Spring 2012


HUM 595A/GWSS 590

Special Topics: Women Who Rock Digital Scholarship, Part II

Instructor: Angelica Macklin

Mondays, 3:30 – 5:20
3 Credits
Time Schedule

This course, aligned with the Women Who Rock Research Project, is designed to prepare graduate and undergraduate students to edit digital stories and prepare oral histories for the UW Libraries Women Who Rock Oral History Digital Archive using pre-recorded footage of people who have made significant contributions toward cultural practice through music scenes, public scholarship, and social justice work. Students will review, organize, transcribe, edit, and curate oral histories and create short digital stories for public broadcast, their own scholarly pursuits, and future Women Who Rock scholarship. By permission of the instructor: amacklin@uw.edu.

Angelica Macklin is a filmmaker, a recent graduate of the Master of Arts in Cultural Studies program at the University of Washington, Bothell, and affiliate faculty in their Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences program. Her research interests focus on the role media production can play in shaping social movements.

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HUM 595B

Indigenous Encounters: Knowledge Production, Activism, Decolonization

Instructors:

  • Benjamin Gardner (Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, UW Bothell)
  • José Antonio Lucero (Jackson School of International Studies, UW Seattle)

Course Meeting Dates and Times:

  • Friday, April 13, 10:00 am -1:00 pm, Communications 202
  • Friday, April 27 10:00 am -1:00 pm, Communications 202
  • Friday, May 4,   9:30 am- 11:30 am TBD
  • Saturday, May 5, 10:00 am -1:00 pm, Communications 202

1 Credit (C/NC)
Flyer
Time Schedule

 
Coordinated with a lecture and workshop by visiting Kanaka Maoli scholar J. Kehaulani Kauanui (American Studies and Anthropology, Wesleyan University), this seminar explores the field of indigenous politics with an explicit focus on the work of Indigenous scholars who have challenged conventional understandings of sovereignty, Indigeneity, and academic scholarship. Participants will engage with the broad theoretical and political challenges that have emerged with new approaches in Native Studies as an interdisciplinary and global field of knowledge-production and learn how “indigeneity” works as an analytic, historical practice, and a political position.

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HUM 595C

Feminisms, Institutions, and Alliances: a Microseminar with Richa Nagar

Instructors:

  • Amanda Swarr (Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies)
  • Richa Nagar (Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies, University of Minnesota)

Course Meeting Dates and Times:

  • Wednesday, May 16, 3:30-5:30 pm, Communications 226
  • Thursday, May 24, 6:00-8:00 pm, Smith 409
  • Friday, May 25, 3:30-4:30 pm, Smith 304
  • Wednesday, May 30, 3:30-5:30 pm, Communications 202

1 Credit (C/NC)
Flyer
Time Schedule

This microseminar will explore the transnational feminist analyses, methodologies, storytelling, research ethics and politics, and alliance building of Richa Nagar. For the past three decades, Nagar’s research, creative writing, and organizing work has focused on understanding the politics and processes of NGO work and women’s empowerment projects as well as ways in which multiple hierarchies associated with these can be interrupted through collaborative knowledge production and dissemination across the borders of North/South, academia/activism, and Awadhi/Hindustani/English.

Through close reading of Nagar’s scholarship, as well as a workshop with and public lecture by Nagar, seminar participants will become familiar with diverse feminist methodologies, the possibilities and pitfalls of alliance work, and how to relate these ideas to their own graduate work in oral and written forms.

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HUM 597A

Performance Theory, Methods, and Politics: A Microseminar with Diana Taylor

Instructors:

  • Cynthia Steele (Comparative Literature)
  • Diana Taylor (Performance Studies and Spanish, New York University)

Course Meeting Dates and Times:

  • Tuesday, May 8, 3:30-5:30 pm, CMU 202
  • Monday, May 14, 3:30-5:30 pm, CMU 202
  • Tuesday, May 15, 7:00 pm KNE 220
  • Wednesday, May 16, 3:30-5:30 pm, CMU 202
  • Tuesday, May 22, 3:30-5:30 pm CMU 202

1 Credit (C/NC)
Flyer
Time Schedule
 

This microseminar, held in conjunction with Taylor’s week-long residency as Distinguished Katz Lecturer, provides a focused study of Taylor’s approach to performance theory and methodology as it informs the study of performance and politics. Participants will read from Taylor’s seminal work and current research, and attend her Katz lecture, “Taking to the Streets: Arts and Activism in the Americas,” as part of the seminar sequence.

Diana Taylor is University Professor and Professor of Performance Studies and Spanish at New York University. She received her doctorate in Comparative Literature from the University of Washington. Taylor is the author of The Archive and the Repertoire: Performing Cultural Memory in the Americas (2003), Disappearing Acts: Spectacles of Gender and Nationalism in Argentina’s ‘Dirty War’ (1997), and Theatre of Crisis: Drama and Politics in Latin America (1991). She is also founding Director of NYU’s Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, a collaborative, multilingual and interdisciplinary network of institutions, artists, scholars, and activists throughout the Americas.

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BCULST 593

Rethinking Marxism

Instructor: S. Charusheela (Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, UW Bothell)

Wednesdays, 5:45-10:00 PM, UW Bothell campus (UW1-051)
5 Credits

Time Schedule 
Flyer

This course approaches Marxism as it is constituted through diverse knowledge projects that self-consciously identify the writings of Karl Marx as a source.  We will spend the first two-thirds of the quarter reading Marx’s writings, starting with Young Marx and working our way through to the Later Marx of Capital.  Along the way, we will pick out key themes in Marx’s writings that have become central to contemporary scholarship in a variety of fields, as a way to ground the different traditions of Marxian thought.  The last third of the quarter will provide an introduction to key scholarly trajectories within contemporary Marxian thought. 

Through a combination of seminar discussion and writing, along with intensive out-of-class mentoring, students will develop facility with the approaches and vocabularies of Marxian scholarly traditions and evolve their own research agendas.  No background is necessary, just a willingness to read extensively, ask questions, and critically engage with the course materials.

In Autumn 2012, the University of Washington will host a conference with the editorial board of Rethinking Marxism.  Because the instructor currently serves as the journal’s editor, students will have the opportunity to develop their course papers for conference presentation with support from editorial board members.

S. Charusheela (Charu) is Associate Professor of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences at University of Washington, Bothell, where her research and teaching interests focus on gender, political economy, globalization and development. Charu is the Editor of Rethinking Marxism, and serves on the Executive Committee of the Cultural Studies Association (U.S.).

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