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Ion mobility (IM) is a suite of technologies that leverages fundamental ion-neutral interactions, is complementary to mass spectrometry (MS), and shares the core strengths of sensitivity, selectivity, and speed. Seattle is home to a vibrant IM-MS community. The vision of Mobility Enabled Science in Seattle (MESS) is to leverage the expertise and resources of this community to advance the contributions of IM to the environmental, health, and physical sciences.

The next MESS meeting will be held on September 21, 2018. See Events for more information. For more information, please email us at mess@uw.edu.

Events

The next MESS meeting will be held at 10:30 am on September 21, 2018 in Bagley Hall room TBD.

Prof. Chris Hogan (Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota)

    • The Hogan lab focuses broadly on the physics and chemistry governing aerosols (particle/droplet laden gas flows). Current work in my group focuses on the application of aerosol technology in advanced manufacturing, as well as in developing new methods to characterize nanoparticle size, shape, and surface properties. Recent research projects include (i) the development of high-throughput supersonic deposition systems for the production of thin films from nanoparticle precursors, (ii) fundamental investigation into particle formation growth in high temperature and non-equilibrium (plasma) environments, (iii) the application of ion mobility – mass spectrometry (IM-MS) to examine vapor sorption by nanometer scale clusters, and (iv) the development of a drift tube ion mobility spectrometer (DT-IMS) for the rapid analysis of 1-40 nm particles from both liquid and gas phase systems.
    • Additional background on research in the Hogan lab is available from https://chrishogansite.wordpress.com/

Past Events

MESS labs also participate in:

News

Characterization of the Mechanisms of Daptomycin Resistance among Gram-Positive Bacterial Pathogens by Multidimensional Lipidomics

Characterization of the Mechanisms of Daptomycin Resistance among Gram-Positive Bacterial Pathogens by Multidimensional Lipidomics. Kelly M. Hines, Adam Waalkes, Kelsi Penewit, Elizabeth A. Holmes, Stephen J. Salipante, Brian J. Werth, Libin Xu. mSphere 2017, 2, DOI: 10.1128/mSphere.00492-17. (Link) Previous work suggests that altered lipid metabolism may be associated with daptomycin resistance in Gram-positive pathogens, but lipidomic changes underlying resistance are …