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University of Washington Botanic Gardens

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Washington Park Arboretum
Center for Urban Horticulture

Seasonal Highlights

Selected Cuttings from the Gardens This Month

Month by Month

  • January: Heather, hellebore, holly, mahonia, sarcococca, witch hazel, the Winter Garden.
  • February: Daphne, dogwood, chimonanthus, heather, hellebore, holly, rhododendron, sarcococca, witch hazel, the Winter Garden.
  • March: Camellia, flowering cherry, corylopsis, daphne, forsythia, heather, hellebore, magnolia, rhododendron, witch hazel.
  • April: Azalea Way, barberry, camellia, flowering cherry, halesia, maple, madrona, magnolia, rhododendron, serviceberry.
  • May: Crab apple, dogwood, magnolia, mountain ash, rhododendron, red bud,serviceberry.
  • June: Rock roses, brooms, Korean dogwood, rhododendrons, stewartia, styrax.
  • July: Stewartia, eucryphia, hydrangeas, maackias. Tree Tour trail map
  • August: Eucryphias, hydrangea, sorrel trees, crabapples(fruit). Tree Tour trail map
  • September: Franklinia, Japanese maples, sorrel trees. Tree Tour trail map
  • October: Fall Colors: Japanese maples, witch hazels, sourgums, sorrel trees, buckeyes, strawberry trees, mountain ash. Tree tour trail map
  • November: Hollies, callicarpa, mountain ash, viburnum. Tree tour trail map
  • December: Sarcococca, hollies, the Winter Garden.

October Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (10/6/14-10/19/14)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (10/6/14-10/19/14)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1)   Franklinia alatamaha

Close-up photo of Franklinia flower

Close-up photo of Franklinia flower

  • Native to the Alatamaha River, Georgia, and discovered in the late 18th.
  • Genus contains just one species, and has long been extinct in the wild. Today’s plants all descend, it is believed, from those cultivated in Philadelphia under the name chosen by William Bartram in honor of Benjamin Franklin.
  • Specimen located along Arboretum Drive near the Camellias.

2)   Ilex crenata      ‘Mariesii’

Close-up photo of Rehderodendron seed pods

Close-up photo of Rehderodendron seed pods

  • A very slow-growing female holly with tiny leaves and black fruit. Collected in Japan around 1890 by Charles Maries and sent to Veitch Nursery.
  • Located within the Asian/North American clade in the Holly wedge.

3)   Rehderodendron macrocarpum

  • An upright deciduous tree with red young shoots and glossy dark green leaves.
  • Native to western China, seeds from macrocarpum were first collected in 1932 from a fruiting specimen on Mount Omei in the Szechwan Province.
  • This specimen is located in grid 36-B, northwest of the Winter Garden.

4)   Sorbus helenae

  • Very distinctive species only recently introduced to cultivation. White fruits and autumn leaf color make helenae an attractive tree this time of year.
  • Located about midway through the Mountain Ashes, west of the path.

5)   Viburnum odoratissimum

  • A vigorous, bushy evergreen shrub with glossy, dark green leaves and red fruit ripening to black.
  • Native to India, China, Burma, Philippines, and Japan.
  • Located in grid 12-8E along Arboretum Drive.
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September Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum (Part II)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (September 22 - October 6, 2014)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (September 22 – October 6, 2014)

1)    Alnus glutinosa ssp. betuloides
Birch-leaved Alder

  • Native to the mountains of eastern Turkey.
  • Listed as a threatened species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.
  • Autumn brings pendulous male catkins and the mature female cones.

 

2)   Catalpa x erubescens        Indian Bean Tree

  • Uncommon tree with fetching, large, chocolate-purple young leaves that turn green.
  • Late summer brings masses of creamy white flowers flecked with yellow.
  • Hanging seed pods appear and remain long after the leaves have dropped.

3)   Pterocarya rhoifolia        Japanese Wingnut

  • The Wingnuts belong to the Walnut (Juglandaceae) family.
  • The amount of edible nut is comparable to that of the Scots Pine, i.e. not much.
  • The hanging decorative catkins give the tree a distinctive appearance in late summer.

4)   Styrax obassia        Fragrant Snowbell

  • This tree produces 6-8 inch fragrant white bell shaped flowers May to June.
  • Native to Hokkaido Island of Japan.
  • The tiny green seed pods hang like ornaments well into late summer/fall.

5)   X Sycoparrotia semidecidua        Chinese Fig Hazel

  • An inter-generic cross between two species – Parrotia persica and Sycopsis sinensis.
  • The flowers are unique, inconspicuous and easy to overlook.
  • The seed pods are beautiful ocher-colored, three dimensional stars.
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