

Defending the Importance of HEL in the Humanities Curriculum
K. Aaron Smith, Susan M. Kim, Pouya Vakili, Illinois State University

organizers: Chris C. Palmer, Kennesaw State University; Amanda Sladek, University of Nebraska at Kearney

History of Standard English and its Implication on Nonmainstream Students
Marwan Almuhaysh, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University/Ohio University

A Rationale and Strategy for History of English Language Projects in First-Year Composition
Joleen Hanson, University of Wisconsin-Stout

HEL, Translingualism, and the Composition Classroom: What the Norman Conquest Can Teach Us About Student Writing
Amanda Sladek, University of Nebraska at Kearney

10:15-10:30 AM | Break; coffee available, HUB 340
10:30am-12:00 PM | Session 7
Session 7A | HUB 332 Session 7B | HUB 334
Writing Studies II

chair: Caitlin Postal, University of Washington

Building a Language Model for Old English
Scott Kleinman, California State University, Northridge

William Morris’ Transhistorical Beowulf: Binding Linguistic Choices and Book Design and the Consequences of Transtemporal Reading Experiences
Francesca Colonnese, University of Washington

Scribal Errors in the English Recension of the Hêliand
Douglas Simms, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

organizers: Chris C. Palmer, Kennesaw State University; Amanda Sladek, University of Nebraska at Kearney

Incrementalism and the Rhetoric of Science
Michael J. Zerbe, York College of Pennsylvania

Historical Rhetorical Genre Theory
Lindsay Rose Russell, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

A Diachronic Study of Metadiscourse in Writing Prompts in First-Year Writing
Wen Xin, Syracuse University

12:00-1:00 PM | Lunch, HUB 340 (or on your own)
1:00-2:30 PM | Session 8
Session 8A | HUB 332 Session 8B | HUB 334
Writing Studies III

chair: Paul Remley, University of Washington

Discourse in the Old English Guthlac
Megan Hartman, University of Nebraska at Kearney

Gender, Identity, and Metricality in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tables
Charles X. Li, Central Washington University Chaucer & The Equatorie of the Planetis: Establishing authorship from an historical sociolinguistic perspective
Joseph Roy, American Society for Engineering Education & Bridget Drinka, University of Texas at San Antonio

organizers: Chris C. Palmer, Kennesaw State University; Amanda Sladek, University of Nebraska at Kearney

Writing with the Historical Thesaurus of English
Marc Alexander, Fraser Dallachy, Andrew Struan, University of Glasgow

Teaching Dialect and Slang for Creative Writing
Mitch Olson and Chris C. Palmer, Kennesaw State University

Using Constructed Languages to Teach Writing Concepts
Danielle Williams, Arizona State University

Writing Studies discussion

2:30-3:00 PM | Break; coffee available, HUB 340
3:00-4:15 PM | Plenary, Hub 334

The History of English and the Changing Face of Philology: Canonical, National, "Glocal"
Haruko Momma, New York University

4:15-4:45 PM | Business Meeting, HUB 334
6:30 PM | Conference Dinner