• 10 • President’s Medalists The President’s Medal is presented annually by the University of Washington president to two graduating seniors who have achieved the most distinguished academic records in their class. One medal is given to a student who has completed at least three-fourths of his or her degree requirements at the University of Washington. The other is given to a student who entered the University with at least 60 transfer credits from a Washington community college. This year’s medalists are Celina Ebba Gunnarsson, of Seattle, Washington, who is graduating summa cum laude with a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and a Bachelor of Arts degree in English, and Narmina E. Sharifova, of Bellevue, Washington, who is graduating summa cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Law, Societies and Justice. Celina Ebba Gunnarsson Narmina E. Sharifova Alumnus Summa Laude Dignatus Award Since 1938, the University and the Alumni Association have presented an award to a former University of Washington student whose work has attained national or international prominence. The Alumnus Summa Laude Dignatus award, which means “alumnus worthy of the highest praise,” is the highest honor bestowed by the University. The recipient is selected by a committee of University faculty and alumni. Today we add to the long and distinguished list of individuals who have received this award the name of the Honorable Norman B. Rice, former mayor of Seattle from 1989-97. After earning an associate of arts degree at Highline Community College in 1970, Mr. Rice entered the University of Washington, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in communications in 1972, and, two years later, a master’s degree in public administration. He initially worked as a news reporter for Seattle’s KIKI radio and editor at KOMO- TV, and in the mid 70’s held positions as the Executive Assistant and Director of Government Services for the Puget Sound Council of Governments, assistant director of the Seattle Urban League, and Manager of Corporate Contributions and Social Policy at Rainier National Bank. In 1978, he was elected to the Seattle City Council, where he remained for the next 11 years. As a councilmember, he helped fund weatherization and energy assistance programs for low-income families and sponsored programs to reduce crime, fight drug use, and promote diversity and human rights. Mr. Rice was elected mayor of Seattle in 1989 and reelected in 1993. As mayor, he revitalized Seattle’s downtown core. He gave Seattle residents a strong voice in decisions affecting their neighborhoods, strengthened Seattle’s public schools, championed crime prevention, and worked to address the growing number of homeless residents. During his tenure, Seattle was named the best U.S. city for business by Fortune magazine and the nation’s second-most-livable city by Rand McNally. In 1998, he was named executive vice president of Federal Home Loan Bank of Seattle and was named CEO in 1999, serving in that capacity until 2004, when he stepped down to become Vice Chairman of Capital Access LLC, an investment bank. In 2006, while still at Capital, Mr. Rice joined the University of Washington’s Evans School of Public Policy and Governance as a distinguished practitioner-in-residence. His relationship with the Evans School continued even when he left Capital to begin a five-year term (2009-2014) as CEO of the Seattle Foundation, which manages philanthropic funds for people and businesses. Mr. Rice currently oversees the Evans School’s Civic Engagement for the 21st Century Project, aimed at designing a new model for civic engagement through seminars, workshops, and research. Mr. Rice has received numerous national and regional awards recognizing his leadership and service, including the American Jewish Federation’s Human Relations Award (with wife Constance Rice), the National Neighborhood Coalition’s National Award for Leadership on Behalf of Neighborhoods, and the Washington Council on Crime and Delinquency’s Mark F. Cooper Leadership Award.