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March 13, 2019

Pedestrian deaths are rising, but not in Seattle. Here’s why.

The beginning of the Burke-Gilman Trail

Across the U.S., pedestrian fatalities are increasing, according to a recent report. That’s often due to distracted drivers and pedestrians looking at their phones. Some are high or drunk, and increasingly, they’re driving heavy, taller SUVs that strike victims at chest height, where they can do more harm. But Seattle has bucked the trend, thanks…


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March 7, 2019

A new laser-toting disaster lab aims to save lives by saving data

The 2016 flooding devastated many communities in Louisiana, including Baton Rouge pictured here.

Inside a small, rectangular room at the University of Washington is a series of shelves filled with more than 300 high-tech tools. There’s a collection of drones, cameras, and tablets, and even a mobile EEG kit, able to measure a brain’s electrical activity and detect stress levels in disaster victims. Each one has been meticulously…


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March 6, 2019

New study shows how exposure to air pollution early in life may lead to autism

Firefighters extinguish a fire

Exposure to air pollution, particularly traffic-related air pollution, has previously been linked to autism spectrum disorder in epidemiological studies. And now a new animal study from the University of Washington School of Public Health describes a possible mechanism by which this relationship might occur. The study was published Jan. 16 in the journal Brain, Behavior and Immunity. In…


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February 28, 2019

Seattle’s minimum-wage hikes increased childcare facilities’ labor costs but not supermarket prices, new UW studies find

grocery store

Jennifer Otten, Associate Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health Services, was lead author on a study that found that childcare facilities’ labor costs increased after the wage hikes. She looked at payroll data from 2014 and 2016 for about 200 businesses, surveyed 41 childcare directors three times, and interviewed 15 directors. Otten found that more than half…


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February 27, 2019

Evictions, rent spikes contribute to Washington’s homelessness crisis, study finds

Nicklesville Homeless Encampment Seattle

With rent spikes and the decline of affordable housing, a team of University of Washington researchers are finding that evictions are contributing to the rise in homelessness across Washington state. Tim Thomas is the Principal Investigator of the study, and post-doctoral fellow at the UW eScience Institute. Now they’ve created a “living document” that shows eviction rates…


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February 22, 2019

With climate change, what will your city’s weather feel like in 60 years?

An iceberg floats past an ice shelf in the North Atlantic.

Within your child or grandchild’s lifetime, the weather may be dramatically different because of climate change. The past five years have already been the hottest on record for our planet, but based on new projections published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications, it’s going to get a lot hotter for the 250 million people living in…


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February 15, 2019

How Seattle’s 1919 General Strike Ignited America’s Labor Movement

Seattle - Occidental and Yesler

On February 6, 1919, 65,000 union workers in Seattle walked off the job. On that Wednesday morning, barbers, newsboys, ice wagon drivers, stereotypers, electrical utility workers, and bill posters didn’t show up for work, a demonstration of solidarity with shipyard workers who had already been striking for two weeks in pursuit of higher wages. The…


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February 13, 2019

Two new studies published about the Seattle minimum wage ordinance

grocery store

University of Washington researchers continue to study the impact of the 2014 Seattle minimum wage ordinance. An interdisciplinary team of faculty and graduate students who have tracked various industries since the ordinance’s implementation just published two new studies: These papers take a closer look at the effects on child care businesses and on food prices…


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February 7, 2019

Homeowners keep building walls around Puget Sound. Biologists are taking out more

sea wall

Puget Sound has started getting healthier, at least by one measure: A little less of its shoreline is buried under walls of concrete and rock. Biologists have long pointed to seawalls, bulkheads and other protective structures known as “shoreline armoring” as a major environmental problem for Puget Sound. More than 660 miles, or about 29…


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February 6, 2019

Salad, soda and socioeconomic status: Mapping a social determinant of health in Seattle

Salad and soda can

Seattle residents who live in waterfront neighborhoods tend to have healthier diets compared to those who live along Interstate-5 and Aurora Avenue, according to new research on social disparities from the University of Washington School of Public Health. The study used local data to model food consumption patterns by city block. Weekly servings of salad and soda…


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Urban@UW shares stories of urban research, teaching, and engagement by the University of Washington community through original publication and amplification of externally published articles, in order to bring visibility to the great work across the university. For communications inquiries, please email urbanuw@uw.edu

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