Course Archives

  • Honors 210 A: Modern Japan Through its Cinema (VLPA)
    SLN 11557 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Ted Mack (Asian Languages and Literature)
    tmack@u.washington.edu
    MTuWThF
    1:10-3:20
    SAV 168
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Arts & Humanities

    B Term ONLY

    This course will be an introduction to modern Japan through its cinema, in which we will use a wide variety of twentieth-century films to discuss a wide variety of topics. Not only will be viewing films in a variety of genres -- documentary, drama, comedy, science fiction, historical, supernatural, avant-garde, and animation -- we will also be discussing topics ranging from the nature of art to the moral questions of nuclear modernity. Although our discussions will be sensitive to the specific nature of film as an expressive medium, we will consider the topics of art, history, society, war, propaganda, tradition, and morality.

    More information at http://faculty.washington.edu/tmack/1011/as210.html

  • Honors 230 A: Theories of Justice (I&S)
    SLN 11558 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Louis Wolcher (Law School)
    Office: 335 William H. Gates Hall, Box 353020
    Phone: (206) 543-0600
    wolcher@u.washington.edu
    MTuWTh
    1:10-3:20
    SMI 307
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 35 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Social Science

    A Term ONLY

    What is justice? Is it possible for a person to know that he or she is acting justly? What criteria must a society fulfill in order to be considered just, or at least reasonably just? Does justice necessarily proceed from the so-called "social contract"? And what is the relation between justice and law? Do we have a moral duty to obey the laws of a just state, and, conversely, to disobey the laws of an unjust state? When it comes to punishing wrongdoers who have both violated the law and acted unjustly, is vengeance the same as justice? This class considers these and other kindred questions by means of a close reading of many of the answers (both ancient and modern) that Western thinkers have given to them. The goal is to make possible critical thought and informed debate about the important theme of justice in public and private life.

A unit within Undergraduate Academic Affairs
211 Mary Gates Hall : Box 352800 : Seattle, WA 98195-2800
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