WPA Tree Removal Notice

June 26th, 2012 by UWBG Horticulturist

Several standing dead UWBG tree collections are scheduled for removal beginning this week. Removals, public safety and postings, all handled via UWBG tree crew.

The list includes:

  • 225-89-B Cupressus guadalupensis – Pinetum 34-4W
  • 1550-45  Oxydendrum arborea – Rh. Glen 12-7E
  • 52-10  Araucaria araucana – PC Ch. Gateway 1S-4E
  • 164-49-A Acer tegmentosum – Asiatic Maples 27-B
  • 37-02-A Clerodendrum trichotomum – GVC 42-4E
  • 418-55-A Sorbus japonica – Sorbus 20-4E

Thank you,

David Zuckerman

Manager of Horticulture and Plant Records

UW Botanic Gardens

VM 206.543.8008

FX   206.616.2971

dzman@uw.edu

 

 

 

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Horticulture Vignettes from a Busy Spring in the Gardens

June 25th, 2012 by UWBG Horticulturist

“Something old…”

OK, so there’s the “old”, as in “enough already”, cold wet spring weather that seems to be continuing into summer and creating a monster weed season for us. And, there’s the “old” as in a staff milestone reached in age by none other than Riz Reyes, Soest Gardener.  Sure, compared to most of our seasoned horticulture staff, he’s still just a sapling in the woods at 30, but ever so slowly, he’s beginning to put down roots and develop heartwood, true elements of perennial long-life. Happy BD Riz! It’s about time….

In our special gardens: “Old” as in “they only flower once, set seed and then die”, a condition known as monocarpism. We are fortunate to have 7 giant flowering stalks, of our Cardiocrinum giganteum, Giant Himalayan lilies, ready to open. This is a “do not miss opportunity” found in the China entry garden of Pacific Connections! Don’t delay, check ‘em out today…

Giant Himalayan Lilies ready to flower

 

“Something new…”

We just completed what I consider to be an unprecedented year of planting in the Botanic Gardens. A total of 375 plants, includes transplants, representing 157 taxa (different kinds) have been planted out for the 2011/2012 planting season. Highlights include significant additions to our core collections: maples, hollies, oaks and conifers; as well as, our special gardens, Cascadia focal forest, Woodland and Winter Garden. Of note, there were 21 large, mature specimens, mostly witch-hazel family members, transplanted by Big Trees Inc of Snohomish, from our current Pacific Connections construction project footprint to various other gardens throughout arboretum grounds. If interested in viewing our 2011/2012 planting roster, please contact dzman@uw.edu

Also, exciting new interpretive signage has been installed in our Winter Garden and Holly collections. Winter Garden signage was funded by Lake Washington Garden Club, Unit III and includes 4 interpretive signs and 1 place ID sign. The holly signage was funded by our partner Century Link Pioneers for their centennial project of 2011 and includes 5 interpretive signs and 1 place ID sign.  These new signs follow our 2004 Interpretive and Wayfinding Plan that can be viewed on-line at: http://depts.washington.edu/uwbg/docs/finaliwplan.pdf

New Interpretive Sign in Hollies

“Something borrowed…”

Thanks to being able to borrow Iain Robertson’s precious time, we now have a renewal plan for the McVay courtyard. This spring, CUH horticulture staff and volunteers, re-graded and replanted the westernmost bed, closest to the Commons. We hope to be able to implement the rest of the plan in September when the NAIOP group comes in to give CUH a new facelift! We’ll keep our fingers crossed…

Perhaps a stretch here, but certainly an important arboretum story, is the latest on the fate of the original ‘Joe Witt’ maple located along Arboretum Dr E in the Peony section. We fear it is not long for this world suffering from a malady of trunk cankers and stem girdling roots.  To make matters worse, we have lost 2 of 3, with the 3rd one barely hanging-on, of the newly planted ‘Joe Witt’ cuttings in the renovated Winter Garden bed. We have asked the Arboretum Foundation’s Pat Calvert propagation group to come to the rescue and establish new cuttings from the original tree this summer. In the meantime, Roy Farrow, just planted a large ‘Joe Witt’ specimen we procured from Molbak’s nursery last week. We’ll keep our fingers crossed that this story has a happy ending.

“Something blue…”

“Blue”  NOT as in the blue trees in Westlake Park downtown or along the Burke Gilman trail or the Blue poppies at Rhododendron Species Botanical Garden, but “Blue” as in “I gots da blues…” This column would not be complete without a bit of sad news.

