Piling and burning is a common method for disposing of unwanted woody material.  Burning piles mitigates some of the concerns about environmental impacts, safety, and air quality, and is a viable alternative for treating a variety of areas.  Forest Service publications by Hardy (1996; PNW-GTR-364) and Wright et al. (2010; PNW-GTR-805) form the scientific basis for this calculator. Piled Fuels Biomass and Emissions Calculator

Last updated: 3/26/2014

1. DATA ENTRY MODE: MANUAL (USE ONLINE FORM) [Clear all/start over] [Help]
2. MEASUREMENT SYSTEM: English Metric ENGLISH METRIC
 3. Add Pile Group of Pile Type: Hand Machine

Describe this pile group:
Pile group name:  
Number of piles:  
Pile shape: Half sphere Paraboloid Half cylinder Half-frustum of cone Cone w/ rounded ends Half ellipsoid Irregular solid
 
W1:
W2:
H1:
H2:
L1:
L2:
Estimated pile
volume that is soil
:
  %
Packing ratio:
1. 10%: Piles with species content dominated by long-needled pines and/or broadleaf deciduous litter.
Mean diameters of large woody fuels < 10 inches.
2. 20%: Piles dominated by short-needled conifers. Mean diameters of large woody fuels < 10 inches.
3. 25%: Highly compacted, clean piles with large logs (diameters > 10 inches), especially those built with a crane or loader.
Pile composition:  
Primary species (wood density in lb/ft3):    % } percents must sum to 100%
Secondary species (wood density in lb/ft3):    %
Primary species (wood density in g/cm3):    % } must sum to 100%
Secondary species (wood density in g/cm3):    %
Pile quality: Clean (0% soil) Dirty (>0 - 10% soil) Very dirty (>10% soil)
Consumption:   % of piled material  (Note: Default for Consume = 90%, default for Washington DNR estimates = 85%)