March Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum (Part II)

March 21st, 2014 by UWBG Horticulturist

“Seeing Red”

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (March 17 - 30, 2014)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (March 17 – 30, 2014)

1)   Acer rubrum      (Red Maple)

  • Specific epithet, rubrum (red), refers to foliage in fall; however, flowers are red too
  • One of the earliest trees to flower, appearing in March, well before the leaves
  • Located at south end of Arboretum Drive East, against the Broadmoor fence
Close-up photo of the Acer rubrum (Red Maple) flowers

Close-up photo of the Acer rubrum (Red Maple) flowers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
2)   Camellia japonica      ‘Jupiter’

  • Carmine-red flowers with prominent yellow stamens on white filaments
  • Located along Ridgetop Trail at head of Rhododendron Glen

3)   Chaenomeles sp.      (Flowering Quince)

  • Old-fashioned, early spring flowering shrub
  • OK, so this specimen is not the reddest available, but the best I could find.
  • Located behind the Stone Cottage along the public path

4)   Grevillea victoriae      (Mountain Grevillea)

  • This proteaceous plant’s foliage was the feature cutting for the first half of March 2014; now it’s the red flowers.
  • Located in the Pacific Connections – Australia Entry Garden

5)   Rhododendron strigillosum

  • Early maroon-red flowering rhododendron
  • Twigs and leaf stalks on young growth covered with long bristles
  • Specimens located in the Witt Winter Garden, Woodland Garden and Sino-Himalayan Hillside
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Harbinger of Spring in Seattle – Flowering cherries on Azalea Way!

March 20th, 2014 by UWBG Horticulturist

Cherry photoMost visitors experiencing the beauty of our historic Azalea Way flowering cherries from now through May probably have no idea of how intensive maintaining their health and prolonging their longevity truly is for the UW Botanic Gardens horticulture staff.   Just ask our Integrated Pest manager, Ryan Garrison. Ryan with staff support spends many a day throughout the year monitoring and controlling the numerous diseases and insect pests our 175 plus cherries are prone to suffer from. Our rainy climate doesn’t help one bit either, especially when dealing with our most notable disease during blossom time;  a fungus known as Cherry Blossom Brown Rot. Yucko!  The good news is any new cherries we plant need to show a reasonable level of resistance. The not so good news is many of our older earlier bloomers, the ones extremely susceptible to the brown rot fungus,  need to be protected with fungicide applications during their bloom period.  As with all of our pest issues, we start with cultural and mechanical control efforts before resorting to chemical controls. The following Integrated Pest management (IPM) program discusses our best management practices for the control of blossom brown rot.  If you are interested in planting cherries for your home garden, I’ve included a list of cherries recommended for our PNW climate.  All have good to excellent resistance to blossom brown rot.

14 new cherries will be planted along Azalea Way, Spring of 2014! Thanks to the UW being awarded funds from the Nationwide Cherry Blossom Tree Planting Initiative grant co-sponsored by the Consulate-General of Japan in Seattle and other supporting local community organizations.

Cherry Blossom Brown Rot - causal fungal agent known as Monolinia fructicola. The fungus overwinters on infected twigs and dried fruit on the tree or ground.  The fungal spores are spread in the spring by wind and rain through the blossoms, causing twig dieback.  As part of the UWBG IPM program, moving toward our goal of eliminating the use of all synthetic pesticides is our ultimate goal.

IPM relies on many strategies to manage plant health care. 

  • Proper ID of the pest and its life cycle
  • Regular monitoring of the plants
  • The use of physical, mechanical, cultural, and biological controls
  • Chemical controls used as a last resort*
  • Least toxic chemicals used

* All spray applications are in compliance with WSDA pesticide regulations.  Sign postings are located at all entrances and Graham Visitor Center. Spray applications are scheduled based on timing and weather. We do our best to apply when public are not present. For more information, pls contact, David Zuckerman at 206-543-8008 or dzman@uw.edu

The cherries are pruned in early fall  to remove infected twigs and improve air circulation.  Tree rings are given a fresh coat of mulch in the fall to bury any infected plant material that may be on the ground.  In our Cherry Replacement program we are only using cultivars that are resistant to Blossom Brown Rot.

