2011-2012 HASTAC Scholar Profiles

This year's HASTAC scholars were chosen to represent UW to the HASTAC community for their involvement in two projects, Keywords in Video Game Studies and Women Who Rock.


Edmund Chang is a Ph.D. Candidate in English at the University of Washington, Seattle. Hi research and teaching interests include technoculture, digital humanities, cultural studies, queer theory, literature, video games, role-playing games, and popular culture.  His dissertation, “Technoqueer: Re/con/figuring Posthuman Embodiment and Subjectivity,” analyzes the technological mediation of bodies and subjectivity via literature, cyberpunk, and video games, focusing on how cyberspace and body modification technology provides alternative and radical articulations of sexuality, gender, and race.  He received the 2009 UW Excellence in Teaching Award and the AAC&U’s 2011 K. Patricia Cross Future Leaders Award.

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Theresa Horstman is a doctoral student in Learning Sciences at the University of Washington. In her master's thesis, she focused on an analysis of video game and e-learning design methodologies. She’s currently looking at the creative process as it relates to design and learning in virtual environments and at the same time, using socio-cultural theories as a conceptual lens for understanding design in virtual environments and games.

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Natascha Karlove is a PhD Candidate in Information Science at the University of Washington Information School, who studies how teams of online game players distinguish cues to false information (misinformation) from cues to misleading information (disinformation). As a gamer herself, she loves researching player practices around games, and how they transform it.

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Sarah Kremen-Hicks is interested in the intersection of Victorian literature and aesthetics and digital media, both in terms of the presentation of existing media and possibilities of adaptation and transmediation afforded by emerging technologies.

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Terry Schenold is a Ph.D. candidate in English writing whose dissertation, “Reading and Reflection in the Novel and New Media,” includes an exploration of digital roleplaying games as the best potential analog to literary media, as instruments for reflection, within the emerging digital media ecology. He has taught several classes on digital games, most notably the seminar “Poetics of Play in Digital Roleplaying Games.” Specific research interests include ergodicity and narrative, temporality, sources of “immersion,” and comparative configurations of imaginative work in different game media.

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