UW Virology Newsletter

October, 2019

The most common viral infection detected this month has been Rhinovirus. Rhinoviruses are members of the picornavirus family that also include enteroviruses and hepatitis A virus. Unlike the other human members of this family, rhinoviruses do not replicate in the intestinal tract and infections are limited to the upper and lower respiratory tracts.

Rhinoviruses can be grown in tissue culture and are differentiated from enteroviruses based on their lability at pH 3. Molecular detection of rhinovirus RNA is challenging because the genus consists of more than 100 genetic subtypes. In some of the commercially-available kit PCR tests, the distinction between rhinoviruses and enteroviruses cannot be done.  Most rhinovirus PCR assays target the 5’ noncoding region of the genome, which exhibits the most homology between strains. The PCR primer sets used in the UW semi-quantitative respiratory virus panel have been tested using RNA isolated from over 80 rhinovirus subtypes and showed sensitive detection of each type of Rhinovirus. Although an increase in detection of rhinoviruses is seen in the winter months, these viruses are one of the few respiratory viruses that are detected throughout the year.

Follow the area’s epidemiological data each week on the UW Virology web site at http://depts.washington.edu/uwviro/respiratory-viral-epidemiology-data/.

 

 

Community detections: September 2019

ISOLATES
Adenovirus – 0
CMV – 10
Enterovirus – 2
HSV – 15
Influenza A – 0
Influenza B – 0
Parainfluenza – 2
Rhinovirus – 3
RSV – 0
VZV – 0

PCR POSITIVES
Adenovirus – 26
BK Virus – 132
Bocavirus – 1
CMV – 229
Coronavirus – 2
EBV – 31
Enterovirus – 1
HHV6 – 10
HHV8 – 2
HSV – 41
Influenza A – 11
Influenza B – 1
JC Virus – 0
Metapneumovirus – 1
Norovirus – 0
Parainfluenza – 5
Parechovirus – 0
Parvo B19 – 1
Rhinovirus – 85
Rotavirus – 0
RSV – 0
VZV – 11
Zika Virus – 0