• 5 • Orion Keith, College of Built Environments Addison Elizabeth Francis, College of Arts & Sciences Jenny Sayuri Masuoka, College of Arts & Sciences Verónica Paulina Cedillo Hernandez, College of Arts & Sciences Abbie Lynn Hanson, College of Arts & Sciences Dorothy Cabantan, College of Arts & Sciences Achombom Jude Tunyi, College of Arts & Sciences Robert James Swan, College of the Environment Jamie Leitzke, Foster School of Business Odin Atkinson, Foster School of Business Diane Marie Daubert, Alaa (Alan) Yassin, co-banner carriers, School of Dentistry Sarah Amber Evans, College of Education Songtian (Tim) Zeng, College of Education Alexis Joy Harroun, College of Engineering Celina Gunnarsson, College of Engineering Nai-Ching Chi, Graduate School Florentina Dedu-Constantin, Graduate School Andy Herman, Graduate School Joseph Fredrick Blake, Jr., Graduate School Brittney Ka-Yen Hoy, Information School Jonathan Peilong Li, Information School Olga Barajas, School of Law Allison Pringle, School of Medicine Michelle Pui Yan Yip, School of Nursing Anastasia Marie Baide, School of Pharmacy Viviana Yolanda Garza, Evans School of Public Policy & Governance Jacqueline Ellen Wu, Evans School of Public Policy & Governance Nguyen Huynh, School of Public Health Justine Gail Cruise-Robinson, School of Social Work The Academic Regalia The academic dress worn by scholars originated in the Middle Ages. When European universities were taking form in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the scholars usually were clerics as well, and they adopted garb similar to that of their monastic orders. Buildings were cold and drafty, so caps and warm, floor-length capes with hoods were necessities. As the control of education passed from the churches, the garb was modified in various ways, and there was great diversity in color and style of cap, gown, and hood worn at the different institutions. The custom of wearing academic dress was brought to America in colonial times, but it was not until 1895 that a standardized code of academic dress was established and followed by most colleges and universities in the United States. Both cap and gown are symbols. According to legend, the privilege of wearing a cap was the initial right of a freed Roman slave. The academic cap, therefore, has become a sign of the freedom of scholarship. The flowing gown has become symbolic of the democracy of scholarship, for it covers clothing that could indicate rank or social stratum. At the University of Washington, the bachelor’s and master’s gowns are black. The matching Oxford cap, or mortarboard, has a long tassel fastened to the middle of the top. The tassel is worn pendant over the left side of the cap. The colors of the tassels or hoods are distinctive of the candidate’s school or college. College of Arts and Sciences Bachelor of Arts White Bachelor of Design Brown Bachelor of Fine Arts Brown Bachelor of Music Pink Bachelor of Science Golden Yellow College of Built Environments Blue Violet College of Education Light Blue College of Engineering Orange College of the Environment Golden Yellow School of Aquatic Fishery & Sciences Golden Yellow School of Forest Resources Russet School of Marine Affairs Golden Yellow School of Oceanography Golden Yellow Evans School of Public Policy and Governance Peacock Blue Foster School of Business Royal Blue Graduate School Doctoral degrees – Gold Master’s degrees – Black Information School Lemon School of Dentistry Lilac School of Law Purple School of Medicine Green School of Nursing Apricot School of Pharmacy Olive Green School of Public Health Salmon Pink School of Social Work Citron The doctoral gown at the University of Washington is purple with velvet facing and three bars of velvet on the sleeves. Doctoral degree candidates in Medicine, Law, Dentistry and Pharmacy wear the black professional doctoral gown with black chevrons on the sleeves. Advanced degree (doctoral and master’s degree) candidates also wear the academic hood, the traditional garment that signifies high scholarly attainment. The colors of the master’s and professional degree hoods are distinctive of the candidate’s degree earned. The doctoral hood of bright satin purple and gold reflects the colors of the University of Washington. The Gonfalons Gonfalons are the banners suspended on crossbars that herald the entrance of each of the University’s sixteen schools and colleges. The word derives from 12th century Florence, Italy, where each district had its own unique banner, or gonfalon. The gonfalons became symbols of state and were carried in processions by a chief magistrate or other elected official. Outstanding students are awarded the honor of carrying their school’s gonfalon and leading their fellow graduates into the stadium. Our gonfalonieres this year are: