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Developmental Disabilities

Course | EdLPS 539

History Of Urban Education

In this course we take a close at how racism, class divisions, real estate interests, ideas of citizenship, notions of normalcy, the quest for social mobility, and a range of government policies, have shaped the content, meaning, and social distribution of education in cities historically. Recently, scholars in a number of fields, including history, geography, urban studies, sociology, law, education, and critical theory have taken up this topic, with particular attention to the processes by which “urban” and “suburban” places have been defined and to the role that schools have played in those processes. At the same time, scholars working in the traditions of cultural and intellectual history have looked at discourse within classrooms and communities to discover how educators and leaders have intentionally shaped the meaning of race, culture, education and citizenship in different places. To understand how these dynamics intersected, we analyze comparative cases, including Matthew Lassiter's now classic study of three southern U.S. cities, The Silent Majority, Zoe Burkholder's influential Color in the Classroom, and studies of African American, Native American, Latino, White, and Asian American educational experience and activism in the North, South, and West. The course runs as a project in collective, nested inquiry. Part way through the course, students select to participate in a "Special Interest Group" (SIGS) organized around specific topics and questions. Together, members of each group analyze comparative cases around those questions.

Scholar

Joe Lott

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Scholar

Marge Plecki

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Scholar

Megan Bang

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Scholar

Meredith I. Honig

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Scholar

Michael Knapp

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Scholar

Steve Fink

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