Amsterdam 2014

Amsterdam and Seattle: Urban Social Control in Comparative Perspective

Amsterdam 2014 poster

Sponsoring Units:  Honors Program (Undergraduate Academic Affairs) and Law, Societies, and Justice

Program Dates: June 23 - July 23 (Summer A Term)

The 6th Honors in Amsterdam Program, established in 2006 in partnership with the University of Amsterdam

15 credits (onsite in Amsterdam summer = 12 combined with a 3 credit spring prep seminar in Seattle)

This program will satisfy the following 15 credits of Honors core requirements (and/or LSJ core requirements, exclusive of departmental honors requirements):

CourseCreditsCredit Type
Honors 230 or LSJ 495 5 Honors Social Science (taken in summer while abroad)
Honors 230 or LSJ 495 5 Honors Social Science (taken in summer while abroad)
Honors 397 or LSJ 495 2 Honors Social Science (taken in summer while abroad)
Honors 397 or LSJ 495 3 Honors Social Science (taken in spring before departure)

(Note: The two Honors 397 classes will combine to satisfy one five credit Honors Social Science course requirement. Because Interdisciplinary and College Honors only require one Honors Social Science core course, the additional courses will fall into your "Any Additional Three" Honors course requirements.)

Information Sessions

  • Monday, Dec. 2 at 3 p.m.
  • Wed., Dec. 4 at 1 p.m.
  • Wed., January 15 at 1 p.m.
  • Tuesday, Jan 21 at 1 p.m.

About the Program

Amsterdam and Seattle: Urban Social Control in Comparative Perspective

Given their density and heterogeneity, cities are surprisingly ordered places. The goal of this program is to understand how and why this happens, to understand the social processes through which order is created in urban areas. This will be accomplished through an explicitly comparative process.  We will compare and contrast the key ordering processes in two cities, Seattle and Amsterdam.

This comparison will be especially instructive because the United States and the Netherlands approach issues of order in distinct ways.  Part of this stems from differing understandings of how criminal behavior should best be understood and regulated.  Part of it also stems from differing understandings of the importance of such social institutions as the state and the social welfare assistance it can provide.  A central component of the students’ work in this course will be extensive field projects in both Seattle and Amsterdam that will enable them to describe and analyze social ordering mechanisms in significant and comparative detail.

Students enrolled in this course will take a 3 credit seminar during spring quarter.  The preparatory seminar will: help students understand key ordering dynamics in cities; survey key readings that describe and analyze differences between the Netherlands and the United States; help students to develop skills in field research; and enable students opportunities to do fieldwork in Seattle, to use as a basis for comparison after they acquire their Amsterdam field data.

Program Credit


Students will receive 15 credits of Honors core credits (I&S credits) -- 12 summer credits and 3 spring seminar credits.  Participating graduate students will coordinate the allocation of credits with their advisers. The culmination of this study will be student presentations at the University of Amsterdam.

Alternative credit may be available to students not currently enrolled in the Honors Program.  Alternative credit options must be arranged in advance with your departmental adviser.

Course Details

Spring 2014

Preparation for Amsterdam Study Abroad
Honors 397 or LSJ 495 (I&S)- 3 credits
Students enrolled in this course are required to enroll in a preparatory seminar during spring quarter. The seminar will: help students understand key ordering dynamics in cities; survey key readings that describe and analyze differences between the Netherlands and the United States; help students to develop skills in field research; and enable students opportunities to do fieldwork in Seattle, to use as a basis for comparison after they acquire their Amsterdam field data.

Summer Quarter

Amsterdam and Seattle: Urban Social Control in Comparative Perspective
Honors 230 or LSJ 495 (Honors Core and I&S)- 10 credits
Given their density and heterogeneity, cities are surprisingly ordered places. The goal of this course is to understand how and why this happens, to understand the social processes through which order is created in urban areas. This will be accomplished through an explicitly comparative process.  We will compare and contrast the key ordering processes in two cities, Seattle and Amsterdam.  This comparison will be especially instructive because the United States and the Netherlands approach issues of order in distinct ways.  Part of this stems from differing understandings of how criminal behavior should best be understood and regulated.  Part of it also stems from differing understandings of the importance of such social institutions as the state and the social welfare assistance it can provide.