We had to remove one of the City’s largest Henry Lauder’s Walking Stick or contorted hazel-nut specimen located in our Winter Garden last week due to the pervasive Eastern hazelnut blight disease. This specimen was particularly dear to my heart since I was in on the original procurement and planting back in 1993. Alas, it is no longer w/ us, but fond memories will live on in my heart forever. If you want to hear its amazing story, it’ll have to be over a Guinness at my favorite pub…

And, now on to a productive summer of new plant care in the Botanic Gardens…

 

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Get Your Hands Dirty this Earth Day

April 7th, 2012 by UWBG Horticulturist

Join the Student Conservation Association (SCA), the University of Washington Botanic Gardens (UWBG), and Seattle Parks and Recreation for a day of fun service projects at the Washington Park Arboretum.

When: Saturday, April 14, 2012. 9:00am – 2:00pm

Where: Washington Park Arboretum, 2300 Arboretum Drive E, Seattle 98112. (Meet in the Meadow—a 5 minute walk south of the Graham Visitors Center.)

What to bring: water bottle, sack lunch, travel mug for a hot drink, sunscreen, rain gear, long pants, layers of clothing, and boots. Some snacks & drinks will be provided. Tools, gloves, snacks, environmental education, and project materials will be provided.

photo
Student volunteers having fun spreading mulch at the Arboretum at a previous Earth Day event.

PLEASE RSVP to the SCA

For more information and to register, visit thesca.org/seattle, email wanw@thesca.org or call 206.324.4649

Printable Flyer 

Map of project locations at Washington Park Arboretum

In partnership with the Seattle Parks and Recreation, UW Botanic Gardens and Woodland Park Zoo.

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Early Rhododendrons Blooming at the Washington Park Arboretum

February 28th, 2012 by UWBG Horticulturist

cuttings photo
1)  Rhododendron arboreum hybrid

  • The earliest, longest blooming rhododendron in the Arboretum (November-March!)
  • Due to its floriferous nature, even in the coldest winters when it sustains bud blast from a deep freeze, it usually never fails to flower afterwards.
  • Located in Witt Winter Garden, this rhododendron is worthy of naming and becoming a WPA plant selection.

2) Rhododendron ‘Cilpinense’

  • Hybrid between parents of two Chinese spp., Rh. ciliatum and Rh. moupinense
  • Compact, low-growing rhododendron that blooms in late February into March
  • Nice grouping located in Winter Garden, bed F

3) Rhododendron mucronulatum ‘Cornell Pink’

  • My personal favorite harbinger of spring rhododendron
  • Species is native to Korea, a.k.a. Korean rhododendron
  • Can’t miss ‘em beginning to flower at north end of Azalea Way, x from GVC

4)  Rhododendron ririei

  • Large rhododendron, best in partial-shade for vivid magenta-purple color to show
  • Native to Mt. Omei, W. Szechwan and flowers late February – early March.
  • This specimen is located in Loderi Valley, southwest bed with hemlock cvs

 5)  Rhododendron strigillosum

  • Rare, rich red flowering rhododendron in late February – early March
  • Stiff, bristly leaf-stalks and narrowly-oblong leaves provide added texture and show

Several new specimens located in Witt Winter Garden.

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Phytophthora Resistant Port Orford Trials Underway in Washington Park Arboretum

February 7th, 2012 by UWBG Horticulturist

The future health outlook bodes well for what many consider to be our finest native conifer in the PNW, Chamaecyparis lawsoniana, Port Orford cedar and its many cultivars.   Port Orford cedars have been under seige for many years from its worst enemy Phytophtora lateralis, a soil-borne pathogen that is especially virulent in wet soils, and essentially spells a death-sentence to this majestic tree once its roots are infected. There is no cure, but there is a preventative practice known as plant resistance. Dr. Everett Hansen at Oregon State University has developed a Phytophthora lateralis resistant root stock. And now, thanks to the development and research labs of Monrovia, they have introduced into the trade numerous Port Orford cultivars grafted with the phytophthora resistant root stock. These grafted Port Orfords are known as The GUARDIAN Series .

Through a generous donation from Monrovia, the Washington Park Arboretum will be trialing 6 GUARDIAN Series Port Orford cultivars, as well as, the type species grown on its own root. We have chosen 5 known “hot-spots” (either cultured or symptomatic of phytophthora infested soils) throughout the arboretum. There are 2 specimens each of the cultivars and the type. We’ll be monitoring and reporting on their growth and health for a period of 5 years. Knowing the extensive research and development that has gone into The GUARDIAN Series Port Orfords, after the 5-year trial, I expect a 100% survival-rate. Stay tuned for periodic updates on this exciting plant trial study.

