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2017 Honors in Rome

Mediterranean Crossings-In History and Today

Rome Summer 2017 mini poster

Locations: Rome, Naples, and Venice
Sponsoring Unit: Honors Program, Undergraduate Academic Affairs
Program Dates: June 20 – July 21, 2017 (Summer A term)

This program will award the following 15 credits of Honors core requirements:

Course Credits Credit Type
HONORS 384 5 Honors Interdisciplinary (VLPA & I&S) "W"
HONORS 233 5 Honors Social Science (I&S) "W"
HONORS 384
HONORS 384
3
2
Honors Interdisciplinary (VLPA and I&S) "W"
These two courses will be combined into one 5-credit course on your transcript

Information Sessions

  • January 10, 3:30 MGH 206

About the Program

Learn about contemporary issues facing the city of Rome as contextualized by its ancient past. This program strives to bridge the struggles of immigrant communities settling in Europe with the historical past of one of the world’s oldest cities.

For much of our recorded history the Mediterranean Sea functioned to unite the lands that surrounded it. People, cultures, and empires in southern Europe, western Asia, and North Africa crossed this sea continuously in many directions; interacted with, borrowed from, and strengthened each other. In this course we explore the causes and consequences of these movements across the Mediterranean.  We will start with a historical introduction and then focus on contemporary migrations. Through readings, discussions, films, guest lecturers, and field trips students will learn about the diverse types of migration present in the new Europe today (refugees, asylum seekers, and labor migrants from all over the world). Immigrant integration and multiculturalism with particular attention to ethnic, national, gender, and religious differences will be discussed, as will increasing efforts to control migration into Europe and the EU. Students will work on team projects, in consultation with the professors, throughout the course and present their research during the last week of the Program.
 
The program is conducted at the Palazzo Pio, the University of Washington's Rome Center, located in the historic center of the city. The palazzo, a fully remodeled seventeenth-century structure that sits on the foundations of the ancient theater of Pompey (55 B.C.), rises next to the Campo de' Fiori, one of Rome's favorite locales, a bustling open market during the day and lively social venue at night.

The Program will include excursions to main historical sites of the city with instruction in both ancient and contemporary art in Rome and the surrounding area. A sampling of excursions may include: the Pantheon, Vatican City, the Ara Pacis and the EUR.  Rome is centrally located and the class will take advantage of excursions to Naples and Venice.
 
The UW's Rome Center will provide classrooms, library use, and a computer lab as well as access to support staff and events such as film night, cooking classes and lectures by local guest speakers.

Students will receive 15 credits of Honors core credits -- 13 summer credits and 2 spring seminar credits.  Participating graduate students will coordinate the allocation of credits with their advisers.

Alternative credit may be available to students not currently enrolled in the Honors Program.  Alternative credit options must be arranged in advance with your departmental adviser.

Program Credit / Course Descriptions

Prep Seminar: Honors Foreign Study

HONORS 384 (I&S and VLPA/Interdisciplinary) - 2 credits

Students accepted to the program are required to enroll in a 2 credit preparatory course during spring quarter.  Seminar schedule TBA. These credits will be joined with the 3 credits of Honors 243 to allow for 5 credits of Honors core (Interdisciplinary). These credits will be reflected on student transcripts once the program has ended and grades submitted.

Tracing the History and Power of the Image: Ancient to Modern Roman Art

HONORS 384 (VLPA and I&S) - Honors Interdisciplinary - 3 Credits

This course will be structured around visits to the major art and architectural sites of Rome. Students will examine the evolution in Roman visual culture and identify the common connecting threads of this rich historical location. Recent art historical readings and on-site discussions will facilitate this journey through the city's past from Ancient Imperial Rome to 20th century Fascism.
Learning Goals

  • Gain understanding of major art and architectural sites of Rome.
  • Integrate learning of Ancient and Modern Roman Art into major topics of the course.
  • Gain an understanding of art history research methodologies for program research projects.

“Mediterranean Crossings In History and Today”

HONORS 233 (I&S) - Honors Social Science - 5 Credits

For much of our recorded history the Mediterranean Sea functioned to unite the lands that surrounded it. People, cultures, and empires in southern Europe, western Asia, and North Africa crossed this sea continuously in many directions; interacted with, borrowed from, and strengthened each other. In this course we explore the causes and consequences of these movements across the Mediterranean.  We will start with a historical introduction and then focus on contemporary migrations. Through readings, discussions, films, guest lecturers, and field trips students will learn about the diverse types of migration present in the new Europe today (refugees, asylum seekers, and labor migrants from all over the world). Immigrant integration and multiculturalism with particular attention to ethnic, national, gender, and religious differences will be discussed, as will increasing efforts to control migration into Europe and the EU.
 
Learning Goals

  • Learn about migration patterns and consequences
  • Gain historical and contemporary foundation
  • Compare migration patterns globally
  • Integrate ethnic, national, gender, and religious differences and the complexities of immigration policies in Europe and EU.   

Research in the City: faculty supervised projects

HONORS 384 (VLPA/I&S) - Honors Interdisciplinary - 5 Credits

Students will work on team projects, in consultation and direction with the professors, throughout the course and present their research during the last week of the Program.

