Evolution and Ecological Impacts of an Evolutionary Novelty

Posted 1 year ago by Jeff Jensen

School(s) : STEM
Primary PI Name : Jeff Jensen
Email : jsjensen@uw.edu
Phone : 425-352-5310
Project/Faculty Website : https://jsjensenblog.wordpress.com/
Research Location : UW Bothell
Project Goals : Evolution and ecological impacts of an evolutionary novelty: Most fishes have a second set of jaws in their pharynx. In some fishes, such as the surf perches that are common along our coast, these pharyngeal jaws are highly specialized and diverse. This allows surfperch to exploit a wide variety of habitats and feed on a diversity of prey. For example, some surf perches feed on hard-shelled invertebrates such as snails. Their pharyngeal jaws allow them to crush snails and give them a food source few other fish can exploit. There are two general types of projects you could participate in: 1) How is the anatomy of mollusc crushing surfperch specialized for how the pharyngeal jaws are used, and how is this reflected in their feeding ecology? 2) How has the pharyngeal jaw apparatus evolved among surfperches, and how does this related to ecological divergence in the family. I have CT scans from the breadth of surfperch diversity that away your analysis.
Student Qualifications : Sophomores or juniors preferred, but I’m flexible, Completion of BBIO 180 and either ecology or evolution preferred, and 6 hours per week minimum. Interest in marine biology a plus!
Student Outcomes : Depending on the aspect of the project chosen, students will learn a combination of techniques that may include detailed anatomical dissection and analysis, clearing and staining, ecological concepts related to optimal foraging, CT scanning and analysis, and 3D printing. biology.

  • School(s) : STEM
  • Primary PI Name : Jeff Jensen
  • Interested? Contact Faculty Researcher by Email : jsjensen@uw.edu
  • Phone : 425-352-5310
  • Project/Faculty Website : https://jsjensenblog.wordpress.com/
  • Research Location : UW Bothell
  • Project Goals : Evolution and ecological impacts of an evolutionary novelty: Most fishes have a second set of jaws in their pharynx. In some fishes, such as the surf perches that are common along our coast, these pharyngeal jaws are highly specialized and diverse. This allows surfperch to exploit a wide variety of habitats and feed on a diversity of prey. For example, some surf perches feed on hard-shelled invertebrates such as snails. Their pharyngeal jaws allow them to crush snails and give them a food source few other fish can exploit. There are two general types of projects you could participate in: 1) How is the anatomy of mollusc crushing surfperch specialized for how the pharyngeal jaws are used, and how is this reflected in their feeding ecology? 2) How has the pharyngeal jaw apparatus evolved among surfperches, and how does this related to ecological divergence in the family. I have CT scans from the breadth of surfperch diversity that away your analysis.
  • Student Qualifications : Sophomores or juniors preferred, but I’m flexible, Completion of BBIO 180 and either ecology or evolution preferred, and 6 hours per week minimum. Interest in marine biology a plus!
  • Student Outcomes : Depending on the aspect of the project chosen, students will learn a combination of techniques that may include detailed anatomical dissection and analysis, clearing and staining, ecological concepts related to optimal foraging, CT scanning and analysis, and 3D printing.
  • Number of Student Positions Available : 2