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University of Washington Botanic Gardens

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Washington Park Arboretum
Center for Urban Horticulture

Seasonal Highlights

Selected Cuttings from the Gardens This Month

Month by Month

  • January: Heather, hellebore, holly, mahonia, sarcococca, witch hazel, the Winter Garden.
  • February: Daphne, dogwood, chimonanthus, heather, hellebore, holly, rhododendron, sarcococca, witch hazel, the Winter Garden.
  • March: Camellia, flowering cherry, corylopsis, daphne, forsythia, heather, hellebore, magnolia, rhododendron, witch hazel.
  • April: Azalea Way, barberry, camellia, flowering cherry, halesia, maple, madrona, magnolia, rhododendron, serviceberry.
  • May: Crab apple, dogwood, magnolia, mountain ash, rhododendron, red bud,serviceberry.
  • June: Rock roses, brooms, Korean dogwood, rhododendrons, stewartia, styrax.
  • July: Stewartia, eucryphia, hydrangeas, maackias. Tree Tour trail map
  • August: Eucryphias, hydrangea, sorrel trees, crabapples(fruit). Tree Tour trail map
  • September: Franklinia, Japanese maples, sorrel trees. Tree Tour trail map
  • October: Fall Colors: Japanese maples, witch hazels, sourgums, sorrel trees, buckeyes, strawberry trees, mountain ash. Tree tour trail map
  • November: Hollies, callicarpa, mountain ash, viburnum. Tree tour trail map
  • December: Sarcococca, hollies, the Winter Garden.

September Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum (Part II)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (September 22 - October 6, 2014)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (September 22 – October 6, 2014)

1)    Alnus glutinosa ssp. betuloides
Birch-leaved Alder

  • Native to the mountains of eastern Turkey.
  • Listed as a threatened species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.
  • Autumn brings pendulous male catkins and the mature female cones.

 

2)   Catalpa x erubescens        Indian Bean Tree

  • Uncommon tree with fetching, large, chocolate-purple young leaves that turn green.
  • Late summer brings masses of creamy white flowers flecked with yellow.
  • Hanging seed pods appear and remain long after the leaves have dropped.

3)   Pterocarya rhoifolia        Japanese Wingnut

  • The Wingnuts belong to the Walnut (Juglandaceae) family.
  • The amount of edible nut is comparable to that of the Scots Pine, i.e. not much.
  • The hanging decorative catkins give the tree a distinctive appearance in late summer.

4)   Styrax obassia        Fragrant Snowbell

  • This tree produces 6-8 inch fragrant white bell shaped flowers May to June.
  • Native to Hokkaido Island of Japan.
  • The tiny green seed pods hang like ornaments well into late summer/fall.

5)   X Sycoparrotia semidecidua        Chinese Fig Hazel

  • An inter-generic cross between two species – Parrotia persica and Sycopsis sinensis.
  • The flowers are unique, inconspicuous and easy to overlook.
  • The seed pods are beautiful ocher-colored, three dimensional stars.
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September Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum


The State of the Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (September 8 - 21, 2014)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (September 8 – 21, 2014)

1)   Liriodendron tulipifera        Tulip Tree

  • The state tree of Indiana.
  • The Western Hemisphere representative of the two-species genus Liriodendron, and the tallest eastern hardwood.

2)   Pinus resinosa                 Red Pine

  • The state tree of Minnesota.
  • It is a long-lived tree, reaching a maximum age of about 500 years.
  • The wood is commercially valuable in forestry for timber and paper pulp, and the tree is also used for landscaping.

3)   Pinus strobus        Eastern White Pine

  • The state tree of Michigan.
  • Eastern white pine forests originally covered much of northeastern North America. Only one percent of the old-growth forests remain after the extensive logging operations that existed from the 18th century into the early 20th century.
  • This tree is known to the Native American Haudenosaunee (Iroquois Nation) as the “Tree of Peace”.

4)   Sequoia sempervirens        Coast Redwood

  • The state tree of California.
  • These trees are among the oldest living things on Earth.
  • Before commercial logging and clearing began by the 1850s, this massive tree occurred along much of coastal California and the southwestern corner of coastal Oregon.

5)   Tsuga hetrophylla        Western Hemlock

  • The state tree of Washington.
  • Tsuga heterophylla is an integral component of Pacific Northwest forests west of the Coast Ranges, where it is a climax species. It is also an important timber tree throughout the region, along with many of its large coniferous associates.
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