Plant a Neighborhood Landmark—Apply for a Street Tree!

August 22nd, 2014 by Jessica Farmer, Adult Education Supervisor

From our friends at Seattle reLeaf:

Does this hot, sunny weather have you wishing your street had more tree canopy? The City of Seattle’s Trees for Neighborhoods program helps Seattle residents plant trees around their homes. Since 2009, residents have planted over 4,000 trees in yards and along streets through the program. Through Trees for Neighborhoods, participants receive up to four free trees, assistance applying for street tree planting permits, and training on tree planting and care.

 

Plant a future neighborhood landmark—apply for a white oak, silver linden, tulip tree, or black tupelo for your planting strip! Imagine the awe-inspiring beauty a street tree could someday provide your neighborhood. All of these trees require at least a 7 or 8 foot planting strip with no overhead power lines. Ready for a tree? Don’t delay—the application for street trees closes Wednesday, August 27th! Yard tree applications will be accepted until October.

 

To apply for a street tree visit www.seattle.gov/trees. If you have questions, email TreesforNeighborhoods@seattle.gov or call (206) 684-3979.

Tulip Tree Flower

Tulip Tree Flower

Black Tupelo Leaf

Black Tupelo Leaf

White Oak

White Oak

Linden Flowers

Linden Flowers

Share

A Day in the Life

August 20th, 2014 by Lisa Sanphillippo

imagine
you are outside. The sun is shining, illuminating the new growth on the western red cedars. It’s been a great growing season and the plants at Washington Park Arboretum are thriving. The backdrop of evergreen trees is a lovely frame to all of the native and non-native plants in the collection. Now, if they would just get here!

Akoloutheo 4-18-14 36

Photo by Lisa Sanphillippo

Just when you thought you couldn’t wait any longer, here comes the bus holding 60 scheduled school-aged children just bursting with energy and excitement to be out of school and outside on such a fine day as this. Today, you will be teaching 15 of them the Native Plants and Native People program. What is native? What is invasive? Who was born in this state? Who are the Puget Sound Salish People? The kids get engaged by the questions you ask. You are showing them their participation and input is valuable.

You will focus some of their amazing energy into a running game about what it is people need to survive. After they have run out some of their shenanigans, you might point out that most everything folks need to survive comes from plants. And with the Puget Sound Salish People, they didn’t just use any old plants; they used plants that are native – original to this place.

Photo by Jacob Smithers

It will surprise you how many of them know what a western red cedar looks like. The J-shaped branches and the flat leaves are very familiar to most of them. But, you can still teach them about western hemlock and its different length needles and puzzle-piece bark. Douglas fir might be new to them, too. Though, once the children see the deep and creviced bark and the way-up high branches, it will be hard for them to forget. Maybe you will tell them the story of the mouse looking for a safe home during a forest fire using the cones of each to differentiate and describe the three trees. You know that story will create a great memory for them about how to identify all three trees.

You will show them artifacts made by local Ethnobotanist, Heidi Bohan. They will get a chance to touch and hold a model of a cedar weaving, fishing spear or canoe bailer. Each made to demonstrate how plants can be used to create a beautiful and useful object that could help a person survive and thrive. When you ask the kids what they use in their everyday lives that is made from plants, you are impressed that the list they give you is so long.

Photo by Jacob Smithers

When you show them to salal and Oregon grape plants and tell them about how berries from each were mixed together along with huckleberry to make a delicious berry cake sort of like a fruit roll up, you can see that they are almost ready for lunch! To distract them, you get them going on the hands-on activities.

This is your favorite part, because they have to work together as a team – just as Puget Sound Salish people of the past and present – to understand how to use a fire bow and drill or to build a single wall of a plank house or to learn how to cook food below the ground. It’s a great distraction because they’ve forgotten about their hunger for a moment as they dig in to the task at hand.

Jacob Smithers

It’s nearly the end of the program, now. You gather them together and ask each person to tell you something they learned or liked from the field trip. It is thrilling how many of them remember that the western hemlock makes sunscreen, how Douglas fir has mouse butts in the cones or that homes can be made without nails.

You thank them and walk them back to the start where their bus will come for them and take them back to school. You hope they will remember today as a positive and fun day. You hope the time here will aid them in their classroom work. Most of all, you hope they will continue to love and learn about plants and one day be a person who advocates for and serves the environment.

You head back to the work room to talk with your fellow guides about the kids and their chaperones and to put away the activities and props from the program. You are tired – sheesh, kids take it out of you – but you are proud to be a part of something important and worthy.

This is the kind of day we get to have at University of Washington Botanic Gardens Washington Park Arboretum. Is it the kind of day you might like?

Our Volunteer Garden Guides bring their knowledge and skills to teach about native plants, forests, pollination, photosynthesis, wetland plants and animals, ecosystems and habitat. We provide training, curricula and enrichments so each person is confident and comfortable teaching.

Consider donating your valuable time and expertise to connecting kids to nature through field trips. We welcome you to be a part of our incredible team of staff and volunteers. We can tell you will fit right in.