Cherries recommended for the PNW:

    • Prunus‘Berry Cascade Snow’
    • Prunus ‘Kwanzan’ syn. ‘Sekiyama’
    • Prunus‘Pink Flair®’
    • Prunus‘Royal Burgundy’
    • Prunus‘Shirofugen’
    • Prunus‘Shirotae’
    • Prunus‘Snow Goose’
    • Prunus subhirtella var. ascendens
    • Prunus x yedoensis ‘Shidare Yoshino’
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Coming Attractions for 2014 in Horticulture and Plant Records

January 21st, 2014 by UWBG Horticulturist

There is much to look forward to in 2014 for the University of Washington Botanic Gardens (UWBG) horticulture and plant records staff. It will be a rare year of “normality” between capital project implementations, the completed 2013 Pacific Connections Gardens (PCG) New Zealand (NZ) forest exhibit and the looming 2015 multi-use trail. Our resources will be focused on smaller scale deferred maintenance projects of several gardens and plant collections, catching up with plant labeling and mapping of our Pacific Connections Gardens and embarking on a few recently awarded grants.

Washington Park Arboretum (WPA)

On the grants front, this spring, Azalea Way and the Japanese Garden will be receiving new cherry trees, along with funding to support future maintenance, thanks to the Japanese Embassy’s Nationwide Cherry Blossom Planting Initiative. Fourteen cherries will be installed of various types, ranging from the tide-and-true classical hybrids to the newer, disease-resistant cultivars. We hope to tap into the services of our volunteer Azalea Way stewards force to help in their planting, establishment and future care.

Club Car vs JD Gator

Club Car vs JD Gator

We just heard that we were awarded $33 thousand from the UW Green Seeds funds, a grants program that engages our UW community in sustainability research that will have a direct affect on reducing UW campus’ carbon footprint. Our 1 year study will allow us to purchase 2  new utility vehicles, 1 electric and 1 bio-diesel, which will be the test subjects of a research project titled:  “Grounds Utility Vehicle Carbon Footprint Comparison Study”. Results and conclusions will be disseminated at the end of the study to UW Grounds Management, Seattle City Parks and Recreation, and other local municipalities and private organizations that employ utility vehicles to perform grounds maintenance tasks.

Our curator, Ray Larson, is busy developing plant lists and procuring new plants for refreshing and embellishing many plant collections displays and exhibits. Our horticulturists will be installing exciting new cultivars and hybrids in the PCG entry gardens of Australia, Cascadia and China.  Also, wild-collected specimens from our container nursery inventory will be planted out in the future China forest portion which was cleared during the NZ forest construction last year. We hope to receive several tree peony cultivars from the Seattle Chinese garden. The  American Peony Arts and Cultural Association is promoting Luoyang peonies. These donations may be planted in the PCG China entry garden, in our original peony display along Arboretum Drive and/or over at the Center for Urban Horticulture.

Overgrown Camellias ready for renovating!

Overgrown Camellias ready for renovating!

Other gardens and collections of 2014 focus for small-scale renovations and/or new plantings include the Winter Garden, Camellias, Hollies, Maples, Pinetum and Viburnums.

On the Plant Records front, catching up with our backlog of labeling and mapping will be a major goal for all UWBG gardens and collections, specifically PCG’s NZ forest and Chilean Gateway. Mapping our collections has moved into the 21st century using sophisticated survey equipment to gather Geo-referenced points that will enable all sorts of modern applications for staff and public alike who want more information on the locations and data of our plant collections.

Center for Urban Horticulture (CUH)

The horticulturists at CUH will certainly not be any less busy or ambitious  in 2014 than those at WPA. The following projects are either underway or in the works:

  •  New plantings for the McVay stairs will include a new bench, bringing back the solar fountain from WPA and, if room allows, also incorporating a container or two.
  • Our “face” along 41st Street is undergoing a much needed “lift.” After the new fence is built, there will be opportunities for new plantings along it. Also, expect to finally see our “Welcome” signs get installed onto the long awaiting stands at both ends of our frontage.
  • Speaking of signs, the tired-looking interpretive signs in the Orin & Althea Soest Herbaceous Display Garden will be replaced shortly. Also, keep your eyes open for changes and new plantings in a few of the Soest display beds.
  • If funding comes through, the Fragrance Garden bed along NHS Hall is on the schedule for renovation this year as well.
  • Goodfellow Grove will continue to be a focus of renovation, with considerable restorative pruning and thinning beds, path and lawn improvements.
  • Later this year, clearing of vegetation around Central pond in the Union Bay Natural Area will take place in hopes of providing more habitat for shore-birds and increasing their diversity.
Solar Fountain to return to CUH

Solar Fountain to return to CUH

As you can see, there’s plenty of work to be done by the UWBG horticulture and plant records staff in 2014. And, yes, a sigh of relief to be able to broaden our horizons beyond all-consuming capital projects for the year to focus on these smaller maintenance improvements of our established gardens, grounds  and collections.  Please stay tuned for further posts and photos on many of these exciting changes to take place in 2014 at our botanic gardens.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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SPRAY NOTIFICATION: Garden Loosestrife, Initial Treatments July 26 through August 9

July 26th, 2013 by UWBG Horticulturist

photo
UW Botanic Gardens has commenced its 5th and final year of the 5yr Dept. of Ecology, Garden Loostrife eradication project.

Our contractor, NW Aquatic Eco-Systems, has scheduled initial  spray applications to commence on July 26 and continue through first week of August.  There will be a final follow-up application in September.

Postings of project and current spray schedules include:

  • Waterfront Activity Center
  • UBNA kiosk
  • Slough bridge sign in E5 parking lot
  • Yesler Swamp Kiosk
  • UBNA loop trail, east-end
  • All Arboretum boat landings
  • Arboretum Waterfront Trail Entrances (Foster Island and old MOHAI )
  • D.O.T. park-n-ride lot off of 520 Lake WA Blvd exit ramp

Lysimachia vulgaris, Garden Loosestrife, a non-native wetland species is invasive in this area. State listed as a class B noxious weed, it requires control by the land manager UW Botanic Gardens as mandated by King County Noxious Weed Control Board.

Treatment includes:

  •  Approximately 5 miles of shoreline property bordering Union Bay including Foster and Marsh Islands in the Washington Park Arboretum
  • An initial and follow up spray application to occur between July 15 and October 1
  •  Both shoreline and land side application of the herbicide Habitat (imazapyr), a selective broadleaf herbicide.
    •  Non toxic to fish and their food web.
    •  No significant risk to birds or mammals

For more information about this project, please call 206-897-1642 or 206-543-8800.

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Trees Cheer for Community Volunteers!

April 30th, 2013 by UWBG Horticulturist

As we bid adieu to relentless April showers, let’s also praise a fond farewell to over 300 relentless April community service volunteers that helped support the stewardship of our beautiful botanic gardens. Because of them, May flowers have never looked and smelled soooo good.

Student Conservation Association 2013 Earth Day at the Washington Park Arboretum. Photo curtesy of SCA.org

Student Conservation Association 2013 Earth Day at the Washington Park Arboretum. Photo curtesy of SCA.org

The 3 Big April events:

    1. April 13, Earth Day in the Arboretum w/ Student Conservation Association – see photos http://www.flickr.com/photos/the-sca/sets/72157633264603184/
    2. April 19, UW Partners w/ Starbucks for Earth Day at CUH and Farm- see video

  1.  April 25, Ivy Out w/ Seattle Prep  - a few photos below
Seattle Prep students removing ivy in the hollies

Seattle Prep students removing ivy in the hollies

Seattle Prep students removing ivy in Pinetum

Seattle Prep students removing ivy in Pinetum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A few of the impressive metrics:

  • Over 22,000 sq feet of invasive plants removed (ivy and blackberry)!
  • Over 60 yrds of mulch spread!
  • Over 1500 native plants planted!
  • Over 20 yrds of ivy hauled!
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Winter Wrap-Up: Certainly NOT Boring…

March 29th, 2013 by UWBG Horticulturist

According to Cliff Mass, UW meteorologist, our past winter of 2012-2013 was the most “boring” on record. There were no major weather events such as wind storms, artic blasts, snowfalls in the lowlands or major flooding. This was indeed good news for the UWBG horticulture staff. Instead of spending the winter cleaning up after storms and worrying about how many plants would be affected from cold hardiness issues, we were able to focus on scheduled and planned work projects for a seasonal change of pace.  Here’s a rundown of several of these projects we were able to accomplish during this most boring winter.

Reclaimed View of Azalea Way from Lookout

Reclaimed View of Azalea Way from Lookout

An adjunct to the current Pacific Connections Garden – New Zealand construction work was taking on the long overdue renovation of the Lookout rockery and reclaiming the lost vistas from the Lookout viewpoints. Arguably the most interesting rock work in the arboretum, the rockery was essentially lost under overgrown plant collections. The crew certainly wasn’t bored with the thought of what new and exciting discoveries lay under the next pruning cut. When the Lookout gazebo reopens to the public, visitors will be able to see the pond and Azalea Way from inside the newly restored structure and experience the original 1941 design intent. In other words, the Lookout is once again a lookout. Also, check out the new  Rhododendron species planted along the Lookout trail in honor of Ben and Margaret Hall’s 80th birthdays. They are major supporters and donors of UW Botanic Gardens.

Raoulia australis close-up

Raoulia australis close-up

McVay Courtyard  Raoulia australis grndcvr

McVay Courtyard
Raoulia australis grndcvr

The McVay Courtyard renovation is mostly completed now thanks to Riz and Annie and contains many new additions. The original designer, Iain Robertson,  specified renewing the 3 distinct plant groups: Bulbs, Groundcovers and Shrubs. The existing grove of Acer palmatum ‘Aconitifolium’ which were carefully worked around and a few Osmanthus are all that remain of the original tree and shrub palette  Iain’s new design incorporates elements of interesting plant architecture, habits and striking bark. Hence his use of several types of Arctostaphylus, the unusual divaricating shrub, Corokia, Rhododendron moupinense, Rh schlippenbachii, and several tidy groundcovers that mimic inanimate forms, such as Raoulia and  Bolax. For the bulk of color, Iain chose a wide-range of spring and summer flowering bulbs.  Though the garden looks a bit austere at the moment, as any newly planted landscape does, we’re looking forward to a quick and healthy establishment and growth period this spring and summer. For those that miss the striking habit of the Nolinia, no need to panic, they were successfully transplanted  to the adjacent cistern slope and new stairs  to the south.
Washington Park Arboretum is once again a UW-Restoration Ecology Network capstone site. The student group known as the “A-Team” has designed a weir system in the north “wet” zone of the holly collection. They will be continuing construction and planting this spring. Ryan and company decided it’s better to flow with nature rather than fight it. This new feature will, over time, become a healthy wetland area and will immediately reduce both UWBG and City Parks maintenance input, i.e., mowing and weed control.

"A-Team" installing weirs

“A-Team” installing weirs

The Winter Garden was in showcase form as it should be during the winter. Roy has been busy procuring new plants primarily for the new drainage area in the SE quadrant of the garden. We’re looking forward to having an updated brochure and map next winter. There’s still time to catch some of the late winter, early spring flowering plants such as Corylopsis and Magnolia.
Gardeners, Rhett and Preston, took on the tatty northeastern most corner of Rhododendron Glen. Pruning out several years worth of Rhododendron rootstock growth and removing deadwood in the grove, removal of several poor or dead specimens, and lots of sheet mulching! Wow, I’ve never seen it so good and I’ve been around these parts a long time.

Chris and Darrin spent several days up at the double parking lot along the Broadmoor fence tackling deferred storm damage cleanup and improving view corridors. I would expect ne’erdowells will think twice about using this area for their dirty deeds for quite some time.

Adding soil to Chilean Gateway via conveyor belt system along LWBlvd


Adding soil to Chilean Gateway via conveyor belt system along LWBlvd

The Lake Washington Blvd curbside area along the Chilean Gateway is vastly improved as a result of over 120 yards of new soil  brought in to create “fingers” at the toe of the slope. This new design will hopefully deter pedestrians from walking through the Gateway and stepping on our plants. Also, with improved drainage, we now can grow Elymus magellanicus without drowning its roots. There are also several new Chilean taxa planted throughout the Gateway that over time as they get bigger will create that Wow! sensation, either up close or from a distance. They include: Gunnera magellanica, Ourisia coccinea, Mitraria coccinea to name a few.

Will spring be as boring too? The UWBG horticulture staff certainly hopes so.

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Harbinger of Spring in Seattle – Early flowering cherries on Azalea Way!

March 25th, 2013 by UWBG Horticulturist

bird enjoying cherry flowersMost visitors experiencing the beauty of our historic Azalea Way flowering cherries from now through May probably have no idea of how intensive maintaining their health and prolonging their longevity truly is for the UW Botanic Gardens horticulture staff.   Just ask our Integrated Pest manager, Ryan Garrison. Ryan with staff support spends many a day throughout the year monitoring and controlling the numerous diseases and insect pests our 175 plus cherries are prone to suffer from. Our rainy climate doesn’t help one bit either, especially when dealing with our most notable disease during blossom time;  a fungus known as Cherry Blossom Brown Rot. Yucko!  The good news is any new cherries we plant need to show a reasonable level of resistance. The not so good news is many of our older earlier bloomers, the ones extremely susceptible to the brown rot fungus,  need to be protected with fungicide applications during their bloom period.  As with all of our pest issues, we start with cultural and mechanical control efforts before resorting to chemical controls. The following Integrated Pest management (IPM) program discusses our best management practices for the control of blossom brown rot.  If you are interested in planting cherries for your home garden, I’ve included a list of cherries recommended for our PNW climate, all have good to excellent resistance to blossom brown rot.

Cherry Blossom Brown Rot - causal fungal agent known as Monolinia fructicola. The fungus overwinters on infected twigs and dried fruit on the tree or ground.  The fungal spores are spread in the spring by wind and rain through the blossoms, causing twig dieback.  As part of the UWBG IPM program, moving toward our goal of eliminating the use of all synthetic pesticides is our ultimate goal.

IPM relies on many strategies to manage plant health care. 

  • Proper ID of the pest and its life cycle
  • Regular monitoring of the plants
  • The use of physical, mechanical, cultural, and biological controls
  • Chemical controls used as a last resort*
  • Least toxic chemicals used

* All spray applications are in compliance with WSDA pesticide regulations.  Sign postings are located at all entrances and Graham Visitor Center. Spray applications are scheduled based on timing and weather. We do our best to apply when public are not present. For more information, please contact, David Zuckerman at 206-543-8008 or dzman@uw.edu

The cherries are pruned in early fall  to remove infected twigs and improve air circulation.  Tree rings are given a fresh coat of mulch in the fall to bury any infected plant material that may be on the ground.  In our Cherry Replacement program we are only using cultivars that are resistant to Blossom Brown Rot.

Cherries recommended for the PNW:

    • Prunus ‘Berry Cascade Snow’
    • Prunus ‘Kwanzan’ syn. ‘Sekiyama’
    • Prunus ‘Pink Flair®’
    • Prunus ‘Royal Burgundy’
    • Prunus ‘Shirofugen’
    • Prunus ‘Shirotae’
    • Prunus ‘Snow Goose’
    • Prunus subhirtella var. ascendens
    • Prunus x yedoensis ‘Shidare Yoshino’
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Building the New Zealand Forest, Pacific Connections Update

March 11th, 2013 by UWBG Horticulturist

The 2.5 acre New Zealand  forest construction project is scheduled to be completed by the end of June.  W.S. Contractors LLC  is currently finishing up infrastructure details, including the future bus turnaround and toilet area located across Arboretum Drive from the NZ  forest in the future Australia exhibit. Irrigation system installation will begin later this month through May. Planting will begin in June. There will be approximately 10,000 total plants representing over 90 taxa for the 9 plant communities that will be represented.  Garden dedications have been tentatively set for September 13 and 14.

In tandem with the 2.5 acre NZ focal forest project, the Lake Washington Blvd street lighting upgrade through WPA is completed. The Olmsted inspired lamps installed with modern LED bulbs is a huge aesthetic and vehicular safety improvement.   Also, the lower section of the Chilean Gateway re-do will be wrapping up with new plantings in the coming weeks. Our goal for the lower Chilean Gateway is to make it uninviting for pedestrians to walk curbside and trample our plants. We accomplished this by creating raised “fingers” and small berms close to the curb by adding over 120 yards of soil amendment. The well-draining soil-mix will also provide much better growing conditions for the Chilean blue wheatgrass, Elymus megellanicus, than before.

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WPA Historic Event: Tree Transplants for the Ages

November 11th, 2012 by UWBG Horticulturist

90″ root balls ready to go.

I think it’s safe to say that history was made last Tuesday, Nov. 6, and it had nothing to do with election day. It was the day the largest trees ever, 3 “Southern Beeches”, were transplanted in the arboretum to their new homes in the construction of the New Zealand focal forest of Pacific Connections Garden.

Here are the “WOW!” factoids:

  • Big Trees of Snohomish and Magnum Crane from Kent, accomplished the amazing feat.
  • It took a 175 Ton crane to do the job!
  • Their rootballs each weighed between 12,000 and 20,000 lbs!
  • The trees were between 30′- 40′ tall with up to 20′ canopy spreads!
  • Their trunks were between 8″-10″ calipers!

Utube video provided by AF staff, Rhonda Bush

Let’s wish these trees luck in adapting and establishing into their new home.

Hoisting up via crane

Photos taken by Todd Holms of Big Trees this one showing one of these Goliath trees suspended by crane over its new home.


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WPA Goes Hollywood: Release of film “The Details”

November 11th, 2012 by UWBG Horticulturist

It’s been a few years since many of our staff witnessed a film shoot in the arboretum featuring Spiderman star, Tobey Maguire. Now, the big payoff, “The Details” has hit the big screen. It garnered a 3-star review in Friday’s Times “Weekend Plus” by John Hartl.

http://seattletimes.com/html/movies/2019636923_mr09details.html

What are you waiting for! Go check it out and keep your eyes open for arboretum landmarks.

 

 

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