Comparative Field Research
Honors 397 (I&S) or LSJ 495 (I&S)- 2 credits
A central component of the students’ work in this course will be extensive field projects in both Seattle and Amsterdam that will enable them to describe and analyze social ordering mechanisms in significant and comparative

Program Staff

Director

Steve Herbert
Professor, Geography/Law, Societies, and Justice; Director Law, Societies, and Justice
skherb@uw.edu
My work is focused on the regulation of space, largely through the work of law and of the uniformed police. All of my projects are deeply qualitative, and use ethnography and interviews to probe the deeper processes and meanings that structure social life. My interest in law and social control is underscored by my joint appointment in the Law, Societies, and Justice Program , an interdisciplinary undergraduate program whose faculty span the gamut of the social sciences. Indeed, interdisciplinary inquiry is a cornerstone of my approach to research and teaching.  Read more: http://depts.washington.edu/geog/people/herbert_index.htm

Co-director

Elyse Gordon
Geography, Doctoral Student
egordon4@uw.edu

I am an urban political geographer interested in inequalities, young people and digital technology. Specifically, I am interested in the ways that ‘empowerment’ programs are mobilized, deployed and used as way to shape the lived experiences of urban youth. My dissertation work will trace the moving parts of ‘empowerment’: how it circulates, what meaning it holds to different actors, and what work it does in shaping material and discursive experiences of poverty. Within this project, I am interested in how technology is used as a tool of ‘empowerment’, particularly the discursive tensions between ‘digital divides’ and ‘digital natives’.

Site Partner

Mirjam Schieveld
General Manager
University of Amsterdam's Graduate School of Social Sciences Summer Institute

Mirjam Schieveld studied cultural anthropology at the Universiteit van Amsterdam. She is co founder and programme director of the Summer Institute on Sexuality, Culture and Society as well as the Summer Institute on Addiction. Research interests include: sex education, commercial sex, and addiction. She taught for IES a course on Sexuality and Gender in the Context of Amsterdam and has given various guest lectures in the field of social problems in the Netherlands. She is also the general manager of the Summer programmes of the Graduate School of Social Sciences.

Program Cost

Program cost is approximately $4,100 per student (this amount includes tuition, lodging, classroom and lab fees, some group meals, admission to all museums and exhibits, excursions, partial ground transportation, and conference fees). Course fee does not include Study Abroad fee ($300), airfare ($1,000-$1,600 round trip, depending on when and where you buy your ticket), food (about $30-50 per day), and personal spending money.

Financial Aid

Students may use their regular financial aid and scholarship funds for study abroad. The exception is any scholarship in the form of a tuition waiver. Tuition waivers cannot be used to pay study abroad program fees. Check with the Office of Student Financial Aid in Schmitz Hall for more information.

Funding opportunities are available through the Global Opportunities Program (Go! and Fritz Scholarships).  The Office of International Programs and Exchanges maintains a funding opportunities list.

For information on the Guaranteed Education Tuition Program visit:
GET Program Information
and for Financial Aid Questions:
Financial Aid Information

The Honors Program students may also apply for any of the Honors Program Scholarships for Continuing Students:
http://depts.washington.edu/uwhonors/scholarships/current/

The Study Abroad Refund Policy details out the process for withdrawal.

Housing

Housing is provided by the University of Amsterdam system. UvA is spread out across the city (there is no ONE main building site) and housing is also spread out, although the majority of the housing is located in the center of the city. GSSS will select the best possible housing available for the students through the system.  The students may not be all at one site; however, they will all be centrally located.  The classrooms are located in one building Kloveniersburgwal, in the city centre (close to the Munt).

Travel

To Amsterdam

Amsterdam is one of Europe's most progressive and oldest cities. It is easily accessible by all  the major airlines (many direct flights are offered). Participants are responsible for making their own travel arrangements to Amsterdam. You may wish to explore budget fares offered on discount search websites as well as STA and Council Travel Offices in Seattle. Direct flights to Amsterdam are available through the following airlines:
Delta, KLM, Icelandair

Within Amsterdam

Students and instructors will go on several day-excursions. Students will also have opportunities to travel on their own for two or three day-jaunts. Independent travel is not covered by the program fee.

All participants must have a passport valid for the duration of the program. It may take as long as six weeks to obtain or renew a passport.

Application Process

This program is designed for undergraduate students who possess a strong interest in the subject matter and who are excited about conducting field research, both in Seattle and in Amsterdam.  Preference will be given to students in the University Honors Program and to majors in Law, Societies, and Justice.

Acceptance to the program will be based on application materials, demonstration of academic excellence, one-on-one interview with the program directors, and motivation to challenge themselves intellectually across academic disciplines and cultures. As representatives of the University of Washington students are expected to behave with respect and appropriate cultural awareness and openness to learn. Learning from members of the host culture, peers, and instructors is expected of all participants.    

For more information

Steve Herbert, Program Director
skherb@uw.edu

Julie Villegas, Honors Program International Programs Lead
villegas@uw.edu

A unit within Undergraduate Academic Affairs
211 Mary Gates Hall : Box 352800 : Seattle, WA 98195-2800
206.543.7444 : 206.543.6469 FAX
uwhonors@uw.edu
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