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University of Washington Botanic Gardens

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Washington Park Arboretum
Center for Urban Horticulture

Seasonal Highlights

Selected Cuttings from the Gardens This Month

Month by Month

  • January: Heather, hellebore, holly, mahonia, sarcococca, witch hazel, the Winter Garden.
  • February: Daphne, dogwood, chimonanthus, heather, hellebore, holly, rhododendron, sarcococca, witch hazel, the Winter Garden.
  • March: Camellia, flowering cherry, corylopsis, daphne, forsythia, heather, hellebore, magnolia, rhododendron, witch hazel.
  • April: Azalea Way, barberry, camellia, flowering cherry, halesia, maple, madrona, magnolia, rhododendron, serviceberry.
  • May: Crab apple, dogwood, magnolia, mountain ash, rhododendron, red bud,serviceberry.
  • June: Rock roses, brooms, Korean dogwood, rhododendrons, stewartia, styrax.
  • July: Stewartia, eucryphia, hydrangeas, maackias. Tree Tour trail map
  • August: Eucryphias, hydrangea, sorrel trees, crabapples(fruit). Tree Tour trail map
  • September: Franklinia, Japanese maples, sorrel trees. Tree Tour trail map
  • October: Fall Colors: Japanese maples, witch hazels, sourgums, sorrel trees, buckeyes, strawberry trees, mountain ash. Tree tour trail map
  • November: Hollies, callicarpa, mountain ash, viburnum. Tree tour trail map
  • December: Sarcococca, hollies, the Winter Garden.

November Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum (Part II)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (November 24, 2014 - December 7, 2014)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (November 24 – December 7, 2014)

1)    Araucaria araucana      (Monkey Puzzle)

  • Native to Chile, no other conifer quite like it!
  • Seeds are used to make an alcoholic ceremonial drink called mudai.

2)   Picea glauca      (White Spruce)

  • Native to northern temperate forests of North America.
  • Captain Cook made a spruce beer, possibly curing his crew from scurvy.

3)   Pinus cembra      (Swiss Stone Pine)

  • Native to Alps of Central Europe.
  • Try a Royal Tannenbaum cocktail made with Zirbenz Stone Pine liqueur!

4)   Pseudotsuga menziesii      (Douglas Fir)

  • Native to our “neck of the woods”.
  • McCarthy’s Clear Creek Distillery (in Portland OR) makes a green spirit from Douglas Fir buds called Douglas Fir eau-de-vie.

5)   Taiwania cryptomerioides      (Coffin Tree)

  • Native to eastern Asia.
  • Imbibe too much and you may wind up in a box made from this tree. :(

 


* All references to alcoholic drinks are from the book, The Drunken Botanist
by Amy Stewart, ©2013,  Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill.

NOTE:  Use our interactive on-line map for location and other information on the above
http://depts.washington.edu/uwbg/gardens/map.shtml
[Enter Latin name in search box in the upper right corner.]

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November Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (November 3 - 16, 2014)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (November 3 – 16, 2014)

 

1)    Callicarpa bodinieri var. giraldii  ‘Profusion’  (Beautyberry)

  • Native to western China.
  • Ornamental purple berries on display in autumn months.
  • Specimen located north of the Wilcox Bridge by the parking lot.

 

2)    Gaultheria mucronata    ‘Rubra’

  • Native to southern Chile.
  • Formerly known as Pernettya, this particular variety has carmine pink berries.
  • Specimen is located in the Chilean Gateway Garden.

3)   Grevillea victoriae    ‘Marshall Olbricht’

  • Native to Australia. This cultivar is from a seedling, possibly a hybrid, named for the co-founder of Western Hills Nursery in California.
  • Exotic orange flowers persist throughout winter – loved by hummingbirds.
  • Specimen located in the Australian entry garden at Pacific Connections.

4)   Quercus cerris   (Turkey Oak)

  • Native to southern Europe.
  • Notable for hairy caps on the acorns. Trunk can reach six feet in diameter.
  • Specimen located in the Viburnum Collection near Lake Washington Boulevard.

5)   Wollemia nobilis   (Wollemi Pine)

  • Not a pine, but a member of Araucaceae, the family of the Monkey Puzzle Tree.
  • Wollemia was known only from fossil records until it was discovered in Australia’s Wollemi National Park in 1994 by David Noble, hence its name.
  • Our specimen is growing at the bus turnaround on Arboretum Drive.
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