  • UW Botanic Gardens Volunteer Garden Guide Training begins September 5th with a kayak tour of the Washington Park Arboretum and continues the following week.
  • For more information about becoming a volunteer and training, please contact Lisa Sanphillippo, School Programs Coordinator, at 206-543-8801 or lsanphil@uw.edu.
Share

Winter Garden Project: Remodeling the “Living Walls”

August 20th, 2014 by UWBG Horticulturist

Arboretum Tree Removal Notification:

 

The week of 8/25/14, UWBG tree crew will embark on a project located in the Winter Garden (read about project below). 

4 western red cedars will be removed due to negative impact to plant collections and garden encroachment. 

All pedestrian path detours and other safety considerations will be handled by tree crew. 

If possible, cedar logs will be salvaged for future park uses.  

UW professor of landscape architecture and designer of our Winter Garden (1987), Iain Robertson, states it’s time to open up the “room” that has been closing in on the Winter Garden for over 25 years. Continuous growth of the “living walls”, predominantly western red cedars, is now negatively impacting many of the garden’s choice plant collections. Due to this encroachment, the garden “room” is feeling confining. Judicious consideration and deliberation has led to the following curation and horticultural decisions.

Project Scope:

  • Removal of 4 western red cedars to provide needed light and future growing space for plant collections. In all cases, the “room’s walls” will expand, yet filled in by existing trees in the background to continue to provide the experience of being in an enclosed space.Pruning of several other cedars to provide light and future growing space for plant collections.
    • 2 on the west side in the “twig bed”
    • 1 on the south side next to the Chinese red birch grove
    • 1 on the east side growing over several camellias and other collections
Share

August Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

August 17th, 2014 by Kathleen DeMaria, Arboretum Gardener
Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (August 11 - 24, 2014)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (August 11 – 24, 2014)

1)   Poliothyrsis sinensis

  • A rare and very attractive small flowering tree of upright, open habit.
  • Originally brought from China to the Arnold Arboretum by E.H. Wilson.
  • Big 6-8” mildly fragrant, creamy flower clusters (corymbose panicles) make a significant contribution to the August-September garden.
  • Located in grid 30-3E, near the south entrance to the Woodland Garden along Arboretum Drive.

2)   Daphniphyllum macropodum

  • This dioecious plant (translation = “of two houses”) needs plants of both sexes to seed.
  • Our largest grouping sits in grid 7-2E.  This area was recently renovated for the New Zealand Garden construction, allowing more light and air to these plants.
  • Purplish-red petioles, copious berries and leaves arranged in tight spirals make this one of the most asked-about plants in the Washington Park Arboretum.

3)   Veronica salicifolia   (Hebe salicifolia)

  • Is it a Hebe? Is it a Veronica?  Just wait and it might change again!
  • Large, spear-shaped, white flowers populate this New Zealand native in late summer.
  • Salicifolia = “leaf like a Salix (willow)”, hence the common name willow-leaved hebe.

4)   Buplerum fruitcosum

  • This evergreen shrub in the carrot family has striking leathery blue-green foliage.
  • Long-lasting, umbels of greenish-yellow flowers bloom in late spring/early summer.
  • Flowers are highly attractive to a number of predatory insects that feed on aphids and other garden pests.

5)   Argyrocytisus battandieri

  • Commonly called Pineapple Broom, this pea-family plant produces yellow flowers atop blue-gray foliage.
  • Native to Morocco, this plant grows best in full sun and well-drained soil.
  • Located along the west side of Arboretum Drive in grid 16-5E.
Share

The “Lost” Enkianthus Grove in Washington Park Arboretum

August 8th, 2014 by UWBG Horticulturist

Does anyone reading this know where our arboretum’s “lost” Enkianthus grove is located? By “lost”, I mean extremely well-hidden under a dense canopy of western red cedars and other trees.

photo

Enkianthus specimens previously “lost” in the overgrowth.

Enkianthus are shade-tolerant shrubs, but NOT “black-hole” shade tolerant. Like most living plants, they do need light to grow and thrive.  It’s a bit embarrassing, but I can honestly say, during my 30 plus year tenure on the UWBG horticulture staff, I don’t recall ever working in the area for longer than maybe a day cleaning up after a storm or pruning a few of the bigger trees. And, we definitely did not pay any attention to the main attraction – a grove of over 50 Enkianthus specimens, mostly all E. campanulatus (red-vein enkianthus) and over 70 years old! Well, the answer to the question above is Rhododendron Glen, encompassing several grid maps (14-2E, 14-3E and 15-3E).

photo

Accession number 2352-37, this Enkianthus campanulatus was planted in 1937.

Now for the good news. Thanks to funding designated for Rhododendron Glen, our horticulture staff has taken on the project to restore the grove for all to be able to once again, after a very long hiatus, enjoy its natural beauty and splendor throughout the year.

The project scope includes the following to improve the health and display of the Enkianthus grove:

  • Increase light conditions through selective understory brush clearing, tree removals and pruning
  • Open view corridors and a cleared natural pathway for visitors to walk from the upper Rhododendron Glen pond area down to the lower “Lookout” pond
  • Improve health of the Enkianthus through practicing sound horticulture: mulching, watering and fertilizing the grove

For more information about the ornamental shrub, Enkianthus campanulatus, go to Wikipedia website below:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enkianthus_campanulatus

 

 

 

 

Share

A glimpse into the past – new buildings for visitors and crew

August 4th, 2014 by UWBG Communication Staff
photo

Looking east, new sewer lines were installed behind the old apartment (aka barn).

By John A. Wott, Director Emeritus

The first buildings to be added to the grounds of the Washington Park Arboretum were begun in 1985, as defined in the Jones and Jones Master Plan Update for the Washington Park Arboretum. It took almost ten years for the building plans to be finalized and the funds to be raised. The public building was named the Donald B. Graham Visitors Center, and it housed offices, meeting spaces, public information space and a gift shop.

The Arboretum Foundation conducted the fund raising campaign, with the City of Seattle Parks Department supervising the project.

The original Works Progress Administration-constructed office/crew building was razed. A near-by large barn/apartment building was converted into the current crew headquarters and shop, with the upstairs apartment eventually being converted to office space. A new machine storage shed was added and the terrain of the land greatly changed.

The photographs taken March/April 1985 show sewer work and the building foundation and beginning walls of the storage shed. The new facilities were dedicated in 1986.

 

 

 

photo

Looking north to the new shed under construction and re-purposed apartment (aka barn).

phptp

Walls for the new storage shed being poured.


Share

July Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum (Part II)

August 4th, 2014 by UWBG Arborist, Chris Watson
Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (July 21 - August 8, 2014)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (July 21 – August 8, 2014)

1)   Houpu Magnolia    (Magnolia officinalis var. biloba)

  • Unique bi-lobed leaf 8-12″ in length
  • 4-8″ seed pods on display in late summer
  • Located in grid 27-1W in the Rhododendron hybrid bed

2)   Sargent Magnolia    (Magnolia sargentiana var. robusta)

  • Bears large pink flowers in spring
  • Large, pinkish-red fruit appear in late summer and fall
  • Located in grid 13-7E in Rhododendron Glen

3)   Rehder Tree    (Rehderodendron macrocarpum)

  • White flowers appear in spring
  • 3-4″ seed pods weigh down branches in late summer
  • Located in grid 13-6E and elsewhere throughout the Washington Park Arboretum

4)   Himalayan Stachyurus    (Stachyurus himilaicus)

  • Deciduous or semi-evergreen shrub to height of 10’
  • Displays clusters of flowers in early spring
  • Located in grid 25-1W

5)   Yunnan Stachyurus    (Stachyurus yunnanensis)

  • Small evergreen shrub to height of 6’
  • Chains of white flowers appear in spring
  • Located in grid 25-1W
Share

A Local Beauty

July 27th, 2014 by Catherine Nelson, Adult Tours Program Assistant

tplicatabranchesThis photo is of a native Thuja Plicata (common name; Western Red Cedar) and shows the great J-arm branches that these trees feature. Although the Puget Mill Company logged most trees on the site by 1900, this particular Thuja was perhaps overlooked by the loggers and is therefore one of the oldest and largest specimens in the arboretum. It is located between the Witt Winter Garden and Azalea Way.
This tree species was valued by the local Salish tribes who called it the “tree of life” as it provided them with bark for clothing, dried leaves for a medicinal tea, and planks for longhouses among many other uses.
Our August Free Weekend Walk’s topic is Native Plants & People; a knowledgeable guide will talk about this tree and various other native plants and their ethnobotanical uses.

Share

Summer Camp in Full Swing!

July 22nd, 2014 by Arboretum Education Supervisor, Patrick Mulligan

UW Botanic Gardens Summer Camps are in full swing at the Arboretum as we begin Week 4: “Tadpoles & Whirligigs”. Last week’s “Don’t Bug Out” camp was a big hit with our 6 – 12 year old audience, and to go along with the theme, we gave our 48 campers a survey about insects. Surprisingly, though most kids thought that if insects were human-sized, ants would most likely take over the world, “flying” was the more desired insect super power with “ant strength” barely registering. See below for all the results, and follow this link if you’d like to take the survey yourself! https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/M6P29LK

 

kids_Bug_Survey_Page_1 kids_Bug_Survey_Page_2

kids_Bug_Survey_Page_3

Share

Art Exhibit: Oil Paintings by Kathleen Wolfe opens August 5

July 22nd, 2014 by UWBG Communication Staff

Wolfe paintingSeattle Parks and the Northwest
Artist Kathleen Wolfe celebrates her love of nature with oil paintings on canvas featuring poppies, water lilies and landscape with majestic trees. Her paintings will be on display in the Miller Library from August 5th to September 16th.

Meet the artist at a free reception at the Elisabeth C. Miller Library on Wednesday, August 13th from 5:00 to 7:00pm. 3501 NE 41st Street, Seattle.

Share