Learning Goals

  • Learn social science and humanities research methods
  • Deepen research skills in international context working in small groups and individually  

Program Leadership

Director

Professor Resat Kasaba, Jackson School of International Studies, researches and publishes on the Ottoman Empire, Middle East, and Turkey focusing on economic history, state-society relations, migration, ethnicity and nationalism, modernity and urban history.  He has also been doing research on education in the formation of modern Turkish identity in the twentieth century.
kasaba@uw.edu
More:  https://jsis.washington.edu/people/resat-kasaba/

Director

Professor Kathie Friedman, Jackson School of International Studies, Professor Friedman, is Associate Professor at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and the Department of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Washington. Her main area of study and research has been comparative forced migrations and immigration, particularly to the United States and the EU, with a focus on ethnic and political incorporation.
friedman@uw.edu
More: https://jsis.washington.edu/people/kathie-friedman/

Coordinator and art history instructor, Lauren Easterling, Masters in progress in Art History and Associate Director of the UW’s Study Abroad Office, has taught courses in Rome and has extensive knowledge of the Rome Center, the city of Rome, and, more broadly, the Italian language and culture.  She served as the Rome Center intern during the last year of her undergraduate degree and has twice taught with the Honors Rome Program.

Coordinator and art history/literature instructor, Arendt Speser earned his B.A. in Philosophy from Haverford College, returning home to the Pacific Northwest for a Ph.D. in English Literature and Language from the University of Washington, with a Certificate in Textual Studies. Arendt has been a TA and program coordinator for several programs in Rome and has taught with the Honors Rome Program last summer (2016).

Program Expenses

Estimated Program Fee: $5,300 (students do not pay tuition; program fee and concurrent enrollment fee only)

Average Airplane Ticket: $1,700

Daily out of pocket food costs (approx): $40

Payment Schedule:

Program fees will be posted to your MyUW student account and can be paid the same way that you pay tuition and other fees. Check your MyUW Account periodically for due dates.

Payment Type Payment Amount Payment Due Date
Non-Refundable UW Study Abroad Fee $350 July 7, 2017
Program Fee Balance $5,300 July 7, 2017
TOTAL FEES CHARGED $5,650 -

Making the program affordable

The Honors Program is passionate about study abroad and the incredible impact it can have on a student’s life.  An education grounded in a global context provides life long skills and lifelong memories. Studying abroad deepens study at home and provides a foundation for expanded reflection and self-growth, all core tenants of the Honors Program. We want everyone to experience study abroad. Don’t assume you can’t afford to study outside of the U.S. There are many funding opportunities to support your study abroad plans. Here are resources to help you get started on your global adventures!

Honors Program Scholarships

The Honors Program offers a number of scholarships for current Honors Program students. These scholarship funds may be used for UW approved study abroad programs or exchanges. Students may apply beginning in January (deadline is April 1).

Study Abroad Scholarships at UW

The UW offers several scholarships to support students interested in studying abroad whether through a faculty led program or an exchange program. A few opportunities include GO! and Fritz.

Visit the The Center for Experiential Learning and Diversity’s Global Opportunities website to learn about more scholarship opportunities.

The Gilman Scholarship Program offers awards for undergraduate study abroad and was established by the International Academic Opportunity Act of 2000. This scholarship provides awards for U.S. undergraduate students who are receiving Federal Pell Grant funding at a two-year or four-year college or university to participate in study abroad programs worldwide.

The summer 2017 Gilman International Scholarship application will open in mid-January 2017. Applications are due March 7, 2017 by 11:59pm (Central Time) and the certifying advisor deadline is March 14.

There are several outside resources for study abroad scholarships. Visit the UW’s Study Abroad Scholarship page for more information on scholarship support as well as information about GET funds and how you may apply the GET to your study abroad costs.

Using Financial Aid for Study Abroad

You may find more information about using your existing financial aid for study abroad on the Study Abroad Office’s Financial Aid webpage.  In general, all financial aid awarded may be used to support study abroad. Exceptions to this include tuition waivers, work-study awards, or scholarships that are specific about using the award for tuition (although there may be flexibility with some scholarships, please check with the financial aid office). Tuition waivers and work-study are never allowed for study abroad.

Revision of Need

You may also turn in a “Revision of Need” form with the Financial Aid Office if you have a FAFSA on file.  Once you are accepted to a study abroad program, visit the Study Abroad Office to obtain a budget for your study abroad program then complete the Revision Request and turn in both the budget and the revision request to the Office of Student Financial Aid in Schmitz Hall.

Visit the Financial Aid Study Abroad Funding Website for more information about applying for Summer quarter financial aid and for information about Exploration Seminar financial aid timeline (different than A or B term financial aid disbursement timeline).

You may also contact Honors Program Director Julie Villegas (villegas@uw.edu) if you would like to discuss additional resources and strategies.

Housing

UWRC will select standard housing in Rome (apartments close to Rome Center). Naples and Venice housing is selected on basis of hostel location and reputation of safety and high standards.

Application Process

This program is open to students in the Honors Program and also students across campus. The program is focused on recruiting a diverse group of students. Students of all majors are encouraged to apply and the program encourages freshmen-seniors. We anticipate a mix of freshmen-Seniors.

Selection to the program is competitive and acceptance into the program will be decided based on application materials, interviews, and student's demonstrated motivation to challenge themselves intellectually across academic disciplines and cultures and to work both individually and in groups.

Students in the Honors Program at the University of Washington (first priority to interdisciplinary honors, 2nd priority to departmental honors, then students outside of Honors).  These students are undergraduates at the UW from a variety of disciplines. The credits will count toward the Honors core. International Studies or Art History credits are possible per pre-approval of instructor and department.

Students will receive 15 credits total (13 credits in the summer and 2 credits of during spring quarter-prep seminar). Credits will fulfill Honors Core requirements.  Other credits may be applicable depending on individual research projects.

Alternative credit may be available to students outside of the Honors Program; this must be arranged in advance with departmental advisers.

Apply through the study abroad website
Deadline: February 15, 2017