 

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“Day of Caring” in the Arboretum, September 16, 2011

September 23rd, 2011 by UWBG Horticulturist
And the astonishing United Way “Day of Caring”  numbers are in!
  • 103 total volunteers working 417 hours!
  • Representing 4 companies/corporations: AT&T, Japan Business Association, Microsoft, Nordstrom
  • Completing 5 projects:
    • AT&T – Holly Collection
      • 3 truckloads of blackberry and weeds hauled out, roots and all!
      • Native plant bed and holly berm weeded and mulched!
    • Japan Business Association-Pacific Connections Garden, Siskiyou Slope
      • Weeded over 1,100 linear feet of 8’wide pathways and hauled out 3 truckloads of weeds!
    •  Microsoft – Pinetum
      • Wheelbarrowed and spread over 36 yards of mulch covering over 30 tree rings and beds!
    • Microsoft – Rhododendron Glen
      • 7 truckloads of blackberry hauled out, roots and all!
    • Nordstrom – Azalea Way
      • Wheelbarrowed and spread over 5000 sq’ of mulch covering several north-end Azalea beds!
  • NOTE: 1 truckload is apporximately 3 yards.
  • Special thanks to our sponsoring partner,  The Arboretum Foundation – especially Cynthia Welte and Rhonda Bush and of course our other managing partner, Seattle Parks and Rec. Without you guys, Day of Caring wouldn’t be possible.

    Blackberry Galore in Rhododendron Glen

Microsoft staff laboring in the Pinetum


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Maintenance Improvement: Azalea Way Gravel Path

August 22nd, 2011 by UWBG Horticulturist
Azalea Way photo

An expansion of the Azalea Way lawn path is proposed.

Historically the Azalea Way lawn path experiences 8-9 months a year that are very wet making access difficult. In 2009 a crushed rock path was added to the middle of Azalea Way from Boyer Parking lot to the Woodland Garden. The proposed improvement will add 700 feet of 6 foot wide crushed rock path from the Woodland Garden to the Lynn Street Bridge Trail.

Parks anticipates the construction of the path will take place over the first two weeks in September 2011. We will work in sections to minimize the impact on users.

The project is funded by generous donation from the Arboretum Foundation.

Thank you for your support and patience during this project. 

For more project information please contact:

Lisa Chen, Park Horticulturalist Seattle Parks and Recreation 206-233-3777 or lisa.chen@seattle.gov

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SPRAY NOTIFICATION: Garden Loosestrife, Initial Applications July 26 through August 9

August 4th, 2011 by UWBG Horticulturist

UW Botanic Gardens has begun its 5th and final year of the 5yr Dept. of Ecology, Garden Loostrife eradication project.

 Our contractor, NW Aquatic Eco-Systems, has scheduled initial  spray applications to commence on July 26 and continue through first week of August.  Postings of project and current spray dates are located at all public accessible waterfront locations.  There will be a final follow-up application in September.

Lysimachia vulgaris, Garden Loosestrife, a non-native wetland species is invasive in this area. State listed as a class B noxious weed, it requires control by the land manager UW Botanic Gardens as mandated by King County Noxious Weed Control Board.

 

 

Treatment includes: 

  •  Approximately 5 miles of shoreline property bordering Union Bay including Foster and Marsh Islands in the Washington Park Arboretum
  • An initial and follow up spray application to occur between July 15 and October 1
  •  Both shoreline and land side application of the herbicide Habitat (imazapyr), a selective broadleaf herbicide. 
    •  Non toxic to fish and their food web.
    •  No significant risk to birds or mammals

                                  

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WPA Tree Removal Notification

June 28th, 2011 by UWBG Horticulturist

WPA tree removal scheduled for Thursday (6/30):

Tsuga heterophylla (Western Hemlock)

WPA Native Matrix

Location: Along Arboretum Dr. E., field nursery fence row. Grid 28-4E

Status: Standing dead, in decline for several years prior

Targets: Pedestrians, vehicular traffic along Arboretum Dr and other UWBG plant collections

Cause: Cumulative root impacts from road and infrastructure maintenance and develpment.

UWBG tree crew will perform removal and responsible for all public safety precautions. Drive will be kept open, traffic will be detoured around work zone.

Postings on-site, Graham Visitor center and on UWBG website.

Questions?

206-543-8008

David Zuckerman

Horticulture Supervisor

UW Botanic Gardens

VM 206.543.8008

FX   206.616.2971

dzman@uw.edu

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WPA Tree Removal Notification

June 21st, 2011 by UWBG Horticulturist

WPA tree removal scheduled this week: 6/22-24

UWBG plant collection accession #:  88-62-A

Acer rubrum var trilobum (Carolina Red Maple)

Location: North Pinetum, aka Conifer Meadows, Grid 42-4W

Status: Standing Dead

Cause: Unknown, however suspect of phytophthera and abiotic stress during 2007 irrigation mainline installation. Evidence of fungal disease under bark.

UWBG tree crew will perform removal and is responsible for all public safety precautions and possible trail closures.

Postings also on-site and at Graham Visitors Center

Questions?

206-543-8008

David Zuckerman

Horticulture Supervisor

UW Botanic Gardens

VM 206.543.8008

FX   206.616.2971

dzman@uw.edu

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