Chaos in the Microbiome

Posted 1 year ago by Jesse Zaneveld

School(s) : STEM, Pre-Major Program
Primary PI Name : Jesse Zaneveld
Email : zaneveld@uw.edu
Phone : 425-352-3789
Project/Faculty Website : https://www.uwb.edu/biological-sciences/faculty/biology/jzaneveld
Research Location : UW Bothell
Project Goals : Coral reef are hotspots of biodiversity that feed billions of people, and shelter coastal communities against hurricanes. The coral animals that build these reefs have diversified longer than flowering plants, but are threatened by overfishing, nutrient pollution and climate change. Many of these stressors make corals more vulnerable to disease. We study the symbiotic microbial communities in an don corals to understand their role in coral health and disease.
Student Qualifications : First year and Sophomores welcome!
Student Outcomes : -Analyze an unprecedented global microbial DNA sequence dataset -Inform efforts to conserve coral reefs and manage coral disease -Join global collaborative network tackling a challenging scientific problem
Biology, ecology, environmental science

  • School(s) : Nursing and Health Studies, STEM, Pre-Major Program
  • Primary PI Name : Jesse Zaneveld
  • Interested? Contact Faculty Researcher by Email : zaneveld@uw.edu
  • Phone : 425-352-3789
  • Project/Faculty Website : https://www.uwb.edu/biological-sciences/faculty/biology/jzaneveld
  • Research Location : UW Bothell
  • Project Goals : Our bodies, and the bodies of other animals and plants, are home to an immense diversity of microorganisms. Normally, many of these are beneficial. However, some stressors destabilize host-microbe relationships. We are exploring cases in which stress of disease increases randomness in a microbial community. We are currently testing multiple human (e.g. HIV/AIDs, obesity, IBD, severe burns) and animal (heat-stressed corals, amphibian chytridosis, SIV, FIV) datasets to see when these effects do or don’t occur. We are also developing new mathematical models and computational tools to let researchers test these patterns in their own data.
  • Student Outcomes : -Test microbial DNA sequence datasets from humans and animals to establish which types of stress and disease increase randomness in the microbiome vs. which induce predictable changes -Explore the implications of these findings for microbial ecology and experimental design using new simulation models -Contribute to the development of new methods for studying the microbiome.
  • Number of Student Positions Available : 2