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Crow icon indicates anecdotal reports or other data crow stories and anecdotes
Ring icon indicates a banded crow; placement of colors identifies unique crows banded crows
Tree icon indicates a nightly roost nighttime crow roosts
Directional arrow indicates flying direction during daily migration morning crow migrations
Directional arrow indicates flying direction during daily migration evening crow migrations
Nest icon indicates a nest crow nests
flickr icon indicates photo flickr photos

Zoom in to see more geographic detail. Click on the markers to see information about each sighting. Zoom to UW

Seattle Crows is now on Flickr! To see your crow pictures here, add them to the Seattle Crow Project Group Pool and make sure to geotag them with the location of the sighting! They'll be automagically added to the site.

@seattlecrows is now on Twitter! Just include the tag #seattlecrows in any twitter post about a crow sighting and it will be automagically updated onto the site.

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Sightings will not appear on map immediately, the map display will be periodically updated by the administrator

Welcome to the Seattle Crow Area Mapping Project!

Have you noticed hundreds of crows streaming through the shadows at dusk, or witnessed a crow harass a bald eagle? Crows are all around us and it seems that everyone has at least one story to tell. If you do too, here is your chance! I've created an interactive website enabling citizen scientists to share their observations of daily migrations, nightly roosts, banded crows, and more, with scientists and each other. The ultimate goals of the project are to involve more people in the process of scientific discovery and explore our cultural fascination with our corvid neighbors. During this process I hope we will build a useful database of crow happenings in the Puget Sound region and beyond. Sightings can be submitted and accessed from a map on the website, via Twitter, or by posting photos to Flickr. Help us collect data on these fascinating birds!

Published in Earthcare Northwest, the official newsletter of Seattle Audubon, site by Eric Collins (rec3141@gmail.com)

This project is sponsored by Prof. John Marzluff in the College of Forestry Resources at the University of Washington

Last sightings (view all)
2016-09-23
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I love corvids! Today I saw a behavior I've never seen before. I fed some chicken to them in addition to my usual nutty, seed-laden bread. I caw 3 times to call them because that's what they did when I first started putting out food. One crow picked up a piece of chicken, walked up our walkway, turned and *walked* down the street, then turned again into a neighbor's flower patch. He/she then *buried* the chicken. I didn't know our crows cached!
2016-09-22
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I have a family of three crows who visit frequently. I feed them dog food and the largest will appear if he's nearby when I call them ( a loud clicking sound). It took all summer and fledglings for them to become bold enough to sit 6 ft away waiting for food. Right now all three are looking scruffy as if mounting. Normal at this time of year?
2016-09-22
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I have a family of three crows who visit frequently. I feed them dog food and the largest will appear if he's nearby when I call them ( a loud clicking sound). It took all summer and fledglings for them to become bold enough to sit 6 ft away waiting for food. Right now all three are looking scruffy as if mounting. Normal at this time of year?
2016-09-19
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Foraging on Perrinville Creek delta. Also approx 300 CAGU and a few HEGU and GWGU.
2016-09-19
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Foraging on Perrinville Creek delta. Also approx 300 CAGU and a few HEGU and GWGU.
2016-09-18
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Hi! I’m a bit of a crow fan, actually I really love the NW Raven, but we don't get many in the Bremerton if at all. But getting back to the crows, I’ve noticed this year many dead carcasses on the roads ( 6 over the summer, before that I had never seen a crown on the road) around Bremerton. I also have noticed that a significant amount of them seem to be raggedy and lack the typical blue black sheen they usually have. Is there some sort of crow disease going around? There were three dead ones about ten feet from each other, in both directional lanes at this location on the Manette Bridge in late August.
2016-09-11
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Sunday evening about 6pm a crow got "stuck" hanging upside down on a branch of a large tree in my side yard. We watched thinking it would free itself but unfortunately it never did. This crow was still alive Monday morning, 9/12, but had died by the time I got home Monday evening. This morning I took pictures. The bird is too high for me to tell if it has a band and maybe got that caught, but it seems very odd that a bird would get caught like that in a tree and just from exhaustion.
2016-08-31
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One of the "white" bands may have been silver -- hard to tell. This bird is lame, with the toes on the right foot curled up. It puts weight on the balled up foot, but is limping because of this.
2016-08-31
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One of the "white" bands may have been silver -- hard to tell. This bird is lame, with the toes on the right foot curled up. It puts weight on the balled up foot, but is limping because of this.
2016-08-29
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Bird was struck by car on 8th Ave between Bell and Blanchard Streets. Body turned over to Animal Control
Last Tweets (view all)