September 2013 Plant Profile: Osteospermum ‘Whirligig’

August 30th, 2013 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes

Osteo 4Probably the most asked about plant in our seasonal container plantings, this unique African Daisy is both eye-catching and remarkably easy to grow. ‘Whirligig’ is referred to as a “spoon” type of hybrid where the tips of each petal is scalloped and rounded in shape.

Osteospermum come in various colors and are easy annuals provided that they receive full sun, regular water and fertilizer and in a mild winter, some plants may overwinter and come back the following season.

 

 

 

Common Name: African Daisy
Location: Container at the entrance of Merrill Hall at the Center for Urban Horticulture.
Origin: Garden Origin
Height and Spread: 8-12″ high x 12″ wide
Bloom Time: June-Frost

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Kayak Tours at the Washington Park Arboretum

August 29th, 2013 by Arboretum Education Supervisor, Patrick Mulligan

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Join us for this end of summer tradition at the Washington Park Arboretum as we tour our wetlands by kayaks generously loaned to us by Agua Verde Paddle Club. All proceeds go towards our Saplings Scholarship Fund that enables underprivileged students to take part in our hands-on, science-based school field trip programs.

No experience necessary; kayaks are doubles; max tour size is 12. Spaces are filling fast, so register today!

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Rain Garden Training for Professionals

August 26th, 2013 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Functional and attractive, rain gardens are becoming popular with homeowners and businesses because of the benefits they bring such as reducing water pollution and flooding and increasing property values and appeal (plus government incentives). Learn how to design and install these gardens in our upcoming 2-day workshop for professionals to tap into a new and growing customer base.

Photo Courtesy of 12,000 Rain Gardens

Photo Courtesy of 12,000 Rain Gardens

 

 2-day workshop – October 23-24
8:30a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

University of Washington Botanic Gardens, Center for Urban Horticulture
3501 NE 41st St., Seattle, WA 98105

Cost: $135; Late registration after October 16 is $150.

Draft Agenda for Rain Garden Workshop

Register Online or call 206.685.8033

 

Landscape designers, installers, and maintenance technicians are invited to take advantage of a two-day training.  This professional level training will focus on rain gardens and other low-impact development practices gaining in popularity with savvy homeowners who want to control run-off and beautify their yards.  The class will cover site selection, soils, new regulations, designs, plant selection, and more.

The demand for properly installed rain gardens is growing, creating a new niche and business opportunity for those with adequate training.  State and local programs are, or will soon be, requiring low impact development on new construction and several are offering incentives for retrofit projects.  These regulations are and will increasingly result in the creation of new jobs in the landscape industry.  The workshops will include lunch and refreshments, a copy of the new rain garden handbook, and other take-away materials.

Presented by:

UWBG logo color_small Stewardship Partners Logo WSU Extension

 

 

 

 

Photo Courtesy of 12,000 Rain Gardens

Photo Courtesy of 12,000 Rain Gardens

 

 

 

 

 

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August Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum
(Part II)

August 25th, 2013 by Pat Chinn-Sloan
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Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (August 19 – 25, 2013)

1)    Aralia elata (Japanese Angelica Tree)

  • Natural range: Japan, Korea, Russian Far East
  • Can be a tree more than 30 feet tall. Ours are multiple suckers from a spreading root system.
  • Located north of the Wilcox footbridge (40-3W).

2)   Bupleurum fruticosum

  • A dense, multi-stemmed shrub tolerant of exposure and poor soil.
  • Native to Southern Europe and the Mediterranean.
  • Located in our Rock Rose area west of the Sorbus Collection (21-3E).

3)   Kalopanax septemlobus

  • A member of the Aralia family (Araliaceae), it grows to 100 feet. Its lobed leaves might be mistaken for maple until the umbels of flowers appear in July and August.
  • Native to Japan, Korea, and the Russian Far East.
  • Our best is located west of Azalea Way in 15-1W.

4)   Poliothyrsis sinensis

  • Native to the Chinese province of Hupeh
  • Bears clusters of fragrant white flowers
  • Located south of the Woodland Garden near other so-called primitive trees: Trochodendron, Tetracentron, and Euptelia.

5)   Rosa sp. with Spiny Rose Gall

  • These galls are caused by a tiny wasp, probably Dipolepis bicolor, which lays its eggs in the rose’s leaves. The larvae live in the galls until the following spring.
  • This plant is located in 25-1E at the intersection of the Upper and Lower Trails.
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How would you use an interactive map in the Arboretum?

August 20th, 2013 by Tech Librarian, Tracy Mehlin

QueryScreenshot_source=hinkley

Georeferenced Database Project Update

After a year of surveying Washington Park Arboretum grid points and digitizing paper maps we have made substantial progress on our georeferenced database project. The first few hundred points were relatively easy to survey. Now remain the most difficult points to find or see with a clear line of sight from a control point. Ground nesting bees and wasps also make getting close to a point challenging to say the least.

We need volunteers! Contact Tracy Mehlin.

UW Botanic Gardens Director, Sarah Reichard, talks with UWTV about her vision for an interactive Arboretum map in this video.

How would you use an interactive map in the Arboretum? What do you want to know about the collections? Leave a comment to let us know.

Click to see photo close-ups

Project accomplishments by the numbers

  • Migrated 20,000 records from the Otis Douglas Hyde Herbarium database into the BG-Base database
  • 25% of Herbarium database records post migration validated against physical specimens
  • 85% of grid points surveyed
  • 40% of paper grid maps digitized in ArcMap (geodatabase)
  • 6006 out of 18,094 plant specimens have been entered into the geodatabase

Historic Records to be made accessible

The Arboretum Foundation has agreed to give $15,000 to digitize historic paper records from the Curation office. These historic records provide critical clues about the identification and origin of trees and woody plants in the collection. By digitizing the records staff can access the old handwritten note cards and ledgers from their desk and once integration is complete the records will be accessible to everyone. UW Libraries staff will digitize the records and record basic information about each file.

An accession card from 1948.

An accession card from 1948.

This project is funded by a grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services.

 

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19th Annual Miller Memorial Lecture

August 16th, 2013 by Heidi Unruh, UWBG Communications Volunteer

tony-aventJoin us for the FREE 19th annual Miller Memorial Lecture, featuring Tony Avent, renowned plantsman and horticulturist. Mr. Avent will speak on So Many Plants, So Little Time:  Little Known Perennial Favorites to Delight & Excite!

Tony Avent is the owner of Plant Delights Nursery and the Juniper Level Botanic Garden in Raleigh, North Carolina. Mr. Avent is a well-traveled botanical explorer, author, plant breeder and an exceptional plantsman. His travels have included Mexico, China, Korean, Argentina, Taiwan, and Vietnam to name a few along with extensive exploration of the rich floral communities of the southeastern United States.

 

DETAILS

  • Thursday, September 19, 2013
  • 7:00 pm (d0ors open at 6:15), followed by free reception with refreshments
  • Meany Hall on the UW campus
  • Email:  info@millergarden.org for a free e-ticket!
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Planting a Tree? Consider a Conifer!

August 13th, 2013 by UWBG Arborist, Chris Watson
photo 2 (1)

Black Pine (Pinus nigra)

Washington is known as the “Evergreen State” thanks to our vast conifer forests.  However, large conifers often get overlooked when selecting trees for urban areas.  Conifers such as pine, spruce or fir provide many year round benefits to the urban home or garden. 

The evergreen canopy offers cover for birds and other wildlife.  When planted strategically, conifers can reduce energy costs by shading homes in the summer and blocking wind in the winter.  The expansive root systems of conifers can help to stabilize slopes and reduce erosion.  The canopy of evergreen needles can filter air pollutants and reduce stormwater runoff.  Also, because of their unique form, large conifers will store more carbon and create more oxygen over a smaller area than trees with broad canopies.  Because conifers maximize these benefits all year, these large trees can be an excellent and sustainable choice if  your site has the appropriate space.  In addition to these ecosystem services, conifers often become beloved neighborhood icons as they mature.  

If you have room in your yard for planting a large conifer and live in Seattle, there are free trees available through Seattle reLeaf’s Trees for Neighborhoods Program.  Learn more and apply for your tree here: http://www.seattle.gov/trees/treesforneighborhoods.htm.

photo 1 (1)

Oriental Spruce (Picea orientalis)

 

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August 2013 Plant Profile: Cortaderia richardii

August 6th, 2013 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes

Cort habitIn recognition of the installation of New Zealand’s focal forest at the Pacific Connections Garden, we highlight a stunning ornamental grass that certainly attracts attention at this time of year. The “toe toe” grass is a relative of the more common, but often troublesome Pampas grass (C. selloana).

C. richardii is far more elegant and their plumes arch and sway in a gentle breeze making a dramatic impact in the landscape. It takes full sun and is quite adaptable to poor soils. It is best used as a single specimen or as a grouping of 3-5 clumps so you can admire its form and habit.

Cort 2Like a few Ornamental grasses, it has the potential to re-seed in warmer climates, but it hasn’t been considered invasive here in the Pacific Northwest. Like any plant we’ve accessioned at UWBG, we will closely monitor its habit and take appropriate action should it ever become a problem. For now, we will enjoy it’s striking presence in the New Zealand entry at the Pacific Connections Garden and the South Slope of the Soest Perennial Garden.

Cort 1

Common Name: Toe Toe Grass, Plumed Tussock Grass
Location: Soest Garden – South Slope, WPA Pacific Connections New Zealand
Origin: New Zealand
Height and Spread: 5-7′  high x 5ft. wide
Bloom Time:  July with plume lasting through the winter months.

 

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Announcing the 2nd Annual Kid’s Photography Contest!

August 6th, 2013 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Are you a kid (or know one) between 4 and 16 that has access to a digital camera? Join our Kid’s Digital Photography Contest!

All you have to do is join the UW Botanic Gardens Flickr Group Pool and submit photos in one or more categories.

Link to more information and contest rules.

Last year’s entries!

 

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A glimpse into the past – Mulligan’s historic whitebark pines photo exhibit

August 5th, 2013 by UWBG Communication Staff

By John A. Wott, Director Emeritus

photo

Photo by Brian O. Mulligan circa 1949 of living and dead whitebark pines on pass leading to Ingalls Lake.

This picture is one of 30 mounted black-and-white photographs showing native (NW) coniferous trees (and a few junipers also). Brian O. Mulligan, then Director, Washington Park Arboretum, prepared these as an exhibit for the Royal Horticultural Society’s Conifer Conference, London, England, October 5 – 9, 1970. The photos were taken from 1949-1969 by Brian on his hiking trips, with wife Margaret, to various Western States from California to Wyoming. This specific picture is labeled “Living and dead Whitebark pines on pass leading to Ingalls Lake”.

Brian personally mounted and prepared the photographs and took the display to London. Brian was an active member of the Conifer Societies during his lifetime, and those groups often visited the Arboretum. In 1986, the bulk of the pictures were hung in the Dean’s (Director’s) Conference Room in Anderson Hall where they proudly reside today. They were specifically directed to the attention of Dale W. Cole, associate dean, College of Forest Resources, and the new exhibit was supervised by Steve Archie, College Administrator. Margaret can be seen in many of the photographs.

 

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