Earth Day in the Arboretum with Student Conservation Associaton

April 24th, 2014 by UWBG Horticulturist

SCA_EarthDay2014_ArboretumEarth Day 2014

On Saturday, April 12th, over 220 people joined together at Washington Park Arboretum to celebrate Earth Day with SCA! The day began with Seattle mayor Ed Murray, SCA founder Liz Putnam, current SCA student Diana Furukawa, and others celebrating the day and imploring volunteers to consider the effects of climate change and to take action in their communities. SCA youth lead eight volunteer groups around the park. Together volunteers accomplished the following:

  • 14,044 sq ft invasive plants removed
  • 40 cubic yds mulch spread
  • 205ft trail maintained (graveled)
  • 94 plants potted

Check out amazing photos from the day here!

Check out the project map:

earth_day_SCA_2014

Text and photos contributed by SCA

Share

Washington Park Arboretum tree removal notification

April 24th, 2014 by UWBG Horticulturist

A mature western hemlock, Tsuga heterophylla, is scheduled for removal on Wed, April 30.  It is located in Rhododendron Glen, north of the Glen pond.

  • Fungal conks seen growing on the trunk is an indicator that a rot inducing pathogen is present.
  • Its hazard potential is great due to extensive internal decay.
  • A wild-life snag will be left in place.

Each tree requires evaluation to determine the best course of action for the site.

 

Conks growing on hemlock trunk

Conks growing on hemlock trunk

 

 

 

Share

Trees of Life Art Exhibit and Opening Reception

April 21st, 2014 by Jessica Farmer, Adult Education Supervisor

Trees of Life:  14 artists honor the beauty and mystery of Emerald City’s trees as a Seattle Tree Ambassador graduate hosts local art show reception

Opening reception:

Byori Hwang

Byori Hwang

Friday, April 25
5 – 7 pm
University Friends Meeting Social Hall Art Gallery
4001 9th Ave NE, Seattle
Free; light finger food provided
For more information, contact Clarena at clarena.snyder@gmail.com or 206-632-9839

Exhibit runs through the end of June; hours are Mon – Fri, 9:30 am – 1 pm; Sat and Sun 10 am – 1 pm or by appointment.

This exhibit, curated by a Tree Ambassador, showcases the artwork of trees by Pacific NW artists as a way to inspire and help Seattle’s residents reconnect with nature, specifically the beauty, wisdom, and mystery of trees. The Tree of Life, an ancient and powerful symbol, is deeply embedded in the human psyche. It represents and evokes life, even before science proved its role in providing oxygen and transmuting carbon dioxide.

The 15 Pacific NW artists represent the UW School of Art, the University of Puget Sound School of Art, Sierra Club members, and local community artists from young children to the professional award-winning artist are represented. They have used different media and approaches to expressing the beauty of trees.

Read the full news release and the Trees of Life Curator Statement.

 

Amanda Sweet

Amanda Sweet

 

Molly Hashimoto

Molly Hashimoto

 

Share

April Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum (Part II)

April 20th, 2014 by UWBG Horticulturist
Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (April 15 - 28, 2014)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (April 15 – 28, 2014)

1)   Melicytus angustifolius

  • This southern hemisphere Violaceae relative thrives in rocky places in mountains or on coasts, or in evergreen forests.
  • Is ‘dioecious’ or ‘of two houses’ in Greek translation; male and female flowers are present on separate plants.

2)   Erica arborea var. alpina

  • Found along the southern end of Arboretum Drive, this is one of the older collections in the Washington Park Arboretum, dating back to 1947.
  • This form, var. alpina, is a smaller shrub, very hardy, and with brighter green foliage, making an imposing highlight among smaller heaths and heathers.

3)   Poncirus trifoliata  (syn. Citrus trifoliata)

  • Bitter, non-edible yellow fruits that resemble a small orange
  • Two large specimens in the Arboretum found in grid 8-1W and 12-B, north of the large parking lot off of Lake Washington Bouvelard.

4)   Viburnum carlesii var. bitchiuense

  • This spicy smelling Viburnum is the intoxicating fragrance you’ll be hit with the moment you walk out the front door of the Graham Visitor’s Center.
  • Listed on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants in 1997, our cultivation of this plant helps to preserve a propagation source for future plants.

5)   Phyllocladus alpinus

  • This New Zealand conifer can photosynthesize through highly modified, leaf-like shoots called phylloclades as well as through leaves.
  • The newly-formed seed cones are berry-like, with a fleshy white aril.
  • Male and female flowers are separate, but borne on the same plant.
Share

Another stunning Rhody

April 19th, 2014 by Catherine Nelson, Adult Tours Program Assistant

Rhododendron macabeanum is one of the finest big leaved Rhododendron species and has received the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award Of Garden Merit.  It has larR.mcabeanumge yellow/white flowers often blotched purple inside with an interesting bright pink stigma.  The leaves are a dark glossy green and about 1′ in length with a light colored indumentum on the underside.  It also bears a nice silvery young leaf and bright red bud scales.

Native to India at high elevations, this plant was introduced to the West in 1927.  We have a wonderful specimen in the arboretum.  It is blooming right  now and is located between the SE corner of Loderi Vally and the Magnolia Collection.  Our April Free Weekend Walks on Sundays at 1:00 pm will continue to feature this and other amazing Rhododendrons in the UWBG collection.

Share

Education Team Honored at DSAs

April 8th, 2014 by Arboretum Education Supervisor, Patrick Mulligan
from left to right:  Lisa Sanphillippo, Patrick Mulligan, Wendy Gibble, Sarah Heller, Kit Harrington,  Jessica Farmer, Sasha McGuire

from left: Lisa Sanphillippo, Patrick Mulligan, Wendy Gibble, Sarah Heller, Kit Harrington, Jessica Farmer, Sasha McGuire

Last Thursday, the UW Botanic Gardens’ Education Team was honored at the UW’s annual Distinguished Staff Award Reception held at the HUB Ballroom.  The team, seen posing above at the reception, was 1 of 11 teams nominated to receive this year’s DSA.  Both individual and team winners will be chosen in the coming month and honored at the Annual Awards of Excellence on June 12th in Meany Hall Auditorium.  On behalf of the team, it was a great honor simply to be recognized for the work that we do for the University.  We feel that our work is valuable – it’s why we get out of bed in the morning, but it’s nice to know that our colleagues feel the same way.

During the reception, all nominated individuals and teams were announced and brief descriptions given of their work.  It was remarkable to learn about the great variety of pies the UW has it’s fingers in – everything from streamlining information systems to developing cutting edge treatments for kidney stones.  The UW is a beehive of activity doing great work in all realms of society, and we’re happy to be a part of it.  Wish us luck as final decisions are made regarding this year’s winners.

Share

What does the cone symbolize to you?

April 8th, 2014 by UWBG Communication Staff

The cone represents our collections and the importance of conifers in our landscape. It holds the seeds that embody our commitment to a future where plants and people thrive together.

coneWebFeature_imagine

Much like our varied and extensive collection of woody and herbaceous plants, our organization has evolved and grown over time. Throughout this growth, we have always striven to enrich the lives of students and the public through our education programs, outstanding collections and natural areas. Our two locations, the Center for Urban Horticulture and the Washington Park Arboretum, remain treasured destinations that provide an urban escape, accessible and free, in the heart of Seattle.

With that in mind, we’re very pleased to share with you the latest evolution of our logo. Come grow with us.

uwbgLogo340pxAbout the logo…

THE CONE: Inspired by our native Shore Pine (Pinus contorta), the cone represents our collection and the importance of conifers in our landscape. It holds the seeds that symbolize our commitment to a future where plants & people thrive together.

THE COLORS: Purple & gold to underscore our place within the University of Washington family; we are an integral part of the UW’s School of Environmental & Forest Sciences and serve as a “front porch” where academia mingles with the general public.

THE LOOK: As leaders in the fields of horticulture, environmental restoration and conservation, we are here to share the latest research and expertise with our diverse community of learners. We wanted a look that was professional yet approachable, and recognizable throughout our campus sites and facilities.

Share

April Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

April 6th, 2014 by UWBG Horticulturist
Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (4/1/14-4/14/14)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (4/1/14 – 4/14/14)

1)  Berberis x lologensis

  • A natural hybrid of B. darwinii and B. linearifolia originally found near Lake Lolog, Argentina in 1927
  • If you can get past the thorns, enjoy the rich, spicy fragrance.
  • Located in grid 14-6E near Arboretum Drive.

 

 

2)  Acer tegmentosum  ‘Joe Witt’

  • This striped-bark maple is named for former Arboretum Director Joseph Witt.
  • Located in the Witt Winter Garden and on Arboretum Drive in the Peonies.

3)  Magnolia salicifolia  ‘Else Frye’

  • Selected by Joe Witt for its larger flowers and named for the wife of T.C. Frye.
  • See Arboretum Bulletin Summer 1961, Summer 1962, and Winter 1962 for articles about this tree and the Fryes.
  • The original tree is in the Magnolia Collection, grid 26-2E.

4)  Magnolia x kewensis  ‘Wada’s Memory’

  • Part of a collection of plants purchased from Koichiro Wada in Japan in 1940.
  • Selected by Arboretum Director Brian Mulligan for its unusually large flowers.
  • The original tree is in grid 11-6E in the Hydrangeas.

5)  Quercus suber  (Cork Oak)”

Close-up photo of <em>Quercus suber</em>  (Cork Oak)

Close-up photo of Quercus suber (Cork Oak)

  • Evergreen oak native to southern Europe. A tree of incalculable social value, it produces the cork of
    commerce.
  • Located in the Rock Roses on Arboretum Drive.
  • This cutting includes the distinctive acorns – extremely rare in the Pacific Northwest.
Share

It’s Rhododendron season

April 5th, 2014 by Catherine Nelson, Adult Tours Program Assistant

The Rhododendron occidentale is one of two NW native Rhododendron species (the other being our Washington State Flower, Rhododendron macrophyllum).
Commonly called Western Azalea or Honeysuckle Shrub, it is found along the Pacific Coast from lower Washington to central California. This specrhododendron occidentalisies shrub is tolerant of wet soils and can be found in wetlands and along creeks in its native environment.
These Azaleas can grow to 15 ft. in height and do well in our Seattle climate when provided some shade, though they are not drought tolerant in summers. They are prized for their beautifully colored pink/white/yellow flowers, which are extremely fragrant this time of year.
John Muir encountered the shrub in the Yosemite region & said of it, “It is very showy & fragrant, & everybody must like it not only for itself but for the shady alders & willows, ferny meadows, & living water associated with it.”
Our UW Botanic Gardens’ Free Weekends Walks for the month of April will feature Rhododendron species and cultivars during their their peak bloom time. Please join us any Sunday at 1:00pm at the Graham Visitors Center to learn more.

Share

Get Water Smart with Seattle Tilth and Jessi Bloom

April 4th, 2014 by Jessica Farmer, Adult Education Supervisor

WaterSmartPoster

 

Grow great plants, conserve water, protect our watershed!

Want to learn how to manage stormwater runoff while transforming your yard into a beautiful water smart landscape? Join Seattle Tilth and local landscape designer Jessi Bloom for a free educational workshop, and learn how to plan and construct rain gardens, plant buffers, pervious pavements, green roofs and organic gardens. Plant your rain garden and eat it too!

The University of Washington Botanic Gardens is partnering with Seattle Tilth to kick off the first two workshops in this series. Join us on April 21, 6:30-8:30pm at the Center for Urban Horticulture (Douglas Classroom), or on May 6, 6:30-8:30pm at the Washington Park Arboretum (Graham Visitors Center).

The workshops are free, but pre-registration is requested. Learn more and register.

Questions? Contact Maren Neldam at marenneldam@seattletilth.org or (206) 633-0451 ext. 109